The 30s, 40s and 50s

Eatonville Shoe & Repair Shot matchbook cover

Eatonville shoe repair matchbook
Eatonville shoe repair matchbook

Matchbook covers were, and still are, a popular way to promote a business. Here is a matchbook cover advertising the Eatonville Shoe & Repair Shop, probably in the 1940s. This is a time when logging was big business for the town because Highline & Bergman were known for their logging boots.

And an easy-to-remember number 128-J-2.

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

Paradise cabins

Paradise Cabins and Tatoosh Range Ashford
Paradise Cabins and Tatoosh Range Ashford

Hi,

I apologize for being away so long. But I’m back now, with a lot of great images of the Eatonville community, all the way up to Rainier.

Here is one image of the Paradise cabins and Tatoosh Range at the Mount Rainier National Park. As it turns out, this postcard — and the dense writing on the base — is currently for Sale on ebay.

Back of Paradise cabin postcard
Back of Paradise cabin postcard

I believe the photo was probably taken in the 1939. For more information, click here.

Click on images to enlarge.

Logging in National

Isaacson at National Logging
Isaacson blade used at National for logging

These images come from Sandra Wood, who found them in her father’s things. Since he logged up in National, she assumes they are from that area.

Enjoy!

Photos courtesy of Sandra Wood.

Click on images to enlarge.

Logging in National
Logging in National

 

 

Dick Fry (ca. late 50s)

Dick Fry at the Richfield service station
Dick Fry at the Richfield service station

This gentleman is Dick Fry. He’s pictured here working at the Richfield service station — located on Mashell Ave., where presently John Anderson operates AutoWorx.

Back then it was owned by Bud Anderson, who would later become the supervisor of the school bus garage. In 1958 I believe he sold it to Severson, who then it was sold to the Daniels family.

Richfield Station in early 60s
Richfield Station in early 60s

I love all the details in this shot — the clock and various products.

Photo courtesy of Jeff Morrison and Randy Stewart.

Click on images to enlarge.

1952 Basketball B Class Champions

Eatonville B Class Champions - 1952
Eatonville B Class Champions – 1952

This article ran in the Eatonville Dispatch in 1952. It begins with “The score books show that Eatonville High School basketball team, the second best “B” class team in the state of Washington.

The team was a testament to true sportsmanship and lead by Coach Ernest Cope.

Image courtesy of Dick Logston.

Click on image to enlarge.

1952 BB Team: J. B. Logston (manager), Eddie Kroft, Mickey Morrow, Jim Delgianni, Bob Olson, Albert Wehmhoefer, Ernie Jones, Phillip Balmer, Dick Logston, Charles Hale, Lamar Toulouse, Billy Budke (equipment mgr,) and the old master, coach Ernie Cope
1952 BB Team: J. B. Logston (manager), Eddie Kroft, Mickey Morrow, Jim Delgianni, Bob Olson, Albert Wehmhoefer, Ernie Jones, Phillip Balmer, Dick Logston, Charles Hale, Lamar Toulouse, Billy Budke (equipment mgr,) and the old master, coach Ernie Cope

National Mill, ca. 1940s

Panorama of National Mill
Panorama of National Mill

For those of you who find town of National, and the mill that used operate there, fascinating, then you’re in for a treat. This image comes from David Gestrid.  He says, “My dad was  born in National. My grandparents owned a service station there for quite a while.”

Section #1 of National Mill Panorama
Section #1 of National Mill Panorama

He adds that his dad had a hand drawn map of town that he donated to a museum in the area, or something similar. So, if anyone has any information on that, please let me know.

In the meantime, this picture hangs on David’s wall and is a panorama of the mill at National. The other shots are are closer looks are various sections of the photo.

The note at the top is more than a caption. It reads:

This panorama is just the mill yard, it does not include the sawmill building, lath mill, shingle mill, or the huge dry sheds used to store the finished lumber.

National Mill panorama, section #2
National Mill panorama, section #2

After forty years of operating, Mr. Demerest said when the army took his Japanese away who worked there, he would sell the mill for scrap. They came and loaded up my school friends, their parents and we never saw them again, in February 1942. 

This was the Pacific National Lumber Co., seven mile east of Elbe, Washington, all that is left of the mill and town is one house and a little church. The mill was a half mile long and a quarter mile wide, not including the town which was on the sound side of the hi-way, mill in flat south of the town.

National Mill panorama, section #3
National Mill panorama, section #3

It cut 280,000 to 300,000 board feet of lumber and timbers a day. Big timbers were its specialty. In 1943 they cut keels for mine sweeper 128 feet long.” 

Photos courtesy of David Gestrid.

Click on images to enlarge.

Redman Hall Indian

Redman Hall Head
Redman Hall Head, photo by Bob Walter.

The Redman Hall was once an important piece of the Eatonville community life. (It stood where the Landmark is now.) Over the years people met there forIORM meetings, auctions, dances, wrestling matches and more.

Now the indian head that adorned the building (yes, it was a different pre-PC era) is on display at the Van Eaton cabin. Bob Walter, president of the historical society, and who helped move it from Madora Dawkins home to the cabin, says, “It’s humongous, unique and it’s very heavy, so do not try to lift it up to get a better look at the back, because it will topple!”

It’s definitely worth checking out.

Photo courtesy of Bob Walter.

Click on images to enlarge.

Redman Hall (where Jebinos currently sits)
Redman Hall (where Landmark currently sits)

 

King’s Place Ad

King's Place Matchbook 1
King’s Place Matchbook 1

These matchbook covers for King’s Place are probably from the 1940s or early 1950s. My understanding is that three-digit phone numbers were only used prior to 1958. But I’m hardly an expert on the topic. Feel free to correct me.

King's Place Matchbook 2
King’s Place Matchbook 2

King’s Place was located near the Ohop Grange, and was a popular place to eat for decades.

If you want to read more on the history of the popular roadside diner, just click HERE.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

King's Place (ca. late 50s)
King’s Place (ca. late 50s)

 

1940 Letter from Congressman Coffee to Christensen

Coffee Letter to Christensen, 1940
Coffee Letter to Christensen, 1940

Kay Christensen Davis writes, “A letter from a congressman to my grandmother Harriet Christensen after the death of my grandfather Nels.”

The 1940 letter reads:

I have read with sadness of the tragic passing of your distinguished husband.

His was a career which meant much to the development of eastern Pierce County. Words fail me in attempting with sufficient meaning to convey to you my thought at this time. I want merely to let you know that my heard goes out to you and your family in your bereavement.

You can console yourself with the reflection that Mr. Christensen carved his monument on the hearts of men. By his example, he inspired the efforts of younger men to be as good a citizen as was he.

With warmest regard, I am

Cordially,

John M. Coffee

Gateway Inn (Ashford) – Then and Now

Gateway Inn, 1950s
Gateway Inn, 1950s

The Gateway Inn has been part of the local landscape for decades, located just outside the park entrance.

Here is a shot of it in the 1950s (judging by the cars). I love the signs over the doors – Steaks and Trout — and the pay phone off to the left.

The second shot, taken recently, comes off the Gateway Inn website, where the advertisement is probably similar to what printed 60 years ago. “Crackling fires, rustic cabins, and the natural wildlife awaits you at Gateway Inn, ideally situated in the majesty of Mount Rainier National Park.”

Gateway Inn 2016
Gateway Inn 2016

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.