1946

Steve Burwash – Brooder house (ca. 1946 – 2014)

Steve Burwash — Pig Slaughter ca. 1945
Steve Burwash — Pig Slaughter ca. 1945

This is the Kjelstad farm back around 1946 and Steve Burwash (today 93 years old) in the middle of a pig slaughter. (Yes, you have to get your bacon somewhere.)

Behind him in the brooder house where they raised the small chicks. The second photo is the brooder house today — almost 70 years later.

Other things to note: Frank, the beloved horse, in gear for working on the farm. Also, the pipes to Steve’s left were probably used for drainage. Steve said they used pipe to help with valley flooding. You’ll find old drainage pipes like these around many of the Ohop Valley farms.

Photo courtesy of the Burwash family and Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

Brooder House - 2014
Brooder House – 2014

Overhead view of Eatonville, 1946

Overhead view of Eatonville 1946
Overhead view of Eatonville 1946

This picture of Eatonville ran in a paper September 1, 1946.

Caption with Picture:  Eatonville, named for T. C. Van Eaton, who platted its townsite in 1888, was in early days surrounded by dense, virgin forest. Its location on the line of the old Tacoma Eastern Railroad made it one of Washington’s most important lumber-producing and log-shipping centers. The largest part of the merchantable timber has been logged, off, however, and Eatonville it today largely dependent upon agriculture for revenue and employment, although some logging and lumbering operations still continue to the present.

You can zoom in and really see the details like the school, the mill, Mashell Ave., Washington Ave. etc.

The year 1946 is an important one to my family. My grandparents bought the dairy in Ohop Valley (not pictured) from the John and Lena Malm that year.

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge. 

Ashford Grade School

Ashford Grade School
Ashford Grade School

Below is an excerpt from Doug Evan’s “Doug’s Rainier Blog“, an also a former student from Ashford who knew what long bus rides were like. In many ways, things haven’t changed much since 1946.

“Getting to school from Longmire was not always easy and , on occasion, could be very interesting. During my twelve years of school at Ashford Grade School and Eatonville High School, 1934-1946, we Mount Rainier kids caught the school bus each morning about 7:00 AM, either at the park headquarters building, or some years during World War II the bus only came up as far as the Nisqually Entrance.

Parents took turns driving us down and picking us up in the evenings at Gateway Inn. During most of my grade school days we lived up at the mill site of the Paradise Mining and Milling Co., and so I had an extra two miles to go, usually with my dad who drove to Longmire to work each morning in our 1929 Model A Ford. In winter the road was usually plowed early up beyond the mill site, but occasionally it wasn’t, and if the night’s accumulation of snow was a foot or more, we had to walk. Yes, I actually did walk two miles through a foot of snow to get to school, but rarely.

Getting to and from Eatonville High School entailed seventy miles on the bus each day. We used this time variously: snoozing, reading, chatting, quarreling, singing, and shooting craps. Yes, one of the boys from National made a small portable crap table over which lunch money ebbed and flowed. This was all during World War II, so the popular music of the day was dominated by patriotic and romantic songs, often laments for husbands and lovers who were overseas in the military. These were the songs commonly heard on the bus ride to and from Eatonville.

Another aspect of that bus ride was the abundant army traffic on the road. Convoys of army trucks were common and could slow the flow of traffic for miles. Occasional companies of marching recruits were strung out along the road between Longmire and Elbe, sometimes in rain or snow. One morning an army tank misjudged a sharp curve near the old town of Alder and was stuck nose down over a steep bank.

So, I think it’s safe to say that those two hours each day on the school bus were not boring. I have fond memories of it. It ended with my graduation in the EHS Class of 1946; there were 37 of us. We had a delightful 50th reunion party in Eatonville in 1996.”

 

Out on the Lawn at Peterson’s Place (1946)

Out at the Peterson Farm - 1946
Out at the Peterson Farm – 1946

Parents have been lining up their kids and taking pictures  since the dawn of the camera. Here’s a shot taken outside the originalTorger Peterson’s place around 1946.

Front, left to right: Linda Lewis, Sandy Seaman, Elaine Peterson, Marty Peterson

Back, left to right: Lillian Peterson, Helen Peterson, Alice Lewis, Carl Peterson, Pop [Pete?] Peterson, Al Lewis

Photo courtesy of Linda Lewis.

Click on image to enlarge.

