Barney’s Matchbook Cover
September 22, 2016 – 12:07 am | 3 Comments

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.
I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.
Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother …

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Eatonville and Indian Legends of Mount Rainer

Submitted by on June 18, 2012 – 5:19 pm3 Comments
Eatonville, looking down on Mashell, with Mount Rainier in the background

Eatonville, looking down on Mashell, with Mount Rainier in the background

This early shot of Eatonville shows a big of the downtown with Mount Rainier in the background.

Native American Legends
Native Americans saw mountains and male or female. It turns out that depending on the legend, Mount Rainier could be either.

“The Cowlitz had two legends . . . First, Mount Rainier (Takhoma) and Mount Adams (Pahto) were the wives of Mount St. Helens (Seuq). A terrible quarrel ensued between the wives and during the course of it, Takhoma stepped on all of Pahto’s children and killed htem. The two women turned into mountains.

“Under the next legend, Mount Rainier and Mount St. Helens were once separated by an inland sea. They had a fierce fight over who would rule the region, and hurled hot rocks at each other, shot flames form their sujmits and rained ash on the water between them. The birds finally intervened and took Rainier far inland, then peace settled on the land again.” (Per The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier.)

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click in image to enlarge.

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