The 30s, 40s and 50s

Paradise Lodge 1939

Paradise Lodge 1939
Paradise Lodge 1939

A peak at Paradise in 1939. It was a happening place up there, with live shows on the Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Mardora Dawkins says if you check under the carpets at the Paradise Inn you’ll find a fabulous hardwood floor that was used as a dance floor. Bem Dawkins (Jess Dawkin‘s father) installed it.

Photo courtesy of Madora Dawkins.

Paradise Inn 1939
Paradise Inn 1939

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Paradise Cabins 1939
Paradise Cabins 1939

Out on the Lawn at Peterson’s Place (1946)

Out at the Peterson Farm - 1946
Out at the Peterson Farm – 1946

Parents have been lining up their kids and taking pictures  since the dawn of the camera. Here’s a shot taken outside the originalTorger Peterson’s place around 1946.

Front, left to right: Linda Lewis, Sandy Seaman, Elaine Peterson, Marty Peterson

Back, left to right: Lillian Peterson, Helen Peterson, Alice Lewis, Carl Peterson, Pop [Pete?] Peterson, Al Lewis

Photo courtesy of Linda Lewis.

Click on image to enlarge.

Van Eaton’s Garage (ca.1947)

Van Eatons ca. 1950s
Van Eatons ca. 1950s

Before it was Eatonville Auto Center (on Mashell Ave. and Carter Street) it was Van Eaton’s garage. Here’s a great picture from the 50s. The cars have changed a bit and there aren’t any gas pumps, but you can still recognize the building.

To see some pictures of the building of the 1946 construction, just click HERE.

Pat Van Eaton says, “This was taken around 1947. Left to right is Bill Brainard, John Van Eaton, (unknown) and Clyde Williams. It was the Van Eaton and Brainard Kaiser Frazer dealership. They also sold Studebaker trucks, rototillers, Alice Chalmers farm tractors and Superior fire place inserts along with a Shell Oil gas distribution plant. Later they had a Union 76 distribution. Bill Brainard sold his interest in 1953 for $50,000 or about $447,000 in today’s dollars. WWII was over and people wanted everything.”

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Ohop Valley, Then and Then

Ohop Valley, between 1907 & 1920
Ohop Valley, between 1907 & 1920

Got these two RPPCs (real photo post cards) off Ebay of Ohop Valley. They show the early farms and their development. The first one was taken been 1907-1920, then second was a little later (ca. 1930s). The trees have grown in some, and another barn went up.

The RPPCs are a great piece of history — people capturing the pieces of history with their Kodak cameras. On the backs of the cards you came sometimes tell the date based on the printing. Here’s a resource if you’re curious about any of your RPPC dates. Real Photo Guide.

Photos courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Ohop Valley, ca. 1930
Ohop Valley, ca. 1930

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Eatonville’s Early Lumber Mill

Eatonville Lumber Mill
Eatonville Lumber Mill

Without the Eatonville Lumber Mill there wouldn’t have been an Eatonville. It was the industry that helped build the little community from a settlement to a town and employed up to 200 people.

If you look closely, you can see the rail cars loaded up with product. Also, to the right is the Eatonville Lumber Company store, which was used by everyone on in the community.

It shut down in the 1950s.

Photo Courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

EHS Dance (1942)

EHS Dance (ca. 1959)
EHS Dance (ca. 1959)

This picture of a Eatonville High School dance was taken in the 1940s. Cool decorations — a glass of bubbly on the wall. Live four-piece band too with saxophone player.

The person marked “ME” is Arne Haynes. He was a senior in this picture and he graduated in 1942.

Reminds me a bit of the Enchantment Under the Sea Dance from Back to the Future. Just me?

Photo courtesy of the Haynes family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Enchantment Under the Sea Dance from Back to the Future
Enchantment Under the Sea Dance from Back to the Future

Drive up to Mount Rainier (ca. 1920)

Drive to Rainier - ca. 1920
Drive to Rainier – ca. 1920

Folks have been driving up to Mount Rainier since there were wheels to get the up there.

If you’ve been up to Paradise, you’ll see breathtaking views of the mountain and fields of wildflowers. It wasn’t always so beautiful up there, in fact it sounds like it was a three-ring circus up there in the 1920s and 30s.

Here’s a quote from The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier.

“In 1923, the laundry and ice cream plant moved from Longmire to Paradise. In 1927, the Rainier Park Boat Company had a boat rental concession and general store at Reflection Lakes. By 1931, 275 cabins and golf course cover the present flower fields at Paradise. There was also a tent city, and snowshoe rental facility, the guide house, photo shop, a horse rental corral and barn, and the “Tatoosh Club” In the summer thers were also boys camps.”

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Couple Shots of Ohop Bob (early 1900s)

Early shot of Ohop Bob
Early shot of Ohop Bob

Ohop Bob was a fine dining establishment for decades. There are a number of photos of the place on this site, as well as a copy of the menu, in case you are wondering what you would have been eating back then.

Here are a couple more shots of the restaurant that burned down in the early 60s. The first shot is an earlier shot. You can tell not only by the shape of the building, but by the shrubs and trees that have grown up around it.

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Ohop Bob in later years
Ohop Bob in later years