Van Eaton’s Garage (ca.1947)

Van Eatons ca. 1950s
Van Eatons ca. 1950s

Before it was Eatonville Auto Center (on Mashell Ave. and Carter Street) it was Van Eaton’s garage. Here’s a great picture from the 50s. The cars have changed a bit and there aren’t any gas pumps, but you can still recognize the building.

To see some pictures of the building of the 1946 construction, just click HERE.

Pat Van Eaton says, “This was taken around 1947. Left to right is Bill Brainard, John Van Eaton, (unknown) and Clyde Williams. It was the Van Eaton and Brainard Kaiser Frazer dealership. They also sold Studebaker trucks, rototillers, Alice Chalmers farm tractors and Superior fire place inserts along with a Shell Oil gas distribution plant. Later they had a Union 76 distribution. Bill Brainard sold his interest in 1953 for $50,000 or about $447,000 in today’s dollars. WWII was over and people wanted everything.”

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville Buildings Now and Then

Mashell Ave. ca 1946
Mashell Ave. ca 1946

Many of the shops and buildings in Eatonville have had previous lives. Here are just a few.

Napa:  The part store has also been a pool hall, a bowling alley, a bakery and a church. The owner says if you are up in the attic you can see the glass from the church and there are still bakery vats underneath.

PostNet: People have been coming there since it was a bakery, a TV and appliance repair shop, Kneip’s Trucking, and rumor has it a funeral parlor.

Eatonville Outdoor: Not long ago it was an antique shop. For years it was the town’s post office, and very early on it was a jewelry store.

Lumbermans Hospital - Mashell Ave.
Lumbermans Hospital - Mashell Ave.

Cruiser Café: If you’d been around in the early 1900s, you would have stopped by to visit Dr. Bridge. He was the resident doctor and also the founder of Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital (named after his mother.)

Fitness Center: Today you work up a sweat in there. In the early 1900s you were more likely to work up a sweat watching swashbuckling Douglas Fairbanks on the screen. It also had a previous life as the Pentecostal Church, Eagles Hall and Eatonville Furniture.

Jebinos: Many of you may remember purchasing cars at the Van Eaton Chevrolet dealership.

Cinderblock building next to Napa: That old cinderblock building used to be the Dispatch headquarters. Much earlier though it was a car dealership and Sid Dow’s body shop.

Center St. Shop Rite ca 1975
Center St. Shop Rite ca 1975

Home on the Corner of Mashell across from the School: This home was used as a hospital in the early 1900s.

Medical Billing Center: For years people went there for groceries when it was Malcom’s Shop Rite.

Tall Timbers Restaurant: Originally it was built as a garage.

The Pour House: In the early 1900s it was T. C. Van Eaton’s realty office, where he sold lots with easy $5 and $10 a month payments. Later it was a candy store and then the Olympia Tavern.

Sears: In the 1950s you would have called it Christensen’s Motors.

The Pour House when it sold candy in 1916
The Pour House when it sold candy in 1916

Dawns Floral: In the 1960s there were no flowers to be bought, but you could have set yourself up with a new Dodge.

Double T Meats: Mostly recently it was a pizza parlor, but earlier it was a candy shop and a cleaners.

Countryside Real Estate: Early on the building was two stories. It housed nurses’ quarters and a clinic. A dentist set up shop there as well.

Thank you Pat Van Eaton for setting me straight on a few of these.

Click on images to enlarge.

Above Eatonville in 1946 & 2012

Eatonville, 9/1/46
Eatonville, 9/1/46

Check this out — Eatonville on September 1, 1946. And compare it against this shot taken in August 2010, by Bob Walter when he was up with Steve Van Cleve flying around.

It’s not exactly the same angle, but you can still spot some of the landmarks. And although there has been a lot built since 1946, you’ll notice in the right hand corner of the older shot, the Eatonville Lumber Mill in full production, which is no longer there.

If you want to get your hands on the original of the 1946 photo, you can purchase it on ebay. The other, you’ll have to ask Bob.

Click on images to enlarge.

Town of Eatonville - August 2012
Town of Eatonville - August 2012

Eatonville Center of Hunt for Lost Airplane (December 1946)

Walter Winchell
Walter Winchell

This article ran in the Eatonville Dispatch, December 19, 1946.

Eatonville Center of Hunt for Lost Airplane

Eatonville was “in the news” for a brief period last week end.

