The 30s, 40s and 50s

War Liquor Tax Fund – WLT (1945)

State check to Eatonville, 1945, WLT
State check to Eatonville, 1945, WLT

This check was issued by the State of Washington to the town of Eatonville on January 31, 1945. It represented monies from the War Liquor Tax Fund (WLT), which I believe is much the same as the state liquor tax.

The amount of $1,644.84, which doesn’t seem like much, would be in today’s dollars $21,856.50. And it was signed by Louis Grant, the town’s treasurer (and who would be elected school director in 1946). It was also endorsed by the Eatonville Bank cashier, George Hagen.

State check to Eatonville, 1945, WLT (back)
State check to Eatonville, 1945, WLT (back)

“Mr. George T. Hagen was transferred here from the First National Bank at Kirkland. Mr. Hagen’s assignment to Eatonville was to be a temporary one, but he had such a fine record during the first few months he was with the local bank that he remained for 27 years. He has been executive officer and director, cashier and now vice-president.” (History of Southeastern Pierce County, 1954)

He was the bank president for many years thereafter.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

LaGrande Gas Pump (1940s)

Gas pump in LaGrande, 1940s
Gas pump in LaGrande, 1940s

This wonderful image is provided courtesy of Jeannie Woehl and Tacoma Power. It looks like a single gas pump in LaGrande, Washington, probably from the 1940s while they were working on the dam. And, of course, based on the cars we can see.

If anyone has more light to shed on this image, please add a comment or two.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville in the 30s or 40s

View of Eatonville in the 40s
View of Eatonville in the 30s or 40s

Saundra Hill posted this shot of the town on the Eatonville History Facebook page.

She says, “Aerial view of Eatonville 1930’s or 1940’s. I found this in my grandma’s photos, Lila Puariea, who moved to Eatonville in 1935 on Scott Turner Road with husband Mose and children Elizabeth “Dode” Puariea Hill, Eugene “Bud” Puariea and Donna Puariea Deck.”

I like that you can see the steam coming from the burner at the Eatonville Lumber Company.

Click on image to enlarge.

LaGrande after the earthquake

Earthquake Slip, LaGrande, WA
Earthquake Slip, LaGrande, WA

This image shows the earthquake slip in LaGrande, Wash. I’m guessing this was the earthquake of April 29, 1949.

The Oregon Department of Geology states, “It was a magnitude 7.1, Olympia, eight killed and $150 million in damage in Washington, minor damage in Northwest Oregon. This was the largest and best documented quake in the Northwest and was felt over 230,000 square miles.”

There were reports of damage throughout Eatonville back then, including the High School and the liquor store and Otto Haynes said it fixed he clock in his car.

Photo courtesy of Jeannie Woehl and Tacoma Power.

Click on image to enlarge.

Snowy LaGrande – ca. early 50s

Snow covered gas station in LaGrande
Snow covered gas station in LaGrande
Check out the ice cicles, LaGrande
Check out the ice cicles, LaGrande

These LaGrande homes may not be standing any longer, but the these snowy shots will live on. The interesting thing about these images is that the residents were staying warm with electricity not wood (no chimneys), which was uncommon back then.

Thank you Jeannie Woehl for sharing.

Keeping warm with electricity in LaGrande
Keeping warm with electricity in LaGrande

These photos are part of the Tacoma Power Company collection.

Click on images to enlarge.

LaGrande in the 1912-1950

Early home in LaGrande - no chimney, all electric
Early home in LaGrande – no chimney, all electric
Tacoma Power sign in LaGrande
Tacoma Power sign in LaGrande
Construction at LaGrande power station
Construction at LaGrande power station

 

Homes in the upper left, and Tacoma Power sign to the right
Homes in the upper left, and Tacoma Power sign to the right
A birds eye view of LaGrande, WA
A birds eye view of LaGrande, WA

We are lucky enough to have a great photos shared by Jeannie Woehl.

Her family had lived in LaGrande, Wash., when she was young and contacted Tacoma Power for any images that they might have. They provided her quite a few. Here is the first batch.

If anyone has any memories of that area, please feel free to share them below.

Photos courtesy of Jeannie Woehl.

Click on images to enlarge.

FFA (ca. 1947)

FFA, ca. 1947
FFA, ca. 1947

I was eating at the Cruiser Cafe and saw my dad’s picture in one of the table photos. (If you haven’t eaten there, they have old Eatonville annual photos on the surfaces of all the tables.)

This one of the FFA (Future Farmers of America) was probably taken around 1947. The guy in the top row, far left, is Louie Mettler. The young man right below him is Frank Hoffman. The others I don’t know. Please feel free share if you know their names.

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

Louie Mettler Center, Frank Hoffman bottom
Louie Mettler Center, Frank Hoffman bottom

Barney’s Matchbook Cover

Matchbook Barney's (ca. 1950s)
Matchbook Barney’s (ca. 1950s)

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.

