Barney’s Matchbook Cover
September 22, 2016 – 12:07 am | 3 Comments

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.
I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.
Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother …

Read the full story »
The Native Americans

The First Settlers

The Early 1900s

The 30s, 40s and 50s

To The Present

Home » The First Settlers

Swan Lake School, 1893

Submitted by on May 5, 2011 – 6:29 pm15 Comments
Swan Lake School, 1893

Swan Lake School, 1893

The first school built was the Swan Lake School, #40, and measured about  16′ x 24′ .

The following is taken from Timber Town and Later:

The school was “made of rough boards” from Tominson’s Mill at Hart’s Lake. It had windows on each side, a split cedar shake roof, a plank floor, and “a small hewn log served as a door step”.

Heat
The school was heated by a wood burning “box” in the center of the room. Students were responsible for keeping a supply of wood cut and ready for use.

Swan Lake Roster, 1893

Swan Lake Roster, 1893

Plumbing
A water bucket sat to the right of the entrance on a wooden bench and was filled from a well at the Fiander homestead about half mile away.

Seating
The first seats and desks were homemade. The students’ seats and desks were one unit and several children sat at a unit. The teacher’s desk stood at the front of the room opposite the door. On the teacher’s desk you could find a hand bell and the few books she had at her disposal.

The blackboard was simply two painted boards set end to end, with a  small space between. And the teacher and students joined forces keeping the school clean.

Subjects
The first year students were taught reading, math and writing. “There was actually little formal reading done as the first requirement was to learn the alphabet.”

School Year
The school year was only three months long, with days running from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The bad news . . . school ran during the summer.

15 Comments »

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.