Walter Winchell, the New York radio gossipeer, gave it out in his Sunday evening broadcast that the lost plane with its 32 Marines aboard, had been discovered by Chief of Police Harry Comber of Eatonville on the Rimrocks, a few miles north of here and the sensational “news” was diffused all over the United States.

Mr. Comber’s bomb, however, turned out to be a dud. Nothing was found on the Rimrocks but the usual rocks and other scenery. On Tuesday Comber was again quoted on the radio news this time to the effect that he and others mistook some reflection on a mineral surface for the wings and fuselage of the plane through the glass they used.

The chief’s alarm on the phone brought the state patrol, the coast guard, the army, newspaper representative, airplanes and searchlights, including a helicopter from McChord Field, about 30 men altogether, including a radio transmitter and receiving station which was set up on Mashell Avenue.

Eatonville story of missing airmen
Eatonville story of missing airmen

The hunt on the Rimrocks began after dark Sunday night and was continued until 3 o’clock in the morning and again the next day until the searchers were satisfied there was nothing there.

A reporter from the Seattle P.I. and another from the International News Service were among the cotsiders. The party wanted something to eat and drink during the night, but all restaurants were colosed. They got hot coffee anyway — George Hlavin invited them all to the Sport Shop and served them coffee there about midnight.

Another futile search ended Wednesday night, after mysterious fired had been reported by a farmer in Pleasant Valley and investigation was made in the Bald hills between here and Yelm. The hunt has been temporarily called off and a conference is being held in Seattle to co-ordinate all information and determine what to do next.

1946 article from Dispatch (page 2)
1946 article from Dispatch (page 2)

More than two-score search planes scanned the Mount Rainier area Thursday, with the help of the first fair weather since the plane was downed in a storm nearly a week ago. The army contributed 29 planes to the search, the navy 14 and the coast guard three.

The pilots reported no success and said they were hampered by a haze near the ground. Coast guard authorities believe the plane was forced down on Nisqually glacier on the towering peak.

Earlier int he day a searching party scoured the rugged country four miles north of Eatonville in vain after a state fire patrolman had reported seeing an object that might be a plane’s fuselage near Ohop lake.

The area was on the direct air line from San Diego to Seattle — the route the plane was following when it was last heard from.

International News Service Correspondent Gene Schroeder accompanied Lt. Comdr. R. W. Finley of the coast guard and Lt. (jg) R. J. Evans as they fought their way to the scene over jagged rocks and through tangled underbrush. The only object they found was an old logging operation, which they believed could have been mistaken for wreckage.

The names of those on the last plane have not been made public.

 

Eatonville Redmen Basketball team (1946-47)

Eatonville Redmen, 1946-47
Eatonville Redmen, 1946-47

I’m making the jump that this was the Red Men Hall’s basketball team. The appeared to do well during the 1946-47 season in the Pierce County A.A.U. Tri-County League.

The Redmen Hall sat where the Landmark’s parking lot is today.

Abbi Wonacott writes: “The Red Men Hall, built in 1905, was used by more than just the members who built it. It was a multipurpose center of sorts. Many times meetings are referred to as being held at the hall. Its primary function was to house the Improved Order of Red Men, Nisqually Tribe #81, of Eatonville.

Though by today’s standards, it appears to be a mockery, like “playing Indians.” In practice, this group of men met to uphold important values of patriotism as those who dressed, as Indians and dumped tea into the Boston Harbor. They held charity events, raised money for those in need, and sponsored a baseball team. The Red Men Hall was a two story building constructed by the dedicated membership of 150 men in 1905.”

Photo courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

The Galbraiths & the Hills

Galbraith and Hills Christmas Cards
Galbraith and Hills Christmas Cards

This post comes from David Breneman:

John Galbraith was my grandfather’s best friend. My grandfather, William Hill, managed the Standard Oil depot in Eatonville. The last time I was in town, it was still there, as was my grandparents’ house, a couple blocks away from the Galbraiths’.

When the Galbraiths left Eatonville, they moved into the vacation house they had built in the 1930s in Rosedale, near Gig Harbor. In 1946, my grandparents bought a house across Lay Inlet from the Galbraiths’. Both houses were built by the same man, a retired boat builder name Combs. When the Galbraiths sent out a photo Christmas card in the 1940s, my grandfather countered with a parody Christmas card of the barn in his own yard.

Image courtesy of David Breneman.

Click on image to enlarge.