Barney’s Matchbook Cover
September 22, 2016 – 12:07 am | 3 Comments

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.
I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.
Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother …

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Ag Class Builds Barn – ca. 1915

Submitted by on May 31, 2011 – 4:56 pm8 Comments
Pictured left to right:  Alfred Brener, Fred Chamberlain, Frank Hebel, Herman Hebel, George Moen, Harry Elmlund, John Kruger, McKinley Van Eaton, Morris Calloway, Dewey Fredrickson, Eddie Kiddleman, B.W. Lyon Superintendent and Ag.  Teacher, Francis Canty, John Hotes, Lawrence Fairbairn, Ernest Jacobson, Matt Kjelstad and Dee Kendle.

Pictured left to right: Alfred Breuer, Fred Chamberlain, Frank Hebel, Herman Hebel, George Moen, Harry Elmlund, John Kruger, McKinley Van Eaton, Morris Calloway, Dewey Fredrickson, Eddie Kiddleman, B.W. Lyon Superintendent and Ag. Teacher, Francis Canty, John Hotes, Lawrence Fairbairn, Ernest Jacobson, Matt Kjelstad and Dee Kendle.

The guys who took Ag back in the 1915 weren’t just good at raising animals, they were also pretty good at raising barns. This barn was built and designed by the students. It stood North of today’s football field.

In the second photo, these students tested the cattle for Tuberculosis. (Which is a rare disease today.)

Poultry pens
The Ag department also had poultry raising pens in the same spot.

The smells at school must have been a little different than the ones today.

Ag students testing cattle for Tuberculosis.

Ag students testing cattle for Tuberculosis.

 

 

 

 

Photos courtesy of the Haynes family.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poultry pens at Eatonville High.

Poultry pens at Eatonville High.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Ag students in the poultry pen.

The Ag students in the poultry pen.

 



8 Comments »

  • Margaret Breuer Daubert says:

    My Dad, Alfred Breuer, is mislabeled Alfred Brener in the top picture. He’s also in the poultry pen photo. He was 15 years old in 1915 and looks just look my brother Robert did in the 40’s – especially that sweet smile while nonchalantly holding a leghorn. Precious memories – thank you.

  • […] had thought that the dark-roofed building at the top left of the football field was the FFA poultry barn.  I was mistaken. Pat Van Eaton says, “It was the 1952 addition to the grade school. It […]

  • […] H. Asmussen, Ralph Benston, Alfrew Brewer, Henry Christensen, Will Canty, Einer M. Carlson, Francis Canty, T. Carroll, Ed Christensen, Cassidy, Robert Else, Harry Elmlund, George Fenton, Jas. Franklin, Fred […]

  • […] McKinley (Mack) Van Eaton did well in Eatonville High School during the 1913 – 1914 school year. Subjects included English II, Latin II, Geometry II, Marv. Training, art, and penmanship. […]

  • […] George Moen, 2-3233 • Fred Morrison, 2-4872 • Jeff Morrow, 134J1 • Morey’s Place, 142J31 • Don […]

  • Terry Larson says:

    Sorry. I started to post an article about L. Fairbairn from the Washington Standard, Olympia, WA, when I hit the wrong button. It is as follows:

    FAIRBAIRN STARTS COW TESTING WORK
    Graduate of Famous Eatonville High School Hird by County Associations
    Regular work in testing cows for tuberculosis for the combined associations of Grays Harbor and Thurston counties began today in Grays Harbor when L.D. Fairbairn went to work under the direction of Robert Cowan, agriculturist for Grays Harbor county. Mr. Cowan was a cow tester before taking up work as county agent and he will get Mr. Fairbairn started right in the place of F.W. Kehrlie, the dairy specialist, who is incapacitated by illness. Mr. Fairbairn is a graduate of the Eatonville high school where he studied under the direction of D.W. Lyons (note article says “D.W.” rather than “B.W.”) who made a national reputation by his work in vocational and agricultural training at the Eatonville school. Mr. Fairbairn has completed three years’ work at the state college and he is a young man who has the farmer’s viewpoint since he was brought up on a farm.
    The herd owners and the number of cows in each herd to be tested in Thurston county are as follows: T.A. Rutledge, 19; O.E. Ferguson, 16; Cloverfields Farm, 36; A.H. Kaiser, 15; Fred Krahne, 8; C.C. Aspinwell, 20; C.E. Starr, 8; R.J. Kegley, 16; Lee Kegley, 16; F. Capen, 15; E.H. Vancil, 9; D.R. Hughes, 8; Albert Gehrke, 19; L.F. Davis, 10; G.B. Churchill, 10; W.F. Churchill, 6; John Barnes, 14; John O’Connor, 14; A.E. Lundeen, 12; R.H. Aimer, 4; E.E. McPherson, 20.

  • Terry Larson says:

    The Fairbairn article was found at Chronicling America online. The date of the Washington Standard article was May 6, 1921, on page 2.

    On pictures above, Frank HEBEL and Herman HEBEL should be Frank and Herman HEKEL.

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