Eatonville High School

Class of 1981

David Reichel
David Reichel

It’s my Eatonville class of 1981’s reunion today. Since we’re a small piece of the community’s history, I thought I’d share a few photos.

We were an amazing group of kids full of energy and untapped potential. Today we’re even more amazing adults. I’m proud to say I was part of the class of ’81.

Photos courtesy of the Eatonville yearbooks.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

Mike Hoffman, Jake Jacobson, Pat Suver, Luke Poole
Mike Hoffman, Jake Jacobson, Pat Suver, Luke Poole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top: Carol Wells, Diane Mettler, Kelli Mettler  Bottom: Julie Leigh, Jonni Hale, Sally Potts, Janette Bertram
Top: Karel Wells, Diane Mettler, Kelli Mettler Bottom: Julie Leigh, Jonni Hale, Sally Potts, Janette Bertram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Byers, Dennis Modahl, Jack Roy, Jeff Burgess
Brian Byers, Dennis Modahl, Jack Roy, Jeff Burgess

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shawn Parrish, Shelly Smith
Shawn Parrish, Shelly Smith

Earthquakes Rock Eatonville

Eatonville Grade School
Eatonville Grade School

Eatonville is no stranger to earthquakes. One that left lasting memories shook the place up on April 13, 1949. At 11:52 am the town started rocking and rolling.

Many recall the cement streets rolling like waves. Margit Thorvaldson says she was in the grocery store at the time and it took her a moment to realize what was happening. She remembers a woman more “earthquake savvy” than herself move to a doorway as items fell from the shelves.

School & Town Take hit
Although over a dozen chimneys fell, the Hotes building (100 S. Mashell) had damage and the wood reservoir feeding the Eatonville Lumber company engine had to be replaced. It was the high school, however, that got the worst of it.

Louie Mettler says he was eating in the cafeteria when it hit. “I remember they were serving peaches, because peaches were flying all over.  We were jumping out the windows and hauling others out.”

Washington Earthquakes (www.geology.com)
Washington Earthquakes (www.geology.com)

The auditorium and cafeteria were out of the commission for the rest of the year and engineers from Tacoma came and attached steel rods and shored things up.

It could have been much worse. The Dispatch reported that the entire student body has been scheduled to be in the auditorium from 11 to 12. Luckily, the assembly had been let out a little early that day — minutes before the quake hit.

The Lighter Side
Roy Swanson, an eighth grader at the time, remembers he and Kenny Hamilton walking downtown and seeing all the smashed bottles at the liquor store. The manager later gave out corks to many of the regular customers.

And Mrs. Otto Haynes told the Dispatch that the quake fixed the clock in their car. No one had been able to fix it for two years and the experts in Seattle said it was beyond repair. “It started right after the quake and has run fine every since.”

Continual Quakes
This was hardly the last of it. Since then, we’ve weathered the following:

• a 3.6 tremor in 1979.
• a 4.1 earthquake in 1995, which caused little damage, but got the town council looking into an emergency plan
• a damaging 6.8 quake that lasted 40 seconds in February, 2001. Despite the fact that the quake happened 30 miles under ground, it still caused cracks in the gymnasium wall and tennis court. It was also reported that the water tower of Dow Ridge moved 4 inches off its cement resting pad. This time around though, the liquor store only lost two bottles.

(Much of the information comes from Timber Town and Later by Edith Erickson and the Dispatch.)

 

 

 

 

First Eatonville Graduate

Ed Christensen, 1st Eatonville Grad, 1914
Ed Christensen, 1st Eatonville Grad, 1914

The first Eatonville High School graduate was Ed Christensen. The photo says he graduated in 1914 — the same year the first red-green traffic light was used and Edgar Rice Burroughs published Tarzan of the Apes.

Ed Christensen would go on to fight in WW1.

On September 12, 1919 Eatonville gave a “Welcome Home” for the men who had returned from service.

Ed was one of the 33 men who “fell into line at the upper end of Mashell Avenue at the command of J. H. Cosper, formerly First Lieutenant of the 7th Infantry, and Red Men’s Hall. A Welcome Home address was given by T. C. Van Eaton after an introduction by Mayor Bridge. R. A. Canty, fomerly of the stated at Camp Lewis, gave the response.”  (History of South Eastern Pierce County.)

Just two year later, in June of 1921, Ed would die tragically from electrocution while repairing a motor at Camp Lewis.

Photo Courtesy of the Haynes family.

Ed Christensen, First Eatonville Graduate
Ed Christensen