early 1900s

Eatonville Baseball (early 1900s)

Eatonville Baseball Team (early 1900s)
Eatonville Baseball Team (early 1900s)

With a state full of of Seahawk fans, it’s hard to image that not long ago it was baseball that got folks excited. You didn’t just root your team on, you joined a team.

“Nothing unified a company town—or any other town in the early 1900s—like baseball. Virtually every company town and many family camps had at least one team. In some company towns prowess on the baseball diamond was a guarantee of employment.”

“As early as 1904, the McCleary, Washington, loggers and mill hands were vying against teams from neighboring towns.” (Company Town of the Pacific Northwest)

If you have names from some of our local baseball players, please share!

Image courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Nisqually Glacier (early 1900s)

Nisqually Glacier
Nisqually Glacier

The Nisqually Glacier was something to behold in the early 1900s when you traveled up to Mount Rainier. Unfortunately, it’s doesn’t quite look like that today.

The National Park Services says, “The Nisqually is one the 25 major glaciers at Mount Rainier. [It] has shown dramatic changes in dimension within the last century.”

To give you an idea of the dramatic change they are talking about, here is a image taken form the University of Washington website. It charts the glacier’s evolution over the last century. To read more, just click here.

Nisqually Glacier evolution
Nisqually Glacier evolution

Images provided by Diane Mettler and courtesy of the University of Washington.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Snow in Elbe (early 1900s)

Snow covered Elbe - early 1900s
Snow covered Elbe – early 1900s

A glimpse of Elbe under a blanket of snow in the early 1900s. The main street would have been off to the right.

For a similar picture — sans snow — just click HERE.

Photo courtesy of the South Pierce County historical Society.

Click on image to enlarge.

Looking Down Mashell Ave. (early 1900s)

Looking Down Mashell Ave.
Looking Down Mashell Ave.

In the early years, people in Eatonville took lots of pictures of Mashell Ave. This one was entitled “Looking Down Mashell Ave.” You can see the old theater (well, not so old then) on the left.

There seems to be come activity in the middle of the street. I can’t tell what it is. Looks like might be some kids picking up rocks? If you know, please share.

Photo courtesy of the South Pierce County Historical Society.

Click on image to enlarge.

Charles Boettcher’s Pond, Alder, Wash. (early 1900s)

C. Boettcher log pond in Alder, Wash.
C. Boettcher log pond in Alder, Wash.

This picture is entitled “C. Boettcher log pond head works, Alder, Wa.”.

The pond and the logs may not seem all that impressive at first glance, but look closely. There is a man standing on one of the logs to give you some scale. Many of these trees are massive!

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Logging in the Snow with a Steam Donkey

Steam donkey near Eatonville
Steam donkey near Eatonville

Kjelstad 012It’s cold out today and I feel for everyone who is working out there today in bitter temperatures. In keeping with the frosty weather, here are two shots from an early 1900’s logging operation around Eationville.

The steam donkey is in operation here. It was high tech for its time. Simply put, it was a steam-powered winch.

Photos courtesy of the Kjelstad family.

Click on images to enlarge.

Mineral Hotel

Mineral Hotel
Mineral Hotel

In the early 1900s, when you visited you Mineral, you could stay at the Mineral Hotel, with a spectacular view of Mineral Lake.

Photo courtesy of Corlene Iverson and Family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Henry Horn’s Shingle Mill, Elbe

Henry Horn's shingle mill, Elbe
Henry Horn’s shingle mill, Elbe

A wintery shot of Henry Horn’s shingle mill in Eble taken in the early 1900s.

Before composite roofs, most roofs in this area were made from shingles. A shingle mill “was used to slice a section of log into tapered wedges to create shingles.

To see what these old machines looked like, just click HERE.

Photo courtesy of Lottie Shaefer Marrow, Ashford, Wash., & the SPC Historical Society.

Click on image to enlarge.