Eatonville Hospital – 1921
March 8, 2018 – 6:17 pm | No Comment

Here’s an old envelope from 1921 to Julie Dougher c/o of the the Eatonville Hospital. Don’t know anything about Julie — whether she was a nurse or a patient. (If you have any information, please …

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Margit Thorvaldson – A Most Progressive Woman (1928-2016)

Submitted by on September 9, 2016 – 6:06 pmNo Comment
Margit Thorvaldson

Margit Thorvaldson

As many already know, we recently lost a former teacher a dear member of the community, Margit Thorvaldson. Below was provided by Margit’s niece, Anne Kristoffersen.

July 19 1928 – August 27 2016

Margit Thorvaldson, age 88, passed away on August 27, 2016. She was predeceased by her parents Leif and Margit Thorvaldson, brother Leif Thorvaldson, niece Karen Kristoffersen, and her loving cat Petunia. She is survived by her sister Elsie Kristoffersen of Tacoma, nephew John Kristoffersen (Bernadette) of Walla Walla, niece Anne Kristoffersen (Charlie) of Tumwater, great-nephew Kristoffer Rice of Tacoma, great- niece Ann (LuAnn) of San Diego, CA; great-niece Nikki Hafezi (Feri) of Switzerland and great-great nieces Leilah, Lili, and Lola, great-nephew Jon Erik Kristoffersen (Randi) of Guam and great-great niece Sophia, and Norwegian cousins Bjorn Arve, Ase, Sigrun and their families.

Miss Thorvaldson was born in Rye, New York, on July 19, 1928. Her parents both emigrated from Norway in 1922. Her father was a master cabinet maker who built two alters for St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City.

Miss Thorvaldson graduated from New Paltz State Teacher’s College in New York in 1946.

Thorvaldsons take over

Thorvaldson family

In 1950, Miss Thorvaldson was hired as an elementary school teacher for the Eatonville School District. In the early 1950s, she was offered an opportunity to teach overseas for two years. She taught in Germany for one year and transferred to another teaching job in Libya for another year. Since the schools were located on Air Force Bases, she could catch a ride to just about anywhere in the region to explore other countries, specifically Egypt and around the Mediterranean Sea. Upon her return from overseas, she was rehired to her teacher’s position for Eatonville School District. For the next 37 years, Miss Thorvaldson built a reputation as a tough but fair English teacher dedicating countless hours to help educate her students. In her honor, the Senior classes of 1982 and 1987 dedicated their school annuals to her.

In 1989, Miss Thorvaldson retired. The Eatonville School District presented her with a plaque to be placed outside her classroom which states “This plaque is placed at the door of the classroom where Margit Thorvaldson taught at Eatonville High School from September 1950 to June 1989. It is given in thanks for her teaching, her love of learning, and her devotion to her students, challenging them to be the best they could be. It was in this classroom that she taught the children, the parents, and the grandparents of Eatonville”.

Through the years, Miss Thorvaldson crossed the Atlantic Ocean four times by ship, and countless times by air to her beloved ancestral home in Norway. Working with her cousin, Eva and her husband Olaf, they built a cabin on an ocean island, which she spent over 35 summers enjoying her home country and her Norwegian cousins and “Tantes” and “Onkels”.

First Bootstrap meeting and Editorial

First Bootstrap meeting and Editorial

Miss Thorvaldson remained active in the Eatonville community up until her passing. One of her more historic contributions was her University of Washington Master’s Thesis regarding the history and consolidation of the pioneer schools in the Eatonville area. This document was later used in the recorded history of “Operation Bootstrap”.

Operation Bootstrap was a joint venture between the University of Washington and the Town of Eatonville to determine what economic opportunities Eatonville might attract due to the closure of Eatonville Lumber Company. Miss Thorvaldson became a leading volunteer in this undertaking. Always being the teacher, she and her students were responsible for reproducing the historic interviews taken from various community members at the time. Today, this transcript, The Tacoma Eastern, is regarded as one of the most accurate historic references of this area.

Miss Thorvaldson’s philosophy was to strive to always be kind to people. She could never imagine living a better life than she had lived. She remained strong in body, hopeful and positive in mind, and very grateful for those in her life.

Elsie, Anne, and Kristoffer, would like to express their heartfelt thanks and appreciation for the support, love and assistance given to Miss Thorvaldson, especially in her last days, by her dear friends, Rich and Ruthie, “Angel” Elaine (Ron), and “Angel “Carol (Bob). We also extend thanks to all of Miss Thorvaldson’s many other dear friends, including Margo, Leona, Theresa, Kim, her neighbors, mail person, and former students in the Eatonville Community.  You made a big difference in her life and ours as well.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Animal Care of Eatonville (ACE), c/o Bob Walter, PO Box 131, Eatonville, WA 98328 or Eatonville Dollars for Scholars, PO Box 1155, Eatonville WA 98328.

A celebration of Miss Thorvaldson’s life will be held at the Ohop Grange 41608 Mountain Highway E Eatonville WA 98328 on October 30th from 1:30p – 5:00p .

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