1910

Eatonville Lumber Company 1908

Eatonville Lumber Company 1908
Eatonville Lumber Company 1908

What’s interesting about this 1908 shot of the Eatonville Lumber Company is the burner. Most times the shots are of a domed burner (aka wigwam burner), which was built  in 1932 after the 1st mill burned down.

The mill is brand new in the picture, built in 1907. No sooner was it up and running, there were financial difficulties and new management was needed. The Bank of California hired T. S. Galbraith to operate the mill. He came to Eatonville in the fall of 1909 and his family moved up the following year.

Galbraith would go on to play a major roll in the town for years to follow.

Photo courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Eatonville’s Animal Ordinances

Hotel Snow with cow
Hotel Snow with cow

Eatonville residents often complain that the deer are eating their flowers. It could be worse. A hundred years ago it was cows and horses in your yard. Here are just some of Eatonville’s animal ordinances

Horse & Cow
March 1911 — Eatonville’s Horse and Cow Ordinance is amended “to allow cows to roam at large during the day”.

August, 1911 Mr. Rivers asks the City Council to restrict cows from running at large at night. The cowbells are keeping citizen from getting a good night’s sleep. The Council declares the cows a public nuisance and the Marshall must notify the cow owners.

March 1912 — Citizens petition the Council that ranging livestock be prohibited, but the Council votes down their request. Undeterred, Councilman Overmire submits a second ordinance to prohibit “the ranging of horses, cattle and chickens.” This ordinance is also voted down. Finally, Councilman Jackson comes up with an ordinance that applies to only horses and cows and only for those running at night. This ordinance passes, but it’s unclear whether the residents are happy with the compromise.

Groe (now Center) Street  1914
Groe (now Center) Street 1914

Chickens
March 1911 — A Chicken Ordinance is passed and repealed, but in February 1913, chickens are officially curtailed. The Clerk instructs a notice to appear in an official paper publicizing the date chickens are no longer allowed to run at large.

Horses
January 1910 — Ordinance passes limiting the speed of horses “and vehicles of any description” to six miles per hour.

Cow Stench
June 1916 — Mr. Smith goes before the Council and demands steps are taken to improve the sanitary conditions on Groe Street (now Center St.). He is unable to keep tenants because of the stench coming from a local dairy barn.

Rabbits
March 1912 — The Marshal and City Clerk are authorized to shoot any rabbits running at large within the city limits.

Mashell Ave ca 1914
Mashell Ave ca 1914

Pheasants
October 1911 — Chinese Pheasants are destroying vegetable gardens and the Mayor authorizes the Marshal to appoint deputies to kill them. Shooting is allowed from Washington Avenue west to the town limits, and from Railroad Ave. north to the town limits. The deputies receive no pay, but they do get to keep the dead pheasants.

Rats
March 1911 — T.C. Van Eatontells the Council something has to be done about the rats. The Council puts a bounty of ten cents (about $2.50 today) on each rat. “When captured they should be presented o the Town Clerk who will draw an order on the Town Treasurer for the amount due.”  (Grim news for the Town Clerk.)

Records show that payments ranged from $1.40 to $13.80. There must have been some success in cleaning up the town. By September 1916, the rat bounty was dropped from the town’s budget.

(Information taken from the History of the Tacoma Eastern Area.)

Photos Courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

July 4 1910 and 2011

Redman Hall, ca  July 4,1910
Redman Hall, ca July 4,1910

Nothing stops Eatonville when it comes to 4th of July parades. Even though these two pictures were taken over 100 years apart, it appears we still like the same kinds of cars we did back then.

This first picture is on Mashell. The Redman Hall (building on the far left) sits where Jebino’s parking lot is today, and the house beside is the restaurant sits.

The second picture, was taken on Orchard. The parade had to be moved this year because the Mashall Ave. was being paved.

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton and Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

Old cars coming down Orchard during 2011 4th of July parade
Old cars coming down Orchard during 2011 4th of July parade

First Town Meeting (1910)

Hearn Jewelry on corner of Mashell
Hearn Jewelry on corner of Mashell

The first meeting of the Eatonville town council was held July 14, 1910 at Joseph Hearn’s jewelry store. (You may know it better today as Eatonville Outdoor.

Mr. Hearn, a member of the council, was appointed to a committee to inspect lots for a site for the Town Hall, and to find out how much a lot would cost. At the next meeting, Hearn reported that T. C. Van Eaton was selling lots for $150 cash (about $3,300 today) or on an installment plan.

The council decided to go for it and the council received a deed from T. C. on January 28, 1910. Building plans go underway. Bill #31 was received from the Eatonville Lumber Company in March for $455.91 (around $10,052 today).

Hearn Jewelry, better known today at Eatonville Outdoor
Hearn Jewelry, better known today at Eatonville Outdoor

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

Three-Wheel Logging Truck

Early three-wheel logging truck
Early three-wheel logging truck

I’m not sure what is more amazing about this Eatonville logging photo: the hard rubber tires, the fact that this vehicle only has three tires, or the size of the log, which looks like it could easily crush this early logging truck.

Logging trucks started showing up in the early 1900’s. I don’t know anything about this particular model, but it shows up on other history sites, like one about nearby  logging in Sammamish.

Interesting fact: Many of the early logging trucks had no doors on the driver’s side. Why? Because early trucks had almost no brakes. If a truck suddenly lost control coming down a hill, the driver needed to be able to quickly bail out.

Another interesting fact: Loggers were cutting more spruce trees in the 1910s because that’s what airplanes were made out of then. Spruce logging for airplanes became particularly important once America entered WWI in 1917.

Old Sammamish logging truck
Old Sammamish logging truck

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Hiking at Mountain — in dresses

Marie Lutkins Drussel (in white hat) with friends on a Mt. Rainier glacier
Marie Lutkens Drussel (in white hat) with friends on a Mt. Rainier glacier

Who says you need fancy hiking gear for climbing around on glaciers. These women were doing it wearing dresses and carrying nothing more than walking sticks around 1910.

The woman in the white hat is Marie Lutkens Drussel. Her dad Henry Lutkens, an original settler in Elbe, who helped build the Lutkens Hotel with Chas. Lutkens in 1894.

The hotel was a log building with an enormous porch that ran the length of the building and tourists could relax and watch the Nisqually River flow by.

Henry Lutkens, was quite the fisherman and kept the hotel well stocked in trout from the Nisqually.

Lutkens Hotel, built in 1894
Lutkens Hotel, built in 1894

Photos courtesy of the Eatonville Historical Society.

Click on images to enlarge.

Ruth Anderson Postcard – Mashell Ave. 1910

Anderson Postcard, of Mashell Ave., 1910 1910
Anderson Postcard, of Mashell Ave., 1910

This postcard was mailed 101 years ago to Miss Ruth Anderson.

If I’m reading the card right, the writer is telling Ruth this is a fine town.  I’m not sure this picture postcard of Mashell Ave. would do much to entice people to stop by though.

Photo courtesy of Debbie and Gary Saint.

Click to enlarge photos.

Anderson Postcard Side #2, 1910
Anderson Postcard Side #2, 1910