Barney’s Matchbook Cover
September 22, 2016 – 12:07 am | 3 Comments

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.
I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.
Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother …

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Eatonville Women in Costume

Submitted by on September 23, 2011 – 12:57 am7 Comments
Eatonville women dressed as Native Americans

Eatonville women dressed as Native Americans

I didn’t know a lot about this picture, except that these women were subgroup of the Redmen organization called the order of the Pocahontas. But then Terry Larson filled me in.

“The lovely young lady in the upper lefthand corner was my grandmother, Mary Mensik Biggs, wife of Charles Clifton (C.C.) Biggs and daughter of Frank and Mary (Povlack) Mensik. My grandfather was a member of the International Order of Red Men,” says Terry.

I would have liked to have hung out with these gals. They look like a lot of fun.

Picture courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

7 Comments »

  • David Beane says:

    Wumpum good time !! Drinking lots of firewater and smoking much peace pipe !! and maybe some of these funny mushrooms ??

  • “The Red Men Hall, built in 1905, was used by more than just the members who built it. It was a multipurpose center of sorts. Many times meetings are referred to as being held at the hall. Its primary function was to house the Improved Order of Red Men, Nisqually Tribe #81, of Eatonville. Though by today’s standards, it appears to be a mockery, like “playing Indians.” In practice, this group of men met to uphold important values of patriotism as those who dressed, as Indians and dumped tea into the Boston Harbor. They held charity events, raised money for those in need, and sponsored a baseball team. The Red Men Hall was a two story building constructed by the dedicated membership of 150 men in 1905.
    Connected with IORM was the Topeka Council #26 Degree of Pocahontas. ‘The degree work of the Pocahontas is very beautiful and interesting, commemorating many of the legends and ceremonies of the Indian race.’ Ironically, one had to be a white man to join this group. To be a member one also had to be a citizen of the United States and believe in a Supreme Being. The Red Men Hall was situated on Mashell Avenue and Carter Street just up above where Jebino’s is now.” excerpt from Firm Foundation

    Also, there are graves in Eatonville cemetery with IORM on the tombstones.

  • […] Red Men group has a subgroup called the Pocahontas. By today’s standards this groups’ costumes are about as far away from PC as you can […]

  • Terry Larson says:

    The lovely young lady in the upper lefthand corner was my grandmother, Mary Mensik Biggs, wife of Charles Clifton (C.C.) Biggs and daughter of Frank and Mary (Povlack) Mensik. My grandfather was a member of the International Order of Red Men.

  • […] kind of a parade float wouldn’t fly in today’s environment, but in year’s past  The Pocahontas— the female version of Eatonville’s Order of the Red Men — was […]

  • […] little girl in the white dress in the middle of the picture is my grandmother, Mary Mensik (later Mary Biggs).  The boy in the very back on the right hand side is her older brother, Frank […]

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