early 1900s

The Williams Men (early 1900s)

Back: Clyde Williams and Charlie Williams, Front, Leon Williams and Nate Williams
Back: Clyde Williams and Charlie Williams, Front, Leon Williams and Nate Williams

Someone was able gather up the Williams men for this early 1900s shot. Pictured in the back, left to right, is Clyde Williams and Charlie Williams. Front, left to right, is Leon Williams and Nate Williams.

Each of these men played a role in the town’s history. If you would like to know more, just click on their names.

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

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Logging Car and the Ladies (early 1900s)

The Large and Small Logs
The Large and Small Logs

This photos entitled The Lage and Small Logs is somewhat haunting.

You rarely see women in the woods, especially not with a child and her doll. There are a lot of other details in this photo that are work checking out, like pin holding the logs in the rail car, the butts of the trees that show how the men hacked into the tree with sawing.

Photo courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborne.

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The Guys of the Eatonville Lumber Co.

Eatonville Lumber Co. (early 1900s)
Eatonville Lumber Co. (early 1900s)

Check out the team at the Eatonville Lumber Company, which in the early 1900s included the horses.  I love the guy in the back waving at us.

The mill burned in 1932 and was a blow to the town. The fire wasn’t enough to stop them though. By August, 1933 it was up and running again.

This picture is part of the University of Washington Library.

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Logging in the Early Days

Logging around Eatonville
Logging around Eatonville

These photos come courtesy of the Kjelstad family. There are lots of shots of men standing beside their equipment or downed trees, but it’s fun to see them clowning it up a bit from time to time.

The second shot I find amusing. The man standing second to the right looks like he’s had one hell of a day — like survived a fire. Then the logger second to the left looks like a he models in his off time.

Here’s to the loggers that kept our mills humming.

Loggers in the early days
Loggers in the early days

Photos courtesy of the Kjelstad family.

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Early Loggers

Early loggers
Early loggers

This pictures ran in a 1989 edition of the Dispatch. The caption reads:

Logging quickly became the main industry in the area, supporting a number of mills in Eatonville, Alder, Elbe, Ashford, National and many other more short-lived communities. When this photo was taken trees were felled without the benefit of chainsaws and forests were cleared wtihout the aid of builldozers or logging trucks. These men worked in an industry where injury was a common acquaintance and death no stranger.

On that last note, you can see why so many were injured. Safety equipment had yet to be developed.

Photo courtesy of the Dispatch.

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Mineral’s Mill (early 1900s)

Logs being dumped into the water at Mineral, Wash.
Logs being dumped into the water at Mineral, Wash.

Here are a couple great shots of milling in Mineral, Wash., earlier in the early 1900s. You rarely get action shots, like this one of the log falling into the mill pond.

Mineral got it’s start as a mining town. Prospectors came searching for gold and found coal and arsenic, which was both unfortunately and unhealthy. The would-be gold town turned to its trees and was the home of a logging camp and sawmill, neither of which you’ll find there today. You will, however, find some great fishing.

Photos courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Milling in Mineral (early 1900s)
Milling in Mineral (early 1900s)

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Mr. Larson and his Horse

John Larson and his horse
John Larson and his horse

It’s hard to understand how important your horses were before the combustable engine took over the hard farming labor. They helped plow, bring in hay, pull wagons . . . you name it. This is a shot of Eatonville pioneer and Ohop Valley farmer John Larson and his horse, probably taken in the early 1900s. It might just be me, but looks a little proud.

Photo courtesy of Linda Lewis.

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