1920s

Kids on School Bus No. 4 (1920s)

Eatvonille School bus (1920s)
Eatvonille School bus (1920s)

Before there were big yellow school buses, Eatonville transported kids in busses like these. They look a little like trolley car glued to the front end of a truck, but the kids seem to like it.

The only thing missing is a school bus driver. Maybe he’s taking the picture.

Photo courtesy of Terry and Sharon Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Feeding the Fire Crew (early 1920s)

Nate Williams and crew providing food for the fire fighters at Bird Creek
Nate Williams and men feeding the fire fighters at Bird Creek - Nate (far right) and grandson Cecil (far left)

Martha Parrish (who just turned 99 this year) said that forest fires up in the hills around Eatonville were a common thing when she was young. You’d often see the smoke rising up out of the woods in the summer.

You don’t hear much about early fire fighters though. Here’s a picture of Nate Williams (far right) and the crew, with is grandson Cecil on the far left. The note on the back of the photo reads, “Working on forest fire above Eatonville on Bird Creek. Nate was cook and I was dish washer.

Wish I could zoom in a little closer to see what the men were eating.

Tom Smallwood says that Bird Creek is also known as Berg Creek, if you’re looking at  map. It flows into Lynch Creek at from the north.

If you’re looking for directions to the spot, Rich Williams says, “It’s located on (former) Weyerhaeuser property
up by the old Ohop Lookout tower. If you drive up the Weyerhaeuser Road to where the original gate used to be, the road forks just above this gate.  Take the fork to the left and drive about one mile, you will come to another road to your left. If you take that road you are on your way to where the old Ohop Lookout tower was located.  The first bridge you cross will be Lynch Creek. The second bridge you cross will be Bird Creek. Bird Creek is a very short tributary starting in the foothills below the lookout.
It travels a very short distance before it merges into Lynch Creek.

Photo courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

The Peterson Girls (ca. late 1920s)

LtoR: Anna Peterson, Helen Peterson, Alice Peterson, Pearl Peterson
LtoR: Anna Peterson, Helen Peterson, Alice Peterson, Pearl Peterson

Pictured here is left to right is: (Aunt) Anna, Helen, Alice and Pearl Peterson. The photo was taken with Helen’s new camera outside Torger Peterson’s original home in Ohop Valley. You won’t find the house there any longer. It’s now the hub of the Nisqually Land Trust’s work to restore salmon habitat.

Photo courtesy of Linda Lewis.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville Bank (ca. 1920s)

Eatonville Bank - sidewalks are in, but the road it still dirt
Eatonville Bank - sidewalks are in, but the road it still dirt

Eatonville Bank pictured has sidewalks, but the road is still dirt.

For a time, the second for of the bank was an apartment.

Photo courtesy of Rich Williams.

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Methodist Church Gets Face Life in 1915

Methodist Church ca. 1915
Methodist Church ca. 1915

You know the Methodist Church is one of the older buildings in Eatonville when it was getting a remodeled in 1915. Here are a few pictures of the church around that era.

The first image is a postcard from around 1915 — I assume before the remodel.  The second shot is taken in the early 1920s when the church built an addition. It looks like a brand new church.

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

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Methodist Church (ca. 1915) Side 2
Methodist Church (ca. 1915) Side 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Methodist Church (ca. 1921)
Methodist Church (ca. 1921)

July 4th in Morton (ca. 1920)

July 4th, Morton entry
July 4th parade, Morton entry

This photo shows Morton’s entry in the 4th of July parade around 1920.

The photos was Bebe Larkin’s, who I believe was the son of the editor of the Dispatch, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Larkin, back in 1950 through at least 1954.

If anyone else has information on this photo or Bebe Larkin, please feel free to comments.

Photo courtesy of Debbie & Gary Saint.

Click on image to enlarge.

Kids Outside Eatonville Lumber Company

Kids outside the Eatonville Lumber Co. (ca. 1920s)
Kids outside the Eatonville Lumber Co. (ca. 1920s)

These kids in their handmade go-kart look like they came straight out of a Little Rascals episode. They are poising outside the Eatonville Lumber Company.

I don’t know anything about the children, and if you do, please comment.

ELC Company Store
Want to take a peek inside the Eatonville Lumber Company store? Just click HERE.

Photos courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Kids and their go-kart outside the Eatonville Lumber Co. (ca. 1920s)
Kids and their go-kart outside the Eatonville Lumber Co. (ca. 1920s)

Elbe in the early 1920s

Elbe shop between meat market & hotel. Mr. Hardy owner of stores. Far R. John Bloom leaning on fence, Rev & Mrs. Karl Killian, center
Elbe hotel, shop, meat market

This shows Elbe as a booming little town. You can see the Elbe shop tucked between the grocery and the hardware store, as well Adam Sachs’ home up on the hilltop behind.

Mr. Hardy owned the stores. On the far left is R. John Bloom leaning on fence, Rev. and Mrs. Karl Kilian are standing next to him.

Karl Kilian was an early and beloved Lutheran missionary who designed the little Elbe Church. He served there from 1906 to 1935. Although he has been gone for many years, his church is still in use.

Information and photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton. 

Click on image to enlarge.

Drag Saws in the Woods

Eatonville Logger sitting beside his drag saw
Eatonville Logger sitting beside his drag saw

If this piece of logging equipment doesn’t look familiar, it’s because you’re more likely to see in a museum than the woods. This drag saw  was probably used in the 20s or 30s when they hit their stride.

Basically, the engine drags the saw back and forth, as if you were manually sawing down a tree. You can see one in action on this YouTube video.

Drag saws were the labor saving, tool of choice before chain saws hit the scene around in 1940s.

Photos courtesy of the Kjelstad family.

Click on images to enlarge.

Drag saw in operation

Drag saw in operation