1914

Charley Boettcher’s Pond

Charley Boettcher's Pond
Charley Boettcher’s Pond

Charley Boettcher’s pond was a fun swimming hole, but was originally mill pond. They got a permit to build it. It had a concrete spill way and an earth dam.

Chas. Boettcher, Glen Parks and Frank Shepherd formed the Nisqually Single Mill Co. and built a two-machine shingle mill in 1914 at the mouth of Alder Creek. This is where the first dam was built by the City of Tacoma across the Nisqually River and it formed a small lake. They used this for a mill pond. They also engaged in logging on a small scale, using the lake to float their logs to the railroad. They ceased operations in 1920.” (Per History of Southeastern Pierce County)

Pat Van Eaton says that after the mill was closed in the 1920s, Charley planted trees, added some fish and installed diving boards.

The next shot is of Charley sitting at his pond in later in his life.

Charley's pond — Charley on left in later years
Charley’s pond — Charley on left in later years

Images courtesy of Pat Van Eaton and the Boettcher family.

Click on images to enlarge.

Eatonville Post Office (1914 – 1918)

US Post Office during WWI,
US Post Office during WWI,

The information with this photo states that it was taken during WWI (1914-1918) when Jackson was postmaster and Fred Matheny delivered mail.

Since Charles O. Jackson was postmaster between 1914 and 1923, and Matheney delivered mail for decades.

For stories about Matheny’s delivery days, click HERE.

Photo courtesy of Rick Parnell and the Parnell family.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

 

 

Early Hardware store

Old Eatonville hardware store
Old Eatonville hardware store

Here’s a glimpse inside the early Eatonville hardware store. The information on the photo says that the stairs in the back lead to an apartment above.

This is probably Mr. Ingersoll’s hardware store around 1914 (see Pat’s comments below). In the 1915 fire, it would not only burn to the ground, it would be the place the got its start.

Photo courtesy of Rick Parnell and the Parnell family.

Click on the image to enlarge.

Early Ambulances (and the Rising Corpse)

First Ambulance
First Ambulance

When Dr. A. W. Bridge had a patient in his 1914 Model T ambulance, he found it difficult to check on the patient’s condition unless he stopped the ambulance first. The patient’s cot was behind him and he couldn’t twist around and observe the patient and drive at the same time.

Custom Changes
Dr. Bridge came up with an idea. He would cut away the passenger’s half of the front seat and lengthen the steering shaft. The combination would put the patient’s head beside him and he could simply glance down from time to time to see how the patient was getting along. The idea worked, but the long steering shaft made the vehicle difficult to handle.

Dr. Bridge asked Dr. Claude E. Wiseman to take the ambulance calls, but after a trip in the altered ambulance Dr. Wiseman told Dr. Bridge, “It’s your invention. You drive it.” So, Dr. Bridge hired a young Clyde Williams as driver and Clyde drove the altered vehicle from 1914 to 1915.

Lumbermans Hospital - Mashell Ave.
Lumbermans Hospital – Mashell Ave.

New Ambulance
In 1915, Mr. Bridge replaced the Model T and Mr. Williams remembered the new Model T well. It had 40 horsepower and was so light that when a tire had to be changed, a couple of men could lift the vehicle onto blocks.

The vehicle’s body overhung the rear wheels to an extent that a heavy weight on the back caused the front wheels rise off the ground.

Like all Model T’s though, it had lots of ground clearance, which was important. Mr. Williams — sometimes accompanied by Dr. Bridge and sometimes alone — often drove where there were no roads or only a trail to reach remote houses.

The Corpse
Mr. Williams chiefly remembered the vehicle for the hair-raising experience when a deceased patient was loaded into the ambulance. Mr. Williams was half way to Eatonville when the dead man slowly rose to a sitting position. Rigor mortis had set in and the contracting muscles caused him to sit up.

“When I saw him start to sit up, I nearly went through the roof,” recalled Mr. Williams.

Eatonville Moves from Horses to Cars 1914 (Mashell Ave.)

Mashell Ave. (1914)
Mashell Ave. (1914)

The move from horses to cars didn’t happen overnight. You can see from this picture of Mashell Avenue during the winter of 1914.

Per Pat Van Eaton, this pictures shows a big time of change for Eatonville.   T.C. Van Eaton had just sold his store to Christensen. Electric power had reached Mashell Ave.. The two men at the far right are standing where the top rail of the hitching post used to be, and you can still make out the uprights. On the utility pole hangs a sign that reads “Gas for Sale” and there is a hand pump and hose at the base of the pole.

And there is change soon to come. In May 1915 the hardware store will burn down, soon a modern high school will be built at the end of the street and within four years the horse and buggy ear will be gone.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

McKinley (Mack) Van Eaton’s Report Card (1913-14)

Mack Van Eaton's report card (1913-1914)
Mack Van Eaton’s report card (1913-1914)

McKinley (Mack) Van Eaton did well in Eatonville High School during the 1913 – 1914 school year. Subjects included English II, Latin II, Geometry II, Marv. Training, art, and penmanship.

This should be a lesson to all students to do well in school. You never know when your report card might be passed around for people to see — even 99 years later.

Image courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Petersons and their 1914 Cadillac

Peterson’s and their 1914 Cadillac
Peterson’s and their 1914 Cadillac

The caption on this photo read: Anna Peterson and Ted Peterson in their 1914 Cadillac. It’s good to see that there was a good sense of humor back then. If you’re curious what a 1914 Cadillac touring car really looked like back then, here’s a shot.

Photo courtesy of Linda Lewis. And THANK YOU to Joe Rudick for repairing the photo!

Click on image to enlarge.

1914 Touring Cadillac
1914 Touring Cadillac

 

First Debate Team at EHS (1913-1914)

1913 School Catalog - Debate Team
1913 School Catalog - Debate Team

This was taken from the Eatonville 1913/1914 school catalog. It appears that we stomped Roy High School when it came to debating issues.

The Eatonville-Roy Debate looked at topics like, “The annexation of Canada to the U.S. would be for the best interests of both countries.” Would love to hear the same debate today.

The champion debaters were: Hans Christensen, Hugo Johnson, Carrie Nagley and Helen Engle.

Courtesy of Ruth Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

J. C. Pratt’s Report Card (1915)

J. C. Pratt's 3rd grade report card
J. C. Pratt's 3rd grade report card

J. C. Pratt, who was one of Eatonville’s early town councilmen, could never imagined that his child, Francis Pratt’s 3rd grade report card would become a piece of the town’s history.

Luckily, Francis moved on to fourth grade with great marks according to teacher N. C. (Clare) Stevenson, and Principal B. W. Lyon.

Elementary school report cards haven’t changed too much.

E = Excellent (90 to 100)
G = Good (80 to 90)
F = Fair (70 to 80)
P = Poor (60 to70)
VP = Very Poort (50 to 60)

Images courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

Francis Pratt's 3rd grade report card
Francis Pratt's 3rd grade report card