Clyde Williams

Tribute to Hettie Williams

Hettie Williams
Hettie Duncan Williams as a young woman

There are just certain people who keep things running. They’re are involved, but don’t need notoriety. They can work hard, while making you feel at ease. One of those individuals was Hettie (Duncan) Williams.

Hettie parents, Margaret (1846-1916) and Charles (1853-1933), had six daughters. In 1907 Hettie married a young Eatonville man, by the name of Clyde Williams, and they were together for 58 years.

Grandson, Rich Williams, says, “She was far and away the saint of the Williams clan. Everybody loved her. She was a member of the Rebecca’s, was given an honorary award for her participation in the Eatonville P.T.A., was the first chairman of the Mary Bridge Orthopedic Guild and was always front and center for any charitable event.”

Rich adds, “When she attended the basketball games my brother and I played in, you could hear her cheering us on as well as arguing with the refs if Jon or I committed a foul.”

Hettie died of cancer in 1965. Rich recalls, “It was the evening of my Senior Ball. I can still see the light on in her bedroom as we drove by their house when I was taking my date home that night.”

Hettie Williams as an older woman
Hettie Williams as an older woman

To all you great women of Eatonville, we tip our hats today!

Photos courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

Hettie Duncan Williams (bottom right) with parents and sisters
Hettie Duncan Williams (bottom right) with parents and sisters

 

Clyde Willaims
Clyde Willaims

 

Hettie Duncan Williams' parents -
Hettie Duncan Williams’ parents – Charles and Margaret

 

Early Ambulances (and the Rising Corpse)

First Ambulance
First Ambulance

When Dr. A. W. Bridge had a patient in his 1914 Model T ambulance, he found it difficult to check on the patient’s condition unless he stopped the ambulance first. The patient’s cot was behind him and he couldn’t twist around and observe the patient and drive at the same time.

Custom Changes
Dr. Bridge came up with an idea. He would cut away the passenger’s half of the front seat and lengthen the steering shaft. The combination would put the patient’s head beside him and he could simply glance down from time to time to see how the patient was getting along. The idea worked, but the long steering shaft made the vehicle difficult to handle.

Dr. Bridge asked Dr. Claude E. Wiseman to take the ambulance calls, but after a trip in the altered ambulance Dr. Wiseman told Dr. Bridge, “It’s your invention. You drive it.” So, Dr. Bridge hired a young Clyde Williams as driver and Clyde drove the altered vehicle from 1914 to 1915.

Lumbermans Hospital - Mashell Ave.
Lumbermans Hospital – Mashell Ave.

New Ambulance
In 1915, Mr. Bridge replaced the Model T and Mr. Williams remembered the new Model T well. It had 40 horsepower and was so light that when a tire had to be changed, a couple of men could lift the vehicle onto blocks.

The vehicle’s body overhung the rear wheels to an extent that a heavy weight on the back caused the front wheels rise off the ground.

Like all Model T’s though, it had lots of ground clearance, which was important. Mr. Williams — sometimes accompanied by Dr. Bridge and sometimes alone — often drove where there were no roads or only a trail to reach remote houses.

The Corpse
Mr. Williams chiefly remembered the vehicle for the hair-raising experience when a deceased patient was loaded into the ambulance. Mr. Williams was half way to Eatonville when the dead man slowly rose to a sitting position. Rigor mortis had set in and the contracting muscles caused him to sit up.

“When I saw him start to sit up, I nearly went through the roof,” recalled Mr. Williams.

Hazel and Helen Williams

Hazel Williams early 1900s
Hazel Williams early 1900s

This stunning woman is Hazel Williams, daughter of Nate Williams. Nate was a rough and tumble man who came with T.C. Van Eaton (his brother-in-law) in 1889 to homestead in the new town of Eatonville.

Hazel was one of six children, Tom, Charlie, Leon and Clyde and Carrie. She and Carrie both died when they were quite young. The baby in Hazel’s arms is  Helen Williams.

Photos courtesy of  the Williams family.

Hazel and Helen Williams
Hazel and Helen Williams

Click on images to enlarge.

Logging — 1902 to 1970

Eatonville logging in 1902
Eatonville logging in 1902 — George Martin is the teamster and Clyde Williams is the passenger

Logging was vital to Eatonville form the very beginning. Here are a few pictures covering seven decades of logging.

Photo #1: This first picture was taken September 1902, and the log is headed off for the Eatonville Saw Mill. (The men might have hit the Brewery behind the hotel afterwards.)

Photo #2: I’m not sure of the date, but it’s Clyde Williams on the right helping fall this enormous fir tree.

Photo #3: In the early 1900’s the steam donkey was quickly replacing horses . Here is C. Boettcher operating a yarder with a steam engine.

Photo #4: Around 1950 we have Murphy’s Logging Company showing of a one-log load. The truck is parked in front of Christensen Motors (where Sears stands today).

Clyde Williams on right helping fall a tree
Clyde Williams on right helping fall a tree

Photo #5. Dick Taylor, who was also Eatonville’s fire chief for 12 years, stands in front of this load of Weyerhaeuser wood.

Photos courtesy of Williams family, Taylor Family and Pat Van Eaton

Click on images to enlarge.

C. Boettcher on Yarder —  Glenn Parks Operator
C. Boettcher on Yarder — Glenn Parks Operator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Murphy Logging Company's one-log load
Murphy Logging Company's one-log load

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dick Taylor with load of Weyerhaeuser wood, 1970
Dick Taylor with load of Weyerhaeuser wood, 1970

First Boiler headed to Elbe Sawmill

Moving First Boiler to Sawmill, early 1900s
Moving First Boiler to Sawmill, early 1900s

This boiler, headed to a sawmill around Elbe, was the latest in technology. Men were moving away from horse power and toward steam power. In fact, this boiler may have well been on it’s way be incorporated into a steam donkey.

To the left of the photo is Adam and Lloyd Sachs. Lloyd had the distinction of being the first child born in Elbe. Henry Luikens is the bearded man beside them.

Nate Williams is standing in the middle by the horses.  Sitting on top of the boiler is his son Clyde Williams, and his other son, Charley, is the young man on the boiler with the dog.

Photo courtesy of Rich Williams and Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.