To The Present

Canyada Lodge Ruins

Canadya Ruins - portion of the chimney 1989
Canadya Ruins - portion of the chimney 1989

In 1912, the Canyada Lodge was the something to behold. It was built in La Grande, by Pierce County Prosecuting Attorney, John L. McMurray, for $92,500 — something like $2.1 million today.

In 1927 the grand lodge burned and only the ruins remain. Here are two shots of the ruins taken in 1989, along with a postcard of the short lived Canyada.

Photos courtesy of Gary & Debbie Saint.

Click to enlarge photos.

 

 

 

 

 

Canyada-post-card
Canyada-post-card

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canadya Ruins - Stone columns (1989)
Canadya Ruins - Stone columns (1989)

Eatonville 1915 – 2011

Eatonville looking west, ca 1915
Eatonville looking west, ca 1915

In 1915 Eatonville was a hub of activity with an active mill and logs being transported through town by rail — among other things.

If you look in the back, at the top of the hill, you can see T.C. Van Eaton’s house.

The house still stands, but the town looks a little different.

 

Van Eaton House & Town, 2011
Van Eaton House & Town, 2011

Malcolms Make Their Mark

Ollie Malcom looks out from behind the counter at his meat market in this 1925 photo.
Ollie Malcom looks out from behind the counter at his meat market in this 1925 photo.

When Olaf Malcom arrived in 1918, he couldn’t have imagined the impact his family would have.

Olaf Malcom was a second-generation butcher from Norway. He homesteaded just outside Eatonville (where Rich Collins lives today) and built a slaughterhouse. The young entrepreneur opened up meat markets in Eatonville (currently the vacant building across from Tall Timber), Kapowsin, Mineral and Morton.

His entrepreneurial spirit was passed along to his children. His oldest son, Barney built a store and restaurant in 1946 on Meridian outside Eatonville. The building is no longer there, but you probably know it as “Barney’s Corner”.

Keith Malcolm, the next oldest son, started out as meat cutter like his dad. “I was raised around it. It’s what I knew.”

Eatonville Red & White Store around 1955
Eatonville Red & White Store around 1955

In 1946, after three and a half years in the Navy, Keith opened his own meat market in the Red and White store (today the parking lot next to Kirk’s Pharmacy). The Red and White was originally been T.C. Van Eaton’s store, with wood floors that had been cleaned with oil and sawdust.

Getting into Grocery
“My dad told me to just stick with meat cutting. Don’t get into grocery,” says Keith with a smile. He followed his father’s advice and just ran the meat cutting side alongside Jess Dawkins who ran the grocery in the Red and White. But a couple years later Keith bought Jess out.

In 1963, after 17 years in the Red and White, Keith and his wife Delores, made the jump and built the Shop Rite store (now the medical billing center). From 1963 to 1979 he managed the store, employed local folks, and had some interesting promotions, like “Guess the Pig’s Weight”.

ShopRite on Center
ShopRite on Center

“Rich Collins supplied the pig and fed it for me,” says Keith “And we had a pen in the store and for about 30 days we had people guessing its weight.”

Developing Eatonville
There was no stopping the Malcolm family when it came to starting businesses. “We built Malcom’s Deli Drive-in in the 1970s, [now Brunos] but we never developed the Drive-in,” says Delores with a laugh. She ran the deli for several years and says that was probably the hardest work she’s known — and she would know coming from a large logging family.

In the 70s they also built the Shell station (down near Arrow Lumber). In 1987 they built the Milltown Mall, then the Milltown Motel in 1992-93, which they ran for 6 or 7 years. Did I mention they also built the storage units, the mobile home park, and the office space across from Arrow?

“There was a need and we built it,” says Keith.

And to think it started with one meat cutter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Population of Eatonville 1920-1975

Mashell & Groe ca 1962
Mashell & Groe ca 1965

Eatonville’s current population is 2,563. That’s almost three times what it was just a few decades ago.

Year                 Population
1920                 931
1930                 912
1940                 996
1950                 1,048
1960                  896
1970                  852
1971                  860
1972                  860
1973                  860
1974                  902
1975                  912

 

 

 

Eatonville Auditorium — Then & Now (1915-2011)

Auditorium in 1915, equipped with fire proof motion picture booth
Auditorium in 1915, equipped with fire proof motion picture booth

The Eatonville High School has gone through a number of transformations over the last century. Here’s the 1915 state-of the-art auditorium (with a fire proof motion picture booth), next to the 2011 version.

Even with all the changes, you can still see some similarities.

Photos courtesy of Eatonville High School, Haynes family and Pat Van Eaton.

Click to enlarge photo.

 

 

 

Eatonville High School Auditorium 2011
Eatonville High School Auditorium 2011

Sasquatch Sightings

Diane Mettler's Bigfoot
Diane Mettler's Bigfoot

 

Mention Bigfoot and it’s just a matter of time before you hear about someone who claims to have seen the tall, hairy beast. Heck, I know several people — folks I consider sane and reasonable — who will swear they spotted him just miles from my house.

