Barney’s Matchbook Cover
September 22, 2016 – 12:07 am | 3 Comments

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.
I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.
Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother …

Read the full story »
The Native Americans

The First Settlers

The Early 1900s

The 30s, 40s and 50s

To The Present

Home » The 30s, 40s and 50s

June Carney Behind the Horses

Submitted by on December 18, 2012 – 3:53 am3 Comments
June (Jensen) Carney behind the horses

June (Jensen) Carney behind the horses

This shot was taken of a young June (Duffy) Carney behind the a team of horses on the family (Jensen) farm.

June is at the reins of the second photo too.

Horse teams may seem old-timey, but they are experiencing a come back.

“With smaller, more affordable equipment and with good teams starting at just a few thousand dollars, Klesick points out that horse farming can be an economical choice for the small farmer.

June (Jensen) Carney at the reigns

June (Jensen) Carney at the reigns

Klesick enjoys working with his 17 hand Belgian draft horse, half of what was once a team. Though he assures me that one horse can still do valuable work around the farm, he’s thinking of seeking out a smaller team in the 15.2 to 16.2 hand range—that is, 62 to 66 inches at the shoulder. “You don’t need to have a lot of horse,” he argues. “You want a horse with a powerful, healthy muscle structure and good angles in the hindquarters.” Klesick tips his hat to the moderately sized draft animals of historic farms, noting that “America was built with a smaller horse.”

(http://www.grownorthwest.com/2010/08/draft-power-using-horses-oxen-and-mules-on-the-farm/)

Photos courtesy of the Jensen family.

Click on image to enlarge.

3 Comments »

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.