The Early 1900s

Little Mashell Postcard (early 1900s)

Little Mashell Falls postcard
Little Mashell Falls postcard

This postcard of the Little Mashell is pretty interesting. The side with the falls is nice, but it’s the other side, that is entitled Paradise Valley Route, that is even more curious. It’s a shot of farms. Alder? Elbe? Any guesses, anyone?

Anyone have a guess.

Click on images to enlarge.

Little Mashell (back)
Little Mashell (back)

Dr. Bridge’s Lumberman’s Hospital – April 30, 1912

Lumberman's Hospital, April 1912
Lumberman’s Hospital, April 1912

We have an new photo provided to us by Elaine Burch. The image is of Dr. Bridge’s Lumberman’s Hospital, which was located on Mashell. (The building still stands across from the high school.)

What’s amazing about this picture is not only that it exists and the names were written on the back . . . but that Elaine found this photo at a garage sale in Illinois in an old album. Which goes to show, you never know.

The back of this photo reads:

Eatonville, Washington April 30, 1912

Lumberman's Hospital (back), 1912
Lumberman’s Hospital (back), 1912

Sitting on the stairs are
Dickson, Joef & Mr. Luck
Standing are: Dr. Bridge, Montonegry (?), Erickson (Swedish) Tony (Italian), Mrs. Canty, Lars A., Mr. Okrey, Mrs. Martines (cook), Mrs. Luck.
(I may have these names misspelled. In anyone knows the correct spellings, please let me know.)

For those that would like to read a little more on this hospital and Dr. Bridge, please click here.

Photo courtesy of Elaine Burch.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

Little Eatonville spoon – 1920s

1920s Eatonville spoon
1920s Eatonville spoon

This little sterling silver spoon, about 3″ long, engraved with the words Eatonville, was probably given away by one of the shops in Eatonville in the 1920s (per Terry Van Eaton).

If anyone has any idea which shop, please free free to comment. One suggestion was the Hearon Jewelry store. 

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

1914 Eatonville/Longmire Postcard

Little Mashell Falls

This little piece of history was just for sale on Ebay. It’s a postcard from W. Harding to Elsie Holgate in Longmire Springs (the area seven miles outside Mount Rainier National Park).  It’s a shot of the Little Mashel (Mashell) Falls, which is still a popular hiking spot today on Pack Forest property.

This is extra special because Longmire Springs is relatively unheard of today.

“In 1883 James Longmire built a trail from Succotash Valley in Ashford 13 miles (21 km) to the hot springs where he built cabins in the area which now bears his name.  John Muir described staying there on the way to his ascent of Mount Rainier in 1888.

The oldest surviving structure in the National Park is a cabin built by Longmire’s son Elcaine Longmire at the springs in 1888. It is located north of the road in the area now called Longmire Meadows.

From 1899 to 1904 approximately 500 people a year visited Longmire Springs in the summer months. They reached the area by train to Ashford and then on Longmire’s wagon trail.

They enjoyed the mineral springs and the view of Mount Rainier. They could also hike to Paradise or Indian Henry’s Hunting Grounds, both about 6 miles from Longmire Springs on trails built by the Longmire family.” (Wikipeida.org)

Click on images to enlarge.

Redman Hall Indian

Redman Hall Head
Redman Hall Head, photo by Bob Walter.

The Redman Hall was once an important piece of the Eatonville community life. (It stood where the Landmark is now.) Over the years people met there forIORM meetings, auctions, dances, wrestling matches and more.

Now the indian head that adorned the building (yes, it was a different pre-PC era) is on display at the Van Eaton cabin. Bob Walter, president of the historical society, and who helped move it from Madora Dawkins home to the cabin, says, “It’s humongous, unique and it’s very heavy, so do not try to lift it up to get a better look at the back, because it will topple!”

It’s definitely worth checking out.

Photo courtesy of Bob Walter.

Click on images to enlarge.

