1946

School Days – 1940s

Mrs. Fuller's 3rd grade class, April 1944
Miss Fuller's 3rd grade class, April 1944

This week is the first week of classes for Eatonville students. I thought it might be a good time to show some of the cherry students headed back to school 70 years ago.

Photos courtesy of the Taylor family.

Click on images  to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

Miss Douglas's 4th and 5th grade class, 1945
Miss Douglas's 4th and 5th grade class, 1945

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mrs. Velma Kjelstad's 6th grade class, 1947-8
Mrs. Velma Kjelstad's 6th grade class, 1947-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mrs. B. Bailey's 2&4 class, 1946
Mrs. B. Bailey's 2&4 class, 1946

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miss Stinnette's 1946'7 5th grade class
Miss Stinnette's 1946'7 5th grade class

The Smith Brothers

The Smith Brothers (Lee, Nathaniel, Milton, Larry, Brown, Noah and Clinton)
The Smith Brothers (Lee, Nathaniel, Milton, Larry, Brown, Noah and Clinton)

Samuel P. and Mary West Smith struck out for the West from North Carolina. They  settled outside Eatonville in an area called Stringtown back in around 1888.

They had eight sons. One remained in N.C., but the others came out west and make their mark.

Pictured here are:
• Lee Smith
• Nathaniel Smith
• Milton Smith
• Larry Smith
• Brown Smith
• Noah (Noteke) Smith
• Clinton Smith

Most of the boys took to the woods, either logging or doing something else in the lumber industry. Larry, however, took a job as the Eatonville school district janitor in 1916 and worked that job until 1946.

Backside of Smith Photos
Backside of Smith Photos

Clint, Larry, S. P., N. W., B. A. and S. L. were among the signers of the petition requesting incorporation of the Town of Eatonville in 1909. Clint Smith was elected Councilman of the first Town election. And S. L. Smith was the Town Marshal in 1912. (History of Southeastern Pierce County.)

Noah also became quite the boxer — some say world famous.

Photo courtesy of the Smith family.

Click on image to enlarge.

The Alder Store – 1946

Alder Store, ca. 1946
Alder Store, ca. 1946

The Alder Store (around 1946) serviced folks not only in Alder, but those headed up to to Mount Rainier.

Much of Alder was moved or taken down when the dam was built and the area was flooded. This store, however, was built after the flooding and was owned by Carl Rotter and his wife Veora (Rathbone) Rotter.

Thank you Pat Van Eaton for the photo.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Lumberman’s Hospital (ca 1920s)

Lumberman's Hospital
Lumberman's Hospital

Recognize this building? It’s the home across from the high school on Mashell, only back in the day it was the Lumberman’s Hospital.

Insurance for Loggers
Dr. A. W. Bridge has a contract with the Eatonville Lumber Company employees where each employee paid $1.00 per month for medical care. Dr. Bridge also had doctors in Kapowsin, Minaerl, Ashford and Morton. (There were no shortage of patients will all the logging taking place.)

In 1923 Dr. Bridge opened offices in Tacoma and in 1926 opened the Bridge Clinic in Tacoma specializing in surgery.

Lumberman's Hospital (across from high school)
Lumberman's Hospital (across from high school)

He continued the hospital in Eatonville until 1932 and had doctors in town until 1946 — the year he retired. All the Bridge Clinic contracts with industrial concerned expired the last week of May, 1946, and the local union signed up with the Pierce County medical Bureau.  (History of Tacoma Eastern Area)

Photos courtesy of Debbie and Gary Saint.

Click on images to enlarge.

Malcolms Make Their Mark

Ollie Malcom looks out from behind the counter at his meat market in this 1925 photo.
Ollie Malcom looks out from behind the counter at his meat market in this 1925 photo.

When Olaf Malcom arrived in 1918, he couldn’t have imagined the impact his family would have.

