1920s

Eatonville Lumber Company Locomotive

Locomotive for Eatonville Lumber Co. -  ca. 1920
Locomotive for Eatonville Lumber Co. - ca. 1920

When the Eatonville Lumber Company was in business, locam0tives were a common site.

Pat Van Eaton says the Eatonville Lumber Company used Climax and Shay locomotives. In fact, the lumber company had three geared locomitives, all standard gage, and 20 miles of track east of Eatonville. “They ceased rail logging in 1940 and their last locomotive — a 90-ton Shay — was cut up for scrap in 1945.”

Until 1941 the lumber company did its own logging from its own timber and did not, as a rule, buy logs. The company maintianed railroad tracks, owned locomotives and cars, and operated a logging camp. (History of Tacoma Eastern Area.)

Logging Locomotive ca. 1920
Logging Locomotive ca. 1920

Photos courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of Eatonville Lumber Company's locomotives (ca. 1920)
One of Eatonville Lumber Company's locomotives (ca. 1920)

The Eatonville Limousine of the 20s

Fred Fredricksen standing outside the current Sears store
Fred Fredricksen standing outside the current Sears store

Fred Fredricksen stands proudly, and for good reason. Fred is the driver of the first stage (taxi/limousine) from Eatonville to Tacoma using the East road.

Fred is standing on the dirt road front of Kipper’s Ford Garage, which the Sears store is today.

Photo is courtesy of Pat Van Eaton and the Taylor family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Summers Days, ca. 1920s

Kids in front of Theater and Methodist Church
Kids in front of Theater and Methodist Church

This shot just makes me smile. Summer day. Kids enjoying the sun. The sign on the Eatonville Theater reads there’s a show tonight. And the Methodist Church bell is just waiting to be rung.

I also like this picture because the kids are sitting on the grass almost where there is a grassy new lawn at the visitor’s center — where there were kids playing yesterday.

Thank god some things — like summer days — never change.

Pictured are:  Ruby Haynes Rulien (far rights), her younger brother, Arne O. Haynes, and two cousins.

Photo courtesy of the Haynes family.

Click to enlarge photo.

 

Eatonville Entertainment in 1920s — TNT Band

Monday Night Entertainment in Eatonville ca. 1920s
Monday Night Entertainment in Eatonville ca. 1920s

Entertainment was a bit different back in the 1920s. There were no streaming movies or iPods, but there was live music. Here is an Eatonville dance band — the TNT Band — that at least performed one Monday night.

Band members here were:
• E. Hillberg on bass drum
• Charley Williams on snare drum
• Canty with tuba
• Leon Williams, slide trombone
• F. Dunkhorst, conductor
• F. Canty – french horn (alto)
• Dave Peterson, cornet
• Axel Green, cornet
• H. Hekel, instrument in case

Eatonville Dance Band, Little TNT Band
Eatonville Dance Band, Little TNT Band

Picture courtesy of Rich & Ruthie Williams and Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Original King’s Place (1920s)

King's Place - first building ca. 1920s
King's Place - first building ca. 1920s

This was the original King’s Place located next door to the Ohop Grange on Highway 7. It was owned by Rosco B. and Lottie King. From the look of the cars, it looks like it was built in the 1920s.

It was a simple, one-pump gas station, and you have to wonder if it was maybe Lottie’s idea to dress things up with some flowers out front.

King’s place with transform over the years. Keep posted for more images and stories.

Photos courtesy of Margit Thorvaldson.

Click to enlarge photos.

King's Place - Original building, side shot
King's Place - Original building, side shot

 

 

 

 

Blasting to Make the Canyon Road

Blasting during the Canyon Road construction, 1920s
Blasting during the Canyon Road construction, 1920s

Constructing the Canyon Road not only took lots of man hours, but lots of  dynamite too. Based on this picture, there weren’t too many safety procedures in the 1920s. There are sticks of dynamite lying around the box and at this man’s feet!

This photo has some fabulous detail. If you zoom in you can even read the name of the explosives box — Trojan Powder, from the Trojan Powder Co., out of Oakland, Calf.  The company no longer exists, but they did create quite a mess from 1906 to 1965, and had to do some environmental clean up in the 1990s.

Picture courtesy of the Haynes family.

Click on photo to enlarge.

Canyon Road in the 1920s

Road through La Grande - Canyon
Road through La Grande - Canyon

I just drove down Canyon Road yesterday. It’s loaded with twists and turns and I take it whenever I can just for that reason.

Just found this picture (courtesy Rich Williams) of the road back in the 1920s. Looks a bit more hazardous.

Click to enlarge.

Fourth of July Then and Now

Eatonville July 4 looking South on Mashell Ave.
Eatonville July 4 looking South on Mashell Ave.

Eatonville has always been a fan of the 4th of July Parade. In fact, so many people take part in the parade, I’ve always been surprised there are still some left to watch.

Judging by these two photos, the cars may have changed, but not the enthusiasm.

Pictures courtesy of Pat Van Eaton and Diane Mettler.

Click photo to enlarge.

 

People lining Mashell, ready to watch the 2008 4th of July Parade
People lining Mashell, ready to watch the 2008 4th of July Parade

 

Creating Canyon Road – Pictoral (first set)

Every time I drive up Canyon Road I wonder what it took to carve a road out of side of a rock wall. And how hard would that be back in 1920 when the road was built?

It took a lot of strong men, hard work, what would today be considered extremely primitive machinery — and explosives.

Here are shots (courtesy of Pat Van Eaton) of the making of Canyon Road.

big bucket
Big Bucket
Machinery on hillside - Canyon Road
Machinery on hillside - Canyon Road
Moving Rock, Canyon Rd.
Moving Rock, Canyon Rd.
Creating Canyon Road
Building Canyon Road
Dropping Dirt
Dropping Dirt
Torger Peterson, McDowell and grandson at the Canyon Rd. Building
Torger Peterson, McDowell and grandson at the Canyon Rd. Building