Matchbook Barney's reverse (ca. 1950s)
Matchbook Barney’s reverse (ca. 1950s)

I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.

Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother and he opened the establishment when he got back from WWII — a survivor of Pearl Harbor.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

Margit Thorvaldson – A Most Progressive Woman (1928-2016)

Margit Thorvaldson
Margit Thorvaldson

As many already know, we recently lost a former teacher a dear member of the community, Margit Thorvaldson. Below was provided by Margit’s niece, Anne Kristoffersen.

July 19 1928 – August 27 2016

Margit Thorvaldson, age 88, passed away on August 27, 2016. She was predeceased by her parents Leif and Margit Thorvaldson, brother Leif Thorvaldson, niece Karen Kristoffersen, and her loving cat Petunia. She is survived by her sister Elsie Kristoffersen of Tacoma, nephew John Kristoffersen (Bernadette) of Walla Walla, niece Anne Kristoffersen (Charlie) of Tumwater, great-nephew Kristoffer Rice of Tacoma, great- niece Ann (LuAnn) of San Diego, CA; great-niece Nikki Hafezi (Feri) of Switzerland and great-great nieces Leilah, Lili, and Lola, great-nephew Jon Erik Kristoffersen (Randi) of Guam and great-great niece Sophia, and Norwegian cousins Bjorn Arve, Ase, Sigrun and their families.

Miss Thorvaldson was born in Rye, New York, on July 19, 1928. Her parents both emigrated from Norway in 1922. Her father was a master cabinet maker who built two alters for St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City.

Miss Thorvaldson graduated from New Paltz State Teacher’s College in New York in 1946.

Thorvaldsons take over
Thorvaldson family

In 1950, Miss Thorvaldson was hired as an elementary school teacher for the Eatonville School District. In the early 1950s, she was offered an opportunity to teach overseas for two years. She taught in Germany for one year and transferred to another teaching job in Libya for another year. Since the schools were located on Air Force Bases, she could catch a ride to just about anywhere in the region to explore other countries, specifically Egypt and around the Mediterranean Sea. Upon her return from overseas, she was rehired to her teacher’s position for Eatonville School District. For the next 37 years, Miss Thorvaldson built a reputation as a tough but fair English teacher dedicating countless hours to help educate her students. In her honor, the Senior classes of 1982 and 1987 dedicated their school annuals to her.

In 1989, Miss Thorvaldson retired. The Eatonville School District presented her with a plaque to be placed outside her classroom which states “This plaque is placed at the door of the classroom where Margit Thorvaldson taught at Eatonville High School from September 1950 to June 1989. It is given in thanks for her teaching, her love of learning, and her devotion to her students, challenging them to be the best they could be. It was in this classroom that she taught the children, the parents, and the grandparents of Eatonville”.

Through the years, Miss Thorvaldson crossed the Atlantic Ocean four times by ship, and countless times by air to her beloved ancestral home in Norway. Working with her cousin, Eva and her husband Olaf, they built a cabin on an ocean island, which she spent over 35 summers enjoying her home country and her Norwegian cousins and “Tantes” and “Onkels”.

First Bootstrap meeting and Editorial
First Bootstrap meeting and Editorial

Miss Thorvaldson remained active in the Eatonville community up until her passing. One of her more historic contributions was her University of Washington Master’s Thesis regarding the history and consolidation of the pioneer schools in the Eatonville area. This document was later used in the recorded history of “Operation Bootstrap”.

Operation Bootstrap was a joint venture between the University of Washington and the Town of Eatonville to determine what economic opportunities Eatonville might attract due to the closure of Eatonville Lumber Company. Miss Thorvaldson became a leading volunteer in this undertaking. Always being the teacher, she and her students were responsible for reproducing the historic interviews taken from various community members at the time. Today, this transcript, The Tacoma Eastern, is regarded as one of the most accurate historic references of this area.

Miss Thorvaldson’s philosophy was to strive to always be kind to people. She could never imagine living a better life than she had lived. She remained strong in body, hopeful and positive in mind, and very grateful for those in her life.

Elsie, Anne, and Kristoffer, would like to express their heartfelt thanks and appreciation for the support, love and assistance given to Miss Thorvaldson, especially in her last days, by her dear friends, Rich and Ruthie, “Angel” Elaine (Ron), and “Angel “Carol (Bob). We also extend thanks to all of Miss Thorvaldson’s many other dear friends, including Margo, Leona, Theresa, Kim, her neighbors, mail person, and former students in the Eatonville Community.  You made a big difference in her life and ours as well.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Animal Care of Eatonville (ACE), c/o Bob Walter, PO Box 131, Eatonville, WA 98328 or Eatonville Dollars for Scholars, PO Box 1155, Eatonville WA 98328.

A celebration of Miss Thorvaldson’s life will be held at the Ohop Grange 41608 Mountain Highway E Eatonville WA 98328 on October 30th from 1:30p – 5:00p .