The Early 1900s

LaGrande in the 1912-1950

Early home in LaGrande - no chimney, all electric
Early home in LaGrande – no chimney, all electric
Tacoma Power sign in LaGrande
Tacoma Power sign in LaGrande
Construction at LaGrande power station
Construction at LaGrande power station

 

Homes in the upper left, and Tacoma Power sign to the right
Homes in the upper left, and Tacoma Power sign to the right
A birds eye view of LaGrande, WA
A birds eye view of LaGrande, WA

We are lucky enough to have a great photos shared by Jeannie Woehl.

Her family had lived in LaGrande, Wash., when she was young and contacted Tacoma Power for any images that they might have. They provided her quite a few. Here is the first batch.

If anyone has any memories of that area, please feel free to share them below.

Photos courtesy of Jeannie Woehl.

Click on images to enlarge.

Clyde Williams (1971)

Clyde Williams 1971
Clyde Williams 1971

This shot of Clyde Williams was taken in 1971 by Joe Larin. You only have to search Clyde’s name on this blog to find out he and his family were a big piece of the community.

Clyde Williams and Frank Van Eaton, 1911
Clyde Williams and Frank Van Eaton, 1911

I’ve always liked this second shot of Clyde and Frank Van Eaton take at the Washington State Fair in 1908. The two boys look like they were less than happy to have their picture taken. And Clyde has about the same expression 60 years later.

Image courtesy of the Baublits family.

Click on images to enlarge.

Original Eatonville Schoolhouse

Original Eatonville School House
Original Eatonville School House

The original Eatonville schoolhouse was restored and sits next to Glacier View Park. Before it was restored though,  it looked like this. A bit more weathered and sporting a chimney.

I believe the two-story building to the right may be the Eatonville high school back in the day.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family.

Click on images to enlarge.

First School House (photo taken 2006)
First School House (photo taken 2006)

Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. (early 1900s) — Part 3 of 3

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Close up some of the crew at the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. 
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Taking down a log for the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. 
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Sawing down a tree for the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. 
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The crew at the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. in front of  a steam donkey. 
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Some of the crew standing in front of large tree taken down.
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Men standing outside the Elbe and Shingle Co. camp.
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View of the Elble Lumber & Shingle Co. camp.
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Taking down a big tree in Elbe.
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A different shot of the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. camp. 
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A close up on some of the men working for Elbe Lumber and Shingle. Co. 
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Close up on men working at that Elbe Lumber and Shingle Co. camp.
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Close up on the Elbe Lumber and Shingle Co. camp.
Logging for Elbe Lumber and Shingle Co.
Logging for Elbe Lumber and Shingle Co.

If you read the previous two posts, you’ll already know that last week on Ebay last week there was a wall card up for auction that I didn’t win. It had all sorts of shots of the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Company, as well as the logging camp and scene of the Tacoma Eastern Railroad.

Thankfully the seller broke down all the shots, so I can share them with you here. This will come in several sections. This is the third installment of three and features the lumber camp.

Let me know if you recognize anyone!

Click on images to enlarge.

Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. (early 1900s) — Part 2 of 3

Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co (Full view of wall card)
Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co (Full view of wall card)

On Ebay last week, there was a wall card up for auction, will all kinds of shots of the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Company, as well as the logging camp and scene of the Tacoma Eastern Railroad. Photos were taken by C. S. Reeves.

I didn’t win the auction, but thankfully the seller broke down all the shots, so I can share them with you here. This will come in several sections. This is the second installment.

Let me know if you recognize anyone!

Tacoma Eastern Railroad - locomotive
Tacoma Eastern Railroad – locomotive
Tacoma Eastern Railroad - locomotive
Tacoma Eastern Railroad – Close up
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Tacoma Eastern Railroad – and the men

acoma Eastern Railroad – Close up

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Tacoma Eastern

Click on images to enlarge.

Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. (early 1900s) — Part 1 of 3

Elbe Lumber and Shingle Mill
Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co.