Eatonville Sasquatch Central
According to the Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization there are more Sasquatch sightings in Washington than any other state, and more sightings in Pierce County than any other county. So that would put Eatonville in Sasquatch Central.

Although we don’t talk much about our Sasquatch sightings, he’s definitely become part of our culture.

1971: Eatonville created a float for the Daffodil parade, complete with a Sasquatch. The float won a best humor award.

1972. A camera crew from Channel 5 came out and interviewed young men about a Sasquatch sighting.

1972. The Dispatch featured a cover story (extremely tongue and cheek) about Game Warden George Smallwood’s error in not following up the Sasquatch lead involving a calf killing.

Boys being interviewed - By Channel 5 (Dispatch Photo)
Boys being interviewed - By Channel 5 (Dispatch Photo)

 

1975. The bar on Mashell Ave. changed its name to Bigfoot Tavern.

1981: Four kids spotted Bigfoot near Alder Lake. A witness said, “We  . . . noticed rustling sounds in the bushes directly across the creek from us, maybe 40-50 feet away.  As we kept walking and trying to see what was making the sounds, we realized whatever it was, was keeping pace with us across the creek.

“Then we noticed a face peering through an opening in the bushes. It was mostly covered in reddish-brown shaggy hair. The eyes were a golden brown color. We kept walking another 100 yards or so, with the sasquatch peeking through the bushes maybe two more times. We ran back to camp, fast. We told our parents, who took us pretty seriously. I remember reading about other sightings in the area that same weekend when we got home from camping. (www.bfro.net)

May 10, 2010: Three hikers surprised a Bigfoot near the Eatonville cutoff road. One of the witnesses said, “I and my friends were hiking at the Eatonville waterfalls when we smelt a wet dog musky sweet smell. We figured it was elk or a bear. When we turned the corner by the middle fall there was a huge black creature crouching over like a human drinking from the river. My buddy gave a surprised yelp and it looked up stared at us for a minute then moved lightning quick into the trees. It didn’t seem scared but more annoyed. (www.bfro.net)

Eatonville Daffodil Float 1972 (Dispatch Photo)
Eatonville Daffodil Float 1971 (Dispatch Photo)

 

June 2011: There are plans to shoot a music video in near Eatonville. The subject? Bigfoot.

And the legend continues . . .

Click on Images to Enlarge.

 

Eatonville Gym — Then and Now

State of the art gym ca. 1915
State of the art gym ca. 1915

Eatonville High School has always had a great gym. Back in 1915 the Eatonville had a gym that was second to none.

You could find:
• An inside track around the balcony seats
• A boxing ring
• A swimming pool — 36′ by 18′
• All the latest equipment — rings, climbing ropes and more.

In the 2009, Eatonville remodeled the high school and the gym got another facelift.

Here are just a few “then” and “now” shots.

Click on images to enlarge.

Weight Room, 2011
Weight Room, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5th Grade Boys using the gym in ca. 1915
5th Grade Boys using the gym in ca. 1915

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gym, 2011
Gym, 2011

 

 

Fourth of July Then and Now

Eatonville July 4 looking South on Mashell Ave.
Eatonville July 4 looking South on Mashell Ave.

Eatonville has always been a fan of the 4th of July Parade. In fact, so many people take part in the parade, I’ve always been surprised there are still some left to watch.

Judging by these two photos, the cars may have changed, but not the enthusiasm.

Pictures courtesy of Pat Van Eaton and Diane Mettler.

Click photo to enlarge.

 

People lining Mashell, ready to watch the 2008 4th of July Parade
People lining Mashell, ready to watch the 2008 4th of July Parade

 

Mashell Avenue Through the Years

Mashell Ave ca 1913
Mashell Ave ca 1913

We’re lucky that so many people have taken pictures of Eatonville over the years — and saved them. Here’s a look at Mashell Avenue through the years and its transformation.

Photos Courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click to enlarge photos.

 

 

 

Mashell Ave ca 1946
Mashell Ave ca 1946

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mashell Ave ca 1955
Mashell Ave ca 1955

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mashell Ave ca 1972
Mashell Ave ca 1972

Eatonville Band – 1910 & 2008

Town band around 1910
Town band around 1910 - Photo courtesy Pat Van Eaton

The Eatonville band has  come a long way.

These two shots are of the band in about 1910. Going to the Western Washington Fair (which would have only been 10 years old at the time) was a big event.  It was a six days and parking was 25 cents. The biggest attraction back then was horse racing and the fair was built around a horse track.

Back in 1910, fair  was known as The Valley Fair, and it was renamed in 1913.

Eatonville School band at valley fair
Eatonville School band at Valley Fair ca. 1910 - photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton

In the second picture, two of the smaller band members got to ride the bull — definitely something a school would frown on today.

The last picture is of the Eatonville high school band playing in the town’s July 4th parade in 2008 — 98 years later. The clothes are a little different, but the instruments look the same!

Eatonville high school band, July 4, 2008
Eatonville high school band, July 4, 2008

Click on any image to enlarge.