Barney’s Matchbook Cover
September 22, 2016 – 12:07 am | 3 Comments

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.
I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.
Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother …

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Home » The 30s, 40s and 50s, Uncategorized

Thank you everyone for Eatonville to Rainier is a success!

Submitted by on March 30, 2012 – 4:12 pm8 Comments
King's Place (ca. late 50s)

Inside King's Place (ca. late 50s)

Hi everyone,

I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone who has been coming to this site to check out our community’s history. This month the website hit a milestone — 5,000+ views for the month of March.

Many of you have provided pictures and information to help share the community’s rich history with others. Thank you!  Rest assured your effort and generosity is appreciated, not just by me, but the many folks who are coming to the site, enjoying the pictures and learning.

Visitors coming to the site have also been great about sharing their thoughts and memories, and that’s invaluable. There have even been a couple cases where people have learned they have long lost relatives on this site.

Thank you everyone. This is working because of you!

Keep sending those pictures and thoughts and I’ll keep posting.

Diane

Photo of King’s place courtesy of Margit Thorvaldson.

Click on image to enlarge.

8 Comments »

  • David Beane says:

    Thank you, Diane, for creating this great site. This is a very cool pic of Kings place. I had one of those ‘wee hunter’ knife/letter openers when I was a kid. I think I had one of those peace pipes also.
    I would love to have that JukeBox that’s in the picture. I really like that era, the bar stools, the black & white checked floor, etc.Maybe the new ownwers of Babe’s Cafe will do the retro look !!

  • John Kelso says:

    Another thanks from me too. You have so many pictures and I have enjoyed them over the last months. This one of Kings Place is nice. People seemed to care a lot more about everything back then. I noticed how clean everything looks . . even the ceiling is shiny!

    • dimettler says:

      Thanks. I agree, I love this picture on so many levels. And if my house looked half that clean I’d be THRILLED. 🙂

      If you’e got any pictures around feel free to email them along. I’m always posting. 🙂

  • Mike P says:

    Thank you for keeping this site rolling. I really enjoy it. Local history is something I find very intriguing. This site has been a great point of reference for just that.

    I am hoping to gain access to the site where the ruins of the Canyada Lodge are located. Maybe then I’ll be able to contribute as well. Thanks to recent photos posted here I also feel I am right next door to figuring out how Elbe was laid out at the turn of the century. I don’t know what it is about that town that sparks my curiosity, but it does.

    Thanks.

    • dimettler says:

      Wow, I can hardly wait until you get access. I have lots of pictures of Elbe. So, if you have facts, I can add pictures. 🙂 I think the place is pretty fascinating too.

      • Mike P says:

        My interest in Elbe stems from my dad taking me there as a child numerous times. We did the train tour thing when I was like eight or so. Mostly we cut firewood in the area.

        Fast forward and now I’m a very avid offroad enthusiast. My rig is a tube framed Grand Cherokee on 38s. I go “wheelin” three times a month on average and Elbe Hills ORV park is my favorite spot by far. The first time I sought out Elbe ORV for some wheelin was the first time I’d passed through Elbe in over a decade. I instantly connected those childhood memories of the small town with the train cars to the town of Elbe. Feels good to drive through that town on the way to what I live for.

        In my free time I’ve studied the available photos of Elbe closely and taken my own at certain points in town to try to line stuff up. Definitely in for more photos of the town from the early 1900s. As it stands I feel I’m 95% sure I know where Berlin Street was (is). The IOOF building was said to have been moved once. It is also said to have been built in the 1890s. The problem is the photo reportedly taken from the front porch or lawn of the Adam Sach house facing north west in the early 1900s does not feature the IOOF building pre or post move?

        More photos please? 🙂

        Mike

        • dimettler says:

          Cool story. I got into it because my mom would take us up swimming as a kid and the swimming hole at the time was this road that went into the lake, left over from when it was flooded out. As a little kid I was sure I was swimming ove the lost city of Atlantis or something. I’ll definitely post more pictures! 🙂

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