Olaf Malcom was a second-generation butcher from Norway. He homesteaded just outside Eatonville (where Rich Collins lives today) and built a slaughterhouse. The young entrepreneur opened up meat markets in Eatonville (currently the vacant building across from Tall Timber), Kapowsin, Mineral and Morton.

His entrepreneurial spirit was passed along to his children. His oldest son, Barney built a store and restaurant in 1946 on Meridian outside Eatonville. The building is no longer there, but you probably know it as “Barney’s Corner”.

Keith Malcolm, the next oldest son, started out as meat cutter like his dad. “I was raised around it. It’s what I knew.”

Eatonville Red & White Store around 1955
Eatonville Red & White Store around 1955

In 1946, after three and a half years in the Navy, Keith opened his own meat market in the Red and White store (today the parking lot next to Kirk’s Pharmacy). The Red and White was originally been T.C. Van Eaton’s store, with wood floors that had been cleaned with oil and sawdust.

Getting into Grocery
“My dad told me to just stick with meat cutting. Don’t get into grocery,” says Keith with a smile. He followed his father’s advice and just ran the meat cutting side alongside Jess Dawkins who ran the grocery in the Red and White. But a couple years later Keith bought Jess out.

In 1963, after 17 years in the Red and White, Keith and his wife Delores, made the jump and built the Shop Rite store (now the medical billing center). From 1963 to 1979 he managed the store, employed local folks, and had some interesting promotions, like “Guess the Pig’s Weight”.

ShopRite on Center
ShopRite on Center

“Rich Collins supplied the pig and fed it for me,” says Keith “And we had a pen in the store and for about 30 days we had people guessing its weight.”

Developing Eatonville
There was no stopping the Malcolm family when it came to starting businesses. “We built Malcom’s Deli Drive-in in the 1970s, [now Brunos] but we never developed the Drive-in,” says Delores with a laugh. She ran the deli for several years and says that was probably the hardest work she’s known — and she would know coming from a large logging family.

In the 70s they also built the Shell station (down near Arrow Lumber). In 1987 they built the Milltown Mall, then the Milltown Motel in 1992-93, which they ran for 6 or 7 years. Did I mention they also built the storage units, the mobile home park, and the office space across from Arrow?

“There was a need and we built it,” says Keith.

And to think it started with one meat cutter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Van Eaton Chevrolet – 1946

Van Eaton Chev ca 1946 — Building #1
Van Eaton Chev ca 1946 — Building #1

You probably know it better today as Sorensen’s — the automobile repair shop on Mashell. But it was built back in around 1946 and was known as Van Eaton’s Chevrolet. Here are few number of pictures of its building and finished product.

The people in the snow in the last photo are Roy Mack and on the left and Bill Brainard on the right.

Photos Courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #2
Building Van Eaton Chev #2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #3
Building Van Eaton Chev #3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #4
Building Van Eaton Chev #4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #5
Building Van Eaton Chev #5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #6
Building Van Eaton Chev #6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #7
Building Van Eaton Chev #7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #8
Building Van Eaton Chev #8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #9
Building Van Eaton Chev #9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #10
Building Van Eaton Chev #10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #11
Building Van Eaton Chev #11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Van Eaton Chev #12
Building Van Eaton Chev #12

 

 

 

 

 

 

Van Eaton Chevrolet - Snow storm #1
Van Eaton Chevrolet – Snow storm #1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Van Eaton Chevrolet - Snow storm #3
Van Eaton Chevrolet – Snow storm #3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Van Eaton Chevrolet - Snow storm #4
Van Eaton Chevrolet – Snow storm #4

Mashell Avenue Through the Years

Mashell Ave ca 1913
Mashell Ave ca 1913

We’re lucky that so many people have taken pictures of Eatonville over the years — and saved them. Here’s a look at Mashell Avenue through the years and its transformation.

Photos Courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click to enlarge photos.

 

 

 

Mashell Ave ca 1946
Mashell Ave ca 1946

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mashell Ave ca 1955
Mashell Ave ca 1955

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mashell Ave ca 1972
Mashell Ave ca 1972