1920

Kendalls are Stuck in the Woods (ca. 1920)

Carrie Kendall, Glee Kendall, Ed Kendall and Clyde Kendall
Carrie Kendall, Glee Kendall, Ed Kendall and Clyde Kendall

After looking at this photo for a moment, you have more questions than answers.

First, how did they get the car out there? Where’s the road? The car seems to be emerging from solid brush.

Why would they be driving out in the woods?

Is that an animal the kid in the back is holding?

To find the answers, we’d have to ask (from left to right) Carrie Kendall, Glee Kendall, Ed Kendall and Clyde Kendall.

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

Ohop Valley, Then and Then

Ohop Valley, between 1907 & 1920
Ohop Valley, between 1907 & 1920

Got these two RPPCs (real photo post cards) off Ebay of Ohop Valley. They show the early farms and their development. The first one was taken been 1907-1920, then second was a little later (ca. 1930s). The trees have grown in some, and another barn went up.

The RPPCs are a great piece of history — people capturing the pieces of history with their Kodak cameras. On the backs of the cards you came sometimes tell the date based on the printing. Here’s a resource if you’re curious about any of your RPPC dates. Real Photo Guide.

Photos courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Ohop Valley, ca. 1930
Ohop Valley, ca. 1930

Click on images to enlarge.

A Drive to Rainier (1920s)

trip to the mountain (ca. 1920)
trip to the mountain (ca. 1920)

The roads in Eatonville this weekend were packed with people taking a drive up to Mount Rainier, a popular past time for over a century.

Here are a couple shots of folks taking the trip around 1920. Looks like the view at Paradise hasn’t changed a whole lot.

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

Paradise (ca. 1920)
Paradise (ca. 1920)

Building the Canyon Road (ca. 1919)

Building on the Canyon Rd.
Building on the Canyon Rd.

The Canyon Road was quite an undertaking in 1919. Built on a cliff side, roads had to often be blasted out of rock. Today the road is being repair, but they should feel lucky it’s a repair and not the back breaking work on building.

For more pictures of the building, click HERE.

Photos courtesy of the Haynes family.

Click on images to enlarge.

Car on the early Canyon Rd. (ca. 1920)
Car on the early Canyon Rd. (ca. 1920)

 

Charley Boettcher’s Pond

Charley Boettcher's Pond
Charley Boettcher’s Pond

Charley Boettcher’s pond was a fun swimming hole, but was originally mill pond. They got a permit to build it. It had a concrete spill way and an earth dam.

Chas. Boettcher, Glen Parks and Frank Shepherd formed the Nisqually Single Mill Co. and built a two-machine shingle mill in 1914 at the mouth of Alder Creek. This is where the first dam was built by the City of Tacoma across the Nisqually River and it formed a small lake. They used this for a mill pond. They also engaged in logging on a small scale, using the lake to float their logs to the railroad. They ceased operations in 1920.” (Per History of Southeastern Pierce County)

Pat Van Eaton says that after the mill was closed in the 1920s, Charley planted trees, added some fish and installed diving boards.

The next shot is of Charley sitting at his pond in later in his life.

Charley's pond — Charley on left in later years
Charley’s pond — Charley on left in later years

Images courtesy of Pat Van Eaton and the Boettcher family.

Click on images to enlarge.

Eatonville Lumber Co. Locomotive

Eatonville Lumber Co. Locomotive
Eatonville Lumber Co. Locomotive

The Eatonville Lumber Company was in operation until the 1950s and a major employer of the town.  Here is one of the company’s locomotives taking trees from the nearby forests.

Pat Van Eaton says (below), “The Class C 70-3 Shay locomotive #3053 was built in Lima, Ohio, February 20, 1920 for the Eatonville Lumber Company.

It carried 3,000 gallons of water and a road weight of 79 tons with fuel and other added equipment.

According to the factory records, it burned coal, but that may not ben the case as the cinders would have caused forest fires. Mostly likely it burned oil because the stack has no screen.

It was leased to Tacoma Rail on January 5, 1944 and was sold to Sauk River Lumber Co., Darrington, Wash., February 27, 1948, who scrapped it in the early 1950s. The Lima Locomotive Works built 582 Class C Shays before they ceased building them in 1945. They built 2,767 Shay Locomotives of all sizes.”

Photo courtesy fo the Kjelstad family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Canyada Lodge Ad (ca. 1920)

Canyada Lodge Ad (pg. 1)
Canyada Lodge Ad (pg. 1)

The Canyada Lodge in La Grande offered a top notch getaway for those headed up to the Rainier National Park in the early 1900s.

This advertisement is geared to get your mouth watering: “We boast of our home cooking. All meals are served family style. Our fried “Chicken Dinners,” with hot biscuits and country gravy, too well known to speak of, are a thing of pride with us. To come once is to come again and bring your friends.”

The Eatonville phone number was easy to remember – 512.

Canyada Lodge Ad (pg. 2)
Canyada Lodge Ad (pg. 2)

Images courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

Early Dispatch (ca. 1920)

Eatonville's early printing press
Eatonville’s early printing press

The Eatonville Dispatch got its start in 1916. The press was possibly a 1908 Chandler & Price Gordon press.

Hard Work
There’s a video on YouTube that shows hand typesetting and printing in 1947. Within minutes you understand what work went into putting out a paper — long before the computer or printer.

1908 Printing Pree Ad
1908 Printing Pree Ad

When you see all the steps — espeically typesetting — that went into printing a paper, it’s amazing that there was time to write, layout, print and deliver the paper in a week.

Photo courtesy of Rick Parnell and the Parnell family.

Click on image to enlarge.