1923

Clara (Fiander) Jensen and John Jensen Out Hunting (ca. 1910)

Clara (Fiander) Jensen and John Jensen out hunting
Clara (Fiander) Jensen and John Jensen out hunting

Clara (Fiander) Jensen was known for her hunting skills. In fact, her hunting prowess was covered by Sunset Magazine in 1923. Although folks who read the article may know her for tracking cats, she was a big part of the community for her entire life.

She’s pictured here with her husband John Jensen. They were married in 1902.

Click on image to enlarge.

Photo courtesy of Kathi Henderson, Clara’s granddaughter.

Picture of Clara Jensen that appeared in Sunset Magazine. Pelt is of the 45-pound wildcat she took down.
Picture of Clara Jensen that appeared in Sunset Magazine. Pelt is of the 45-pound wildcat she took down.

 

National Geographic show, Dirty Rotten Survival will have Graeber logging photo

Griffih & Graeber Logging (1923)
Griffih & Graeber Logging (1923)

Some of the logging images on this site, specifically one of the Griffith and Graeber 1923 logging crew image, caught the attention of National Geographic.

They will be using the shot in a new series, Dirty Rotten Survival. Catch the episode October 27 on the National Geographic Channel.

Hope you can catch it.

Photo courtesy of Graeber family.

Click on image to enlarge. 

Dirty Rotten Survival show
Dirty Rotten Survival show

Rainier National Park Travelogue (1923)

Rainier National Park Travelogue 1923, back pg.
Rainier National Park Travelogue 1923, back pg.

This Rainier National Park Travelogue let climbers record their climbs. They included:
• The Sky-Line Trail — Saddle Horse
Summit Climb — afoot
Nisqually Glacier Trip — afoot
Paradise-Stevens Glacier Trip — afoot
Muir Camp Trip — afoot.
Pinnacle Peak Climb — afoot.

This travelogue is dated 1923 (over 80 years ago), the same year the first baseball game was played at Yankee Stadium. 

I trust there will still be climbers 80 years from now in 2094.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Rainier Pg2Click on images to enlarge.

1923 Calendar from Christensen’s Dept. Store

1923 Calendar from Christensen's Dept. Store
1923 Calendar from Christensen’s Dept. Store

Thank you Steve Burwash for sharing this great find—a 1923 calendar from Christensen’s Department Store. (This is the same year Transcontinental airmail service begins and Elmer Rice’s “Adding Machine” premieres in NYC.)

Here’s a shot too of what the store looked like back then.

The falls in the calendar are Wild Cat Falls. It’s still a popular fishing hole. Here’s what they have to says on HookandBullet.com.

“Wildcat Falls is a falls located just 1.5 miles from Eatonville, in Pierce County, in the state of Washington, United States, near Eatonville Junction, WA. Whether you’re baitcasting, fly fishing or spinning your chances of getting a bite here are good. So grab your favorite fly fishing rod and reel, and head out to Wildcat Falls.”

Center Street around 1926
Center Street around 1926

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler

Click on image to enlarge.

 

 

Clara Jensen (ca. 1900)

Clara Jensen
Clara Jensen

Clara (Fiander) Jensen made quite the impact on the rural community. She was born in 1883 and raised in the Swan Lake area on the family farm. She lived out her life in the small community.

She was an attractive women, and could hunt cats too. Sunset Magazine published a story in 1923 about her skills and she enjoyed hunting well into her 70s.

To read more about this woman, just click HERE.

Photo courtesy of the Jensen family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Picture of Clara Jensen that appeared in Sunset Magazine. Pelt is of the 45-pound wildcat she took down.
Picture of Clara Jensen that appeared in Sunset Magazine. Pelt is of the 45-pound wildcat she took down.

Peterson 8th Grade Certificate of Graduation (1923)

Helen Peterson's Certificate of 8th grade graduation
Helen Peterson’s Certificate of 8th grade graduation

Helen Peterson’s 1923 eighth grade Certificate of Graduation has a lot of interesting information.

• Grades were listed right there on the certificate.
• Agriculture was one of the major subjects.
• Certificates were signed by county superintendents.

Lesson to all — keep your grades up. You never know if someone is going to show them around 90 hears later.

Images courtesy of Linda Lewis.

Helen Peterson (1923)
Helen Peterson (1923)

Click on image to enlarge. 

Drive up to Mount Rainier (ca. 1920)

Drive to Rainier - ca. 1920
Drive to Rainier – ca. 1920

Folks have been driving up to Mount Rainier since there were wheels to get the up there.

If you’ve been up to Paradise, you’ll see breathtaking views of the mountain and fields of wildflowers. It wasn’t always so beautiful up there, in fact it sounds like it was a three-ring circus up there in the 1920s and 30s.

Here’s a quote from The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier.

“In 1923, the laundry and ice cream plant moved from Longmire to Paradise. In 1927, the Rainier Park Boat Company had a boat rental concession and general store at Reflection Lakes. By 1931, 275 cabins and golf course cover the present flower fields at Paradise. There was also a tent city, and snowshoe rental facility, the guide house, photo shop, a horse rental corral and barn, and the “Tatoosh Club” In the summer thers were also boys camps.”

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Griffith & Graeber Logging Trucks (early 1920s)

Griffith & Graeber logging trucks lined up in the woods
Griffith & Graeber logging trucks lined up in the woods

We’re fortunate that the Graeber family has these wonderful 1920s photos from the Griffith & Graeber logging company. Here we see a lineup of the trucks loaded up and ready to leave the woods — wide angle lens to less.

The early 20s was an exciting time when it came to technology. The first domestic refrigerator was sold in Sweden and the US has just developed the first portable radio. Today you can get satellite radio in your truck, along with a 12-volt beverage cooler.

For a better look at these tractor-like trucks, just click HERE.

Photo courtesy of the Graeber family.

Click on image to enlarge.