1915

Early Ambulances (and the Rising Corpse)

First Ambulance
First Ambulance

When Dr. A. W. Bridge had a patient in his 1914 Model T ambulance, he found it difficult to check on the patient’s condition unless he stopped the ambulance first. The patient’s cot was behind him and he couldn’t twist around and observe the patient and drive at the same time.

Custom Changes
Dr. Bridge came up with an idea. He would cut away the passenger’s half of the front seat and lengthen the steering shaft. The combination would put the patient’s head beside him and he could simply glance down from time to time to see how the patient was getting along. The idea worked, but the long steering shaft made the vehicle difficult to handle.

Dr. Bridge asked Dr. Claude E. Wiseman to take the ambulance calls, but after a trip in the altered ambulance Dr. Wiseman told Dr. Bridge, “It’s your invention. You drive it.” So, Dr. Bridge hired a young Clyde Williams as driver and Clyde drove the altered vehicle from 1914 to 1915.

Lumbermans Hospital - Mashell Ave.
Lumbermans Hospital – Mashell Ave.

New Ambulance
In 1915, Mr. Bridge replaced the Model T and Mr. Williams remembered the new Model T well. It had 40 horsepower and was so light that when a tire had to be changed, a couple of men could lift the vehicle onto blocks.

The vehicle’s body overhung the rear wheels to an extent that a heavy weight on the back caused the front wheels rise off the ground.

Like all Model T’s though, it had lots of ground clearance, which was important. Mr. Williams — sometimes accompanied by Dr. Bridge and sometimes alone — often drove where there were no roads or only a trail to reach remote houses.

The Corpse
Mr. Williams chiefly remembered the vehicle for the hair-raising experience when a deceased patient was loaded into the ambulance. Mr. Williams was half way to Eatonville when the dead man slowly rose to a sitting position. Rigor mortis had set in and the contracting muscles caused him to sit up.

“When I saw him start to sit up, I nearly went through the roof,” recalled Mr. Williams.

Eatonville Barber Shop (ca. 1915)

Eatonville Barber
Eatonville Barber

Eatonville was home to an upscale barber shop around 1915. (Randy Stewart believes the barber’s name was Hendricksen.)

The local barber not only had all the latest equipment, tonics and comfortable chairs, there are also fans, floral decor . . . and taxidermy. In the corner is seat to have your shoes shined, including a spittoon.

Pat Van Eaton says, “The barber shop was located between Ingersol Hardware and the New Mashell Restaurant where the Sears store is now. It burned down in 1915 fire.”

We do know but looking at the walls he ran a union shop and accepted “positively no credit”.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Thank you! Over 58,600 views in 2012

Snow storm 1915-16, Mashell Bridge and Eatonville Lumber Co.
Snow storm 1915-16, Mashell Bridge and Eatonville Lumber Co.

THANK YOU to everyone who has visited this site and made it a success. In 2012 there were 58,623 visits — roughly 19 times the population of Eatonville.

Your input is making this a valuable addition to Eatonville’s history.

Hopefully 2013 will be one historians will look back on kindly.

Happy New Year!!

Diane

Photo courtesy of the Christensen family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville to Tacoma Stage (ca. 1915)

Eatonville to Tacoma Stage ca 1915
Eatonville to Tacoma Stage ca 1915, Frank Van Eaton driving

It’s hard to believe that the Eatonville to Tacoma Stage was a step up from the horse.

This vehicle looks like it was built around 1915. Judging by the dirt road, the tractor-like shocks, and the not-too-snug cover, not to mention that these cars traveled at about 30 mph, it had to be one long, drafty and bumpy ride.

On a completely different note, is that a baseball mitt on one of the boy’s hands?

Photo courtesy of Jackie (Van Eaton) Parnell.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Mashell Ave ca. 1915

Mashell Ave ca 1915
Mashell Ave ca 1915

Lucky for us, people just couldn’t stop taking pictures of Mashell Ave. throughout the years.  This one was taken around 1915. The cards were simple, the sidewalks were wood and the road was still dirt.

To get some perspective, you would be standing in the intersection of Center and Mashell, looking up toward the high school. On the right, up the street, you can make out the Methodist Church.

If you’ve got a great old shot of Mashell, let me know — even if it’s from 1975. I’d love to post it.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Sachs Hill in Elbe (ca. 1915)

Mr. and Mrs. Sachs
Mr. and Mrs. Sachs on Sax Hill

It’s the first of May, the flowers are out of the ground and this picture of Sachs Hill in Elbe seems wildly appropriate.

The picture reads “Lloyd and Serena B. Sachs”, but I notice there is a second man in the flower bed. Lloyd is her son, and probably the young man by the car. If her husband, Adam, was anything like my husband, who can sometimes be talked into helping in the flower beds, maybe that’s him.

Earlier in life Serena (Marshall) Sachs taught school in the Seattle area. During summer vacations she would teach in school districts out in the rural areas. One of those schools was Pleasant Valley. She took a homestead there along with her brother Charles Edward Marshall — also a teacher.

It was Serena who talked Adam Sachs into coming out to the area. He came out, married Miss Marshall and become the owner of Elbe Cash store. (info per History of Southeastern Pierce County.)

Photo courtesy of the Historical Society and Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

 

G. B. Ingersoll Keeps Eatonville in Hardware (1911)

G. B. Ingersoll Ad (1911)
G. B. Ingersoll Ad (1911)

G. B. Ingersoll was the Arrow Lumber of his day. In this 1911 ad that ran in the Eatonville High School Catalogue, he covers it call hardward, furniture, stoves, ranges and building materials.

He was involved in town business — attended the county convention, held office of Town Treasurer and more.

Unfortunately, Ingersoll experienced a major set back a few years later. In 1915, someone inadvertently set his store on fire, setting off what is considered Eatonville’s worst fire.

Eatonville Blaze of 1915
Eatonville Blaze of 1915

Image courtesy of Rich Williams and Gary Henrickson.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Methodist Church Gets Face Life in 1915

Methodist Church ca. 1915
Methodist Church ca. 1915

You know the Methodist Church is one of the older buildings in Eatonville when it was getting a remodeled in 1915. Here are a few pictures of the church around that era.

The first image is a postcard from around 1915 — I assume before the remodel.  The second shot is taken in the early 1920s when the church built an addition. It looks like a brand new church.

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

Methodist Church (ca. 1915) Side 2
Methodist Church (ca. 1915) Side 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Methodist Church (ca. 1921)
Methodist Church (ca. 1921)