1910

Western Washington Fair 1910 and the Eatonville Band

Eatonville Band at the Washington State Fair 1910The Washington State Fair is in full swing right now and Eatonville has been involved in it for over a century. This is a picture of school band ready to play at was then called the “Valley Fair” along with a friendly bull, which pulled the wagon that carried the band. (Obviously, band wasn’t popular with the girls back then.)

For more pictures of the event, click HERE.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

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Van Eaton’s General Store (ca. 1910)

T. C. Van Eaton's building, standing where Kirk's parking lot is today.
T. C. Van Eaton’s building, standing where Kirk’s parking lot sits today.

T.C. Van Eaton built the first general store — where Kirk’s Pharmacy stands today — and in 1912 sold it to A. Y. Lindsey Co. 

This appears to be the back half of the store, and T.C. Van Eaton in the center, wearing the dark suit and hat.

A.Y. Lindsey Co., Marshell Ave. (early 1900s)
A.Y. Lindsey Co., Marshell Ave. (early 1900s)

Per Pat Van Eaton, the boy in the chair is John Van Eaton. The man in the doorway is Charlie Williams and his nephew. The pictures was taken around 1914, making John Van Eaton (born 1911) about 3 years old.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

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Eatonville Lumber Company facts

Eatonvlle Lbr Co yarder
Eatonvlle Lbr Co yarder

Here are a few things you might know about the Eatonville Lumber Company, which operated in Eatonville from 1907 until 1954.

• Tacoma Eastern/Chicago Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad arrived in 1904 — followed by the opening of the mill in 1907.
T. S. Galbraith (Tom) took over ELCO in the fall of 1909.
John Galbraith (Tom’s son) took over from his dad in 1930. He was also mayor of Eatonville for 22 years and chairman of the school board for numerous terms.
• The mill employed 200 employees at its height.
• Wages in 1912 – $.17/hr., and an employee worked six, eight-hour days a week.
• Wages in 1952 – $1.85/hr., and employees worked five, eight-hour days a week.
ELCO store was built in 1908
• ELCO office was built in 1910
• ELCO station and auto repair shop was built in 1907
T. S. Galbraith built his home in 1925 and it’s still used today.

Overview of ELCO 1942
Overview of ELCO 1942

• T. S. Galbraith built 22 company-owned homes. Most were built in 1910 and were located next to the company store, and some are still family homes.
• The houses on Prospect Street were built in 1913 and the houses on Washington street were built in 1923.
• The mill burned in 1932 and was rebuilt over a number of years. It finally reopened September 22, 1936.
• Galbraith sold the mill to G. E. Karlen in 1941.

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton, the Parnel family and the University of Washington. Facts courtesy of The Eatonville History Project.

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Morgan and Ray Williams (ca. 1910)

Morgan Williams & Ray Williams
Morgan Williams & Ray Williams

These two little kids are Morgan and Ray Williams.

Ray was the son of Charley Williams, who owned the Pioneer Garage — known today at the Tall Timber Restaurant. Ray graduated from Eatonville High School in 1923 and was quite the athlete. He was on the incredible basketball team that went to Chicago and was also a state champion in track, competing in the 880, broad jump and high jump.

Photo and information courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

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Ray Williams, Basket ball player 1923
Ray Williams, Basket ball player 1923

Langberg Farm Meeting (1910)

Langberg Farmhouse 1910 - Farmer's Meeting
Langberg Farmhouse 1910 - Farmer's Meeting

There isn’t a lot of information on this photo, except that is was taken in front of the Langberg farmhouse in 1910 and is the farmer’s meeting. I think it’s interesting that they brought a gramophone to the meeting. That particular gramophone design was fairly new in 1910. It was probably like bringing your new iPad to a meeting.

If you know more about this picture, please let us know.

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

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Those Beautiful Ohop Valley Women (ca. 1915)

Hilda & Ester Faulk, Ella Ericksen, Anna Peterson, Amelia Harstad, Mary Jacobson, Ida Anderson
Hilda & Ester Faulk, Ella Ericksen, Anna Peterson, Amelia Harstad, Mary Jacobson, Ida Anderson

I love this shot taken in the early 20th century. Pictured here are Hilda and Ester Faulk, Ella Ericksen, Anna Peterson (flat hat), Amelia Harstad, Mary Jacobson, Ida Anderson. They women and dressed up and ready for some occasion, although no one looks especially happy about it.

The hats back then were amazing. I’m sure they were a pain to wear, take care of, clean and store, but they were cool. Fashion Era says:

Lingerie hats made from muslin or froths of lace appeared about 1904 and were ideal for those able to idle away time in a perpetual summer whether abroad or at home.  They were perfect with lingerie dresses in fine white lawns and linens in white, ivory, cream or ecru.  

1915 fashions
1915 fashions

In Edwardian era. wearing white was a symbol of wealth, as whites needed laundering and laundry needed the efforts of maids who spent hours scrubbing out grass stains on soiled hems wear ladies had strolled lawns.  Lingerie dresses were in effect status symbols that made a statement. It visually told the onlooker that the wearer could afford to pay someone to launder their clothes.

However for more modest day wear and often in winter, the toque was a favorite choice for many women.  It was more and more acceptable to participate in sports, particularly bicycle riding. For these activities panamas, boaters, felt homburgs and sectioned pancake berets resting on a flat brim were all used for golf, motor cars and cycling.

Wider period hats in general became fashionable and were bedecked with an abundance of large cabbage rose, poppies or gerberas all overwhelming the crowns.   Every type of trim possible was used throughout the Edwardian era, from lace, to whole birds to bunches of cherries, blackberries to rosettes and ribbon streamers.

 

Photo courtesy of Linda Lewis.

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Marie Lutkens Postcard (1910)

Postcard to Marie Lutkens from her sister Minnie 1910
Postcard to Marie Lutkens from her sister Minnie 1910

Marie Lutkens Drussel, the daughter of Henry Lutkens, was one of the pioneering families of Elbe. Here’s a postcard sent to her from her sister Minnie.

The postcard is dated 1910, and was probably stamped by the Alder postmaster at the time Martin Hotes. The post office was seven miles outside Eatonville on the north shore of Alder lake. The Hotes family ran the office from the time it was established in 1902 through 1921.

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

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Marie Luktens postcard 1910 pg 2
Marie Luktens postcard 1910 pg 2