Barney’s Matchbook Cover
September 22, 2016 – 12:07 am | 3 Comments

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.
I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.
Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother …

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Torger Wants a Road to Mount Rainier

Submitted by on June 2, 2014 – 9:00 amNo Comment
Man Behind the Canyon Road - Torger Peterson, center

Man Behind the Canyon Road – Torger Peterson, center

Torger Peterson, a pioneer from Norway, came to Ohop Valley in 1887. He built a farm, but road building may have been a bigger passion. These are the words from his autobiography.

“After we had cleared up some land, the main thing was to get a road, and the County helped us in this way; for every day we worked gratis, they would give us $2.00 a day for the following day, and this is the way the first road was built into the Ohop Valley and beyond.

It was always a puzzle to me how Norway, a poor country, had such splendid roads, and a country as rich in natural resources as our State of Washington, could get along with such poor roads, no better than a cow trail, and it was my chief object to see if I could not interest the people in getting good roads built so that the farmers could get their product to the markets at a reasonable cost.

Robert Mc Gilvery and team building the Canyon Road

Robert Mc Gilvery and team building the Canyon Road

In October, 1888, I went in company with Indian Henry and some other Indians up to Mount Tacoma. We went on horseback through brush over logs and finally landed in what is now known as Indian Henry’s Hunting Grounds. It was a clear day and the sun was just setting when we reached the Mountain, and I will never as long as I live forget that sight; such a park surrounded with flowers of all colors and descriptions. And right then I made up my mind to do all in my power to get a road to that Mountain so that the people could see that wonderland and inhale that invigorating Mountain air.

For twenty years I attended every County Convention. At first the people thought I was crazy when I mentioned a road to Mount Tacoma, but as years went by I had more and more followers. The Commissioners all promised to help, but each time failed me, so at last I decided to run for Commissioner myself, and was elected and the road was completed.”

Pictures are of the building of the Canyon Road, ca. 1919.

Building on the Canyon Rd.

Building on the Canyon Rd.

 

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