Barney’s Matchbook Cover
September 22, 2016 – 12:07 am | 3 Comments

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.
I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.
Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother …

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Nisqually River, early 1900s

Submitted by on July 20, 2011 – 9:00 am3 Comments
Where the Nisqually and Mashell meet

Where the Nisqually and Mashell meet

It’s easy to take the Nisqually river for granted when you live in Eatonville. For those of you, like me, that have seen it your entire life but don’t know a lot about it, here are a few facts:

• It’s 81 miles long

• Forms the Pierce/Lewis county line

• It’s fed by the Nisqually Glacier at Mount Rainier

• Runs through Ashford and Elbe before hitting the hydro electric dam in La Grande

• The river was the traditional territorial center for the Nisqually tribe

Nisqually River, early 1900s

Nisqually River, early 1900s

• The Nisqually watershed includes all lands which drain to the Nisqually River, including the communities of: Ashford, Elbe, Mineral, Eatonville, McKenna, Roy, Yelm, Fort Lewis, and portions of Graham, Lacey, DuPont, and Rainier.

• Where the Nisqually meets the Puget Sound — the Nisqually River Delta — is currently a National Wildlife Refuge. It’s famous for it’s 275 migratory bird species.
Photos courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

Another shots of Nisqually River - early 1900s

Another shots of Nisqually River - early 1900s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Railroad along Nisqually River, early 1900s

Railroad along Nisqually River, early 1900s

 

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