On Ebay last week, there was a wall card up for auction, will all kinds of shots of the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Company, as well as the logging camp and scene of the Tacoma Eastern Railroad.

I didn’t win the auction, but thankfully the seller broke down all the shots, so I can share them with you here. This will come in several sections. This is the first installment.

Let me know if you recognize anyone!

Elbe Lumber and Shingle Mill - Steam Donkey
Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. – Steam Donkey

Click on images to enlarge.

Elbe Lumber and Shingle Mill - Steam Donkey - close up on men
Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. – Steam Donkey – close up on men
Elbe Lumber and Shingle Mill - Steam Donkey
Elbe Co. & Shingle Co. – Steam Donkey
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Steam donkey, close up. 

St. Paul – Tacoma Lumber Co. – Kapowsin Logging (ca. 1920s)

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Crew and steam donkey.

These are great shots taken in Kapowsin, and some by Kinsey, the professional photographer of the time, who went around a captured the Northwest logging era.

The first picture shows the crew, as well as a steam donkey off to the left. The second shot shows one of the men working through a large tree with a handsaw. (My shoulders get sore just looking at this picture.) If you look at the third picture you can see the logging camp nestled down there.

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Working hard on a large tree in Kapowsin.

St. Paul and the Tacoma Lumber Company were big players at the time.

Want to thank Sandra Wood for sharing these great shots. There are more to come. Her dad had kept them over the years and she is sharing them with us now.

Click on images to enlarge.

St. Paul camp
St. Paul camp

 

1912-1913 Eatonville High Catalog Ads

Eatonville School Catalogue 1912-1913 pgs. 18, 19
Eatonville School Catalogue 1912-1913 pgs. 18, 19

This comes to us from Terry Larson. She scanned these ads straight from the 1912-1913 Eatonville High School catalog.

Some familiar names here. And several of these business were brand new — had just started up in 1912:
C. A. Nettleton, butcher (set up shop in 1912)
• E. J. Reed, Tailor
Hotel Snow (built in 1912)
• E. A. Williams, ice cream parlor owner (launches business  in 1912)
Inter-Mountain Journal.

To give a little perspective on 1912 — it was the year Arizona was admitted as the 48th state and the Titanic sank.

Photo courtesy of Terry Larson.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Ingbrick and Marie Jacobson and Signe Keller

Jacobson Family
Jacobson Family

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, Ohop Valley was populated with Norwegians — like Ingbrick and Marie Jacobson and daughter Signe Keller. This family lived in one of the original homes still standing, near the Pioneer Farm.

In this shot of the valley, their farm is located in the upper right. You can see the barn clearly, although it has recently fallen.

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

Ohop Valley, between 1907 & 1920
Ohop Valley, between 1907 & 1920

 

Kapowsin High School 1928 Football Team

1928 Kapowsin Football Team
1928 Kapowsin Football Team

This 1928 article covered the first Kapowsin High School football team:

1 W. Bergt
2 L. Wiklund
3 McGee
4 Ed Erickson
5 Woodring
6 Command
7 Stanke
8 Nelson
9 Tibbitts
10 Hopkins
11 Wiklund
12 Wood
13 Zack, Mgr.
14 Bowers
15 Schuh
16 Miller
17 Harrison

18 Sumner Res. . . . . 0
12 Roy . . . . . . . . . . . 12
20 Buckley Res. . . . . 0
38 Gig Harbor . . . . . 14
20 Orting . . . . . . . . .  0
1 Fife . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
14 Vaughn . . . . . . . .  0

Foot ball was played for the first time at Kapowsin, and the eleven was coached by John Bigley (Washington). The first game even played in Kapowsin was with the Sumner Reserves and Kapowsin won, 18-0. Kapowsin won the Class B championship of Pierce County by winning four league games and accepting a forfeit from Fife.

If you’d like to own this article, the original is for sale on on ebay.com, just search Kapowsin. 

Click on image to enlarge.