Featured Photo

Nellie Van Eaton in her Garden

IMG_0103T. C. Van Eaton may be known as Eatonville’s founder. But what about his wife? Because everyone knows that behind every man there’s a great woman.

Meet that great women, Nellie Van Eaton. She’s pictured here in her garden, where she obviously had a green thumb. Her grandson, Terry Van Eaton says that among other things, she ran the family restaurant during her younger years, in addition to raising a family.

She’s also pictured here in 1912 when T.C. ran for congress.

Here is information (that was posted below) by Margaret Nell Van Eaton. Thank you so much for sharing!

TC Van Eaton & Wife Nellie
TC Van Eaton & Wife Nellie

“Nellie Van Eaton was my grandmother. She grew up on a farm in Kansas. She graduated from Cedar Vale High School in 1903. I have her graduation diploma. She was married to T.C. Van Eaton in 1910, she was his third wife. His first wife died in an epidemic and his second wife died of breast cancer.

Nellie came to work for T.C. as a housekeeper after the death of his wife Mary Jane. Nellie had a young daughter who came with her from Kansas, Jennie Miller. Nellie had been married to a Mr. Miller, who went off to find work in the Oklahoma Territory and was never heard from again. She was was a very hard worker all her life. She ran a restaurant, sold insurance, always had a huge garden, had two boarders and cared for her sister until she passed in (1961?).

In the 1950s after T.C. died, she managed a herd of approximately 20 Hereford cattle, a milk cow, a large flock of chickens, ducks, an occasional pig and she helped take care of me while my parents were at work. I went to her house every day after school through the 4th grade.

She was also a very accomplished in the needle arts. She did beautiful tatting, crochet, knitting, sewing and quilt top making. I have a tablecloth she made that won a blue ribbon at the Western Washington State Fair in Puyallup.”

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

Murray Logging & Timber Co., in Mineral Wash.

Murray Logging & Timber Co.
Murray Logging & Timber Co.

You need to zoom in on this shot of Murray Logging & Timber Co., out of Mineral, Wash. Look at the men in the bottom lefthand corner to get feel for how BIG these logs really are.

I believe the pictures was taken in the 1920s, but if someone has more information on it, please let me know.

The Murray family still operates their tree farm (around 65,000 acres) outside town. There is also a Murray Logging Museum in Mineral, Wash. If you get a chance, check it out.

Photo courtesy of  Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on image to enlarge.

Nisqually Glacier 1912

Nisqually Glacier ca. 1912
Nisqually Glacier ca. 1912

That’s not a mountain of rock behind those individuals. It’s a mountain of ice —  the Nisqually Glacier in 1912.

“Paradise Glacier (little Nisqually Glacier) is one of the lower glaciers, starting at an elevation of only 9,000 feet. It is an interglacier, located between the Nisqually to the west and the Cowlitz to the northwest.

An 1896 map shows the Paradise Glacier about one-half mile from the Sluiskin Falls and an essy walk from Paradise. As the century progressed, the glacier retreated up the mountain, and separted into upper and lower sections. The once vast ice caves shrunk into unstable crawl spaces, and finally in 1991, the ceiling of the last cave collapsed.” (The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier)

Photo courtesy of Bill Smith.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Kendalls are Stuck in the Woods (ca. 1920)

Carrie Kendall, Glee Kendall, Ed Kendall and Clyde Kendall
Carrie Kendall, Glee Kendall, Ed Kendall and Clyde Kendall

After looking at this photo for a moment, you have more questions than answers.

First, how did they get the car out there? Where’s the road? The car seems to be emerging from solid brush.

Why would they be driving out in the woods?

Is that an animal the kid in the back is holding?

To find the answers, we’d have to ask (from left to right) Carrie Kendall, Glee Kendall, Ed Kendall and Clyde Kendall.

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

More Work on the Canyon Road (ca. 1919)

Moving the Canyon hillside rock by rock
Moving the Canyon hillside rock by rock

It’s hard to imagine the back breaking work that went into building the Canyon Road ‚ at times rock by rock.

There are a number of pictures of the crews toiling away (and blowing away) on the site and here are a few more.

Photos courtesy of the Haynes family.

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State-of-the-Art equipment of 1919
State-of-the-Art equipment of 1919
Sometimes you just had to take a hammer to those rocks
Sometimes you just had to take a hammer to those rocks

Red & White Store

Red and White Store
Red and White Store

The Red and White store used to be a familiar feature on Mashell Ave. For years you’d walk in and find Keith Malcom and Jesse Dawkins ready to serve you.

The building is no longer standing, and the spot it used to sit is currently the Kirk’s Pharmacy parking lot.

The memories live on though. Here are a few.

Barbara Baublits Schatz: Loved the meat market smell as you were walking up the ramp.

David Beane: I remember the tinkley little bell when entering from Mashall Ave. Because of the ramp, the store clerk could not always see if someone entered the store.

Frank Hurlburt: I remember going there to buy feed for the horses and chickens. Mom used to buy my Levi’s there too.

Image courtesy of Randy Stewart.

Click on image to enlarge.