Redman Hall (where Jebinos currently sits)
Redman Hall (where Landmark currently sits)

 

1924 – Elementary School Teacher Blanche

Blanche, Feb. 25, 1924
Blanche, Feb. 25, 1924

These photos come via Kay Christensen Davis and her cousin Neil Christensen. Kay’s great Aunt Blanche Christensen was a school teacher in Eatonville, and these pictures were taken in and around 1924.

“The pictures were from my Aunt Blanche that taught school at Eatonville in the early 1920’s. She was my grandmother Harriet Christensen’s sister. My cousin Neil Christensen sent the pictures to me. I don’t know who was in the pictures but I am assuming that they are kids that she taught,” says Kay.

Photos courtesy of Kay Christensen and Neil Christensen.

Click on images to enlarge.

1924 Eatonville Elementary Class
1924 Eatonville Elementary Class
Eatonville school children, early 1920s
Eatonville school children, early 1920s
Elementary school activities, ca. 1924
Elementary school activities, ca. 1924
EHS and Eatonville Elementary, 1924
EHS and Eatonville Elementary, 1924

 

Ashford Postcard, December 25, 1910

Ashford Postcard Dec. 25, 1910
Ashford Postcard Dec. 25, 1910

One hundred and six years ago, December 25, 1910, this postcard was mailed off from Ashford, Washington, to a friend in Orting.

What struck me was that there was someone at the Ashford postoffice on Christmas day. I did a little research and I believe that person was Mrs. Cora J. Ashford (Mrs. Walter A. Ashford).

The Ashford post office was established November 16, 1894, and Cora ran it for almost 40 years, until Louis Von Salzen took over December 13, 1933.

Here is what Guy Ramsey writes about the post office in Postmarked Washington: Pierce County.

“A combination store-hotel was built on the north side of State Highway 5, which passes through the village, and the post office was located there until transferred to Louis Von Salzen’s store on the opposite (southwest) corner of the intersecting street.

The first mail to Ashford’s place came over a trail through the forest by horseback from Meta. After the Elbe post office was opened, June 4, 1892, it was brought from that point either by horseback or stage.

The Tacoma and Eastern Railroad finished its line to Ashford in 1904 and thereafter Ashford’s mail was supplied by trains. Mr. Ashford would go to the depot with the pushcart to obtain it.”

Ashford Postcard Dec. 25, 1910 (back)
Ashford Postcard Dec. 25, 1910 (back)

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

Walter Ashford and Family
Walter Ashford and Family (Cora on the far left)

 

Glacier Basin Adventure in early 1900s and today

Great Basin Adventure - early 1990s and today
Glacier Basin Adventure – early 1990s and today

Here’s a little before and after combo. The top is the Glacier Basin Adventure in the very early 1900s, and below is the same view in 2016.

It’s hard to believe there was mining done at Mt. Rainier. “In 1948, 47 tons of ore was shipped off to Tacoma. In fact, it wasn’t until 1984 that the government purchased the last of the park’s inholdings. (The Big Fact Book of Mount Rainier)

Thank you Jeff Morrison for providing these.

Click on image to enlarge.

Glacier Basin, early 1900s vs. 2016

Glacier Basin early 1900s vs. 2016
Glacier Basin early 1900s vs. 2016

Thank you Jeff Morrison for showing us a glimpse of Glacier Basin then and now. The first shot was taken in the early 1900s, the lower one taken in 2016.

The Glacier Basin hike is a popular one at Mt. Rainier. The information below was taken from the website:

“Originally a mining road along the Inter Fork of the White River, the route was converted into a trail when the area became a national park. Visitors ranged from climbers accessing the popular Emmons Glacier, to families strolling out of White River campground. Located in close proximity to the dynamic, glacier-fed White River, the original trail was frequently damaged by the river’s shifting course. After the floods in 2006, the park elected to build a new trail that was no longer subject to the floods.”

Click on image to enlarge.