1909

Eatonville’s Town Marshals (1909-1969)

Sheriff Jim Smith's patrol car with two-way radio (ca. 1951)
Sheriff Jim Smith's patrol car with two-way radio (ca. 1951)

With all the news about Eatonville’s police department lately, I thought it might be a good time to look back at the town’s law enforcement.

Moving through Marshals
Eatonville has had its ups and down with law enforcement since 1907, when the first town marshall was appointed — L. E. Martin. Martin’s job wasn’t glamorous. “He was not only the marshall but was instructed by the clerk or the mayor to do such things as ‘remove a bench from in front of  the liquor store, as it was a nuisance,’ and to ‘push over the out house at the Columbia Cafe, and fill in the excavation’ on a certain date if the owner didn’t make improvements.”

Marshals came and went. In the early years, they didn’t seem to stay more than a year.

“On September 7, 1925, Dollar LaPlante was marshal. He was sent to check on a shooting spree by a drunk. He came unarmed, the man pulled a gun and LaPlante was killed. The man was convicted and sent to prison.”

“In October 1939, the marshal asked that a lavatory be built in the town hall so it wouldn’t be necessary to take the prisoners out and also that a steel door be built on the jail.” Back then officers were also trying to get money for car expenses because they were using their own vehicles. They were denied.

“In 1947, a suit for false arrest was brought against the marshal. Citizens urged his dismissal. As a result the mayor resigned. The new mayor appointed a new marshal. In 1948, the marshal’s salary was set at $265 a month, and his was granted a car allowance of $40. He got of $15 raise in 1950.”

In November, 1951 a group of “interested citizens” met at the Dispatch office with the Pierce County Sheriff because they wanted a deputy sheriff and radio patrol car to be permanently located in southeastern Pierce County. There had been a number of instances of cattle rustling and other crimes in the area. After some months Deputy Sheriff Jim Simth was assigned to the new position created by the Board of County Commissioners. The town patrol car was equipped iwth a two-way radio as was the deputy’s car, for copperation of the two agencies.”

In 1967 Tony DelVicchio took the job until April 1970 when he died and Dick Carney too over as acting town marshal. By 1969 people wanted a second police officer, but he council decided it wasn’t feasible at that time.

Information taken from Timber Town and Later.

Images courtesy of the Smith family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Martin Carlson and family (1909)

Martin Carlson Family - 1909
Martin Carlson Family – 1909

This early photograph shows Martin Carlson at his Mount Vernon farm a couple years before he moved to Alder.

Carl Linden says, “Left to right — Martin’s wife, Elsa, holding Margaret, Helen, Ruth, Einar, David and the man is unknown to me, probably a hired hand for the haying. Three more girls were born after that…in Eatonville: Elsie (1911), Esther  (1914) and Alice (1917).

Photo courtesy of Carl Linden.

Click on image to enlarge.

Alder School 1909 and 2012

Alder Community Center, previously the Alder School
Alder Community Center, previously the Alder School

This is the old Alder School — or at least the bottom floor. It is presently the Alder Community Club.

Pat Van Eaton says that the school was moved to its present location when the Alder Dam was built. The Alder School District consolidated with the Eatonville School District around 1948 and it was then that the Alder Community Club took it over and removed the top story.

The second picture show the school in all it’s glory in 1909, when it was a full two stories.

Photos courtesy of Carl Linden and Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

2nd Alder school ca 1909
2nd Alder school ca 1909

Eatonville Lumber Company 1908

Eatonville Lumber Company 1908
Eatonville Lumber Company 1908

What’s interesting about this 1908 shot of the Eatonville Lumber Company is the burner. Most times the shots are of a domed burner (aka wigwam burner), which was built  in 1932 after the 1st mill burned down.

The mill is brand new in the picture, built in 1907. No sooner was it up and running, there were financial difficulties and new management was needed. The Bank of California hired T. S. Galbraith to operate the mill. He came to Eatonville in the fall of 1909 and his family moved up the following year.

Galbraith would go on to play a major roll in the town for years to follow.

Photo courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Elbe, 1909

Early Elbe school
Early Elbe school

The Pierce County Auditor wrote this about the town of Elbe in 1909:

Situated in the Nisqually River Valley in the heart of the timber district is the town of Elbe.

On October 20, 1903, Adam Sachs and wife filed a plt of the town, and the following year the Tacoma Eastern Raileway built its line through the town.

Elbe has three general stores, two hotels, five business houses, livery stable and several large logging camps, a fine school and a hustling population of 350. It is near the great coal belt and borders on the finest timber in the state.

Early Elbe, Lutkens hotel on the right
Early Elbe, Lutkens hotel on the right

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton. Auditor info from Linda Lewis.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

Elbe Bridge
Elbe Bridge

 

Band on the Back of a Bull – 1909

Kids on the back of the bull named General Funston
Kids on the back of the bull named General Funston

This article article ran in the 50th Anniversary edition of the Dispatch. And you gotta love the name of the bull — General Funston.

The article reads:

Young people of pioneer families in Eatonville around 1909 knew nothing of radios, television, movies, dashing into Tacoma, etc., but they were grand old times, according to those we have talked with recently, and they had lots of fun.

A happy memory was the band that made history by going to the Puyallup Fair, accompanied by a 2,300-pound bull, General Funston, that stories tell was gentle as a lamb. T.C. Van Eaton donated the uniforms and the bull was owned by A. E. Dye.

General Funston walked the nearly 30 miles to Puyallup to haul a float, which was probably Eatonville’s first appearance in an out-of-town parade, and the young players joined him, riding to town on the Tacoma & Eastern.

The band and General Funston were photographed on Mashell Avenue about where the Richfield Station stands today. Sitting on the General were (left to right): William Canty, Rudolph Wilson, McKinley Van Eaton, Harry Smith, Happy Wilson and Chet McAllister. The drummer was Sam Hawdenshield and with him were Clare McAllister, Frank Van Eaton, Ad Samuels and John Nagley.

Article courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge. 

Anna Peterson Postcards

Peterson Postcard of Mineral Lake, 1909
Peterson Postcard of Mineral Lake, 1909

Anna Peterson kept up communications in 1908 and 1908 via postcards. These were postmarked from Tacoma and Ashford.

Living next door to what was once her home, I feel a little kinship when I mail off my postcards at the Eatonville post office.

Images courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Peterson Postcard - Mineral Lake - 1909 - Side 2
Peterson Postcard - Mineral Lake - 1909 - Side 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peterson Postcard from Myrtle DeWitt, 1909 - Ashford
Peterson Postcard from Myrtle DeWitt, 1909 - Ashford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peterson Postcard from Myrtle DeWitt, 1909 - Ashford (Side 2)
Peterson Postcard from Myrtle DeWitt, 1909 - Ashford (Side 2)

Building Road to Silver Lake, 1908

Early Eatonville Road Crew taking a break
Early Eatonville Road Crew taking a break

Today when you needed a road repaired, you get in touch with the county or the state highway department. In 1908, if you needed road work you called on your neighbors.

This local group of buys were taking time out for lunch while building the road to Silver Lake were:

Lower row, left to right: Clyde Wallace, George H. Nelson Sr., Clifford Manning, Henry Wesserling, Mr. Finnegan, Frank McTee, Charlie Asmussen.

Middle row, left to right: Chris Nelson, Roscoe King, Alfred Ohneck, Bob Fiander, Milton Smith, Dad Heaton, Charlie McTee.

Top row, left to right: Oscar Faulk, Andrew Anderson, Nels Asplund, Fred Guske Sr., Ace Mattox, Ed Reiter, Ryder, Charlie Kreger, Axel Berg and Louis Wesserling.

Alder Schools

Alder School ca. 1905
Alder School ca. 1905 (Courtesy Pat Van Eaton)

Alder was a bigger town in the early 1900s.

The first photo is of the Alder School #2, built in 1905 on a knoll on the north edge of town. It burned down two years later.

The new Alder school was built in 1909.

Rod Scurlock reminisces about his days a school kid there in his book Old Alder.

Discipline in schools was different hen. The south bench kids were walking down the south side of the highway after school on afternoon, and the north side kids on the north side of the highway. Words occurred, and soon became rocks. One of the north side kids threw a rock that hit a south side girl in the forehead.

At just that moment, the principal came by in his Model T and saw the fight. The next afternoon when school was out, several of us were detained and the principal took down a slot made form the back fo a rocker and employed it where it would do the most good. There was no more rock fights after that.”

Alder School built in 1909
Alder School built in 1909 (Photo courtesy Pat Van Eaton)

 

Going to School in Alder
Rod says there were eight grades in the school — grades one through four in one room and five through eight in the other — with one teacher per room. You even though many students got their exercise walking to school (some coming several miles) it didn’t stop them from enjoying recess.

“Everyone participated in the games, boys and girls together. Favorite sports were baseball, basketball, pom pom polaway, hockey (with vine maple clubs and tin cans), and less vigorous sports for the little ones. Torn shirts for pom pom polaway, and bruised heads, arms, and legs from the hockey were the oder of the day,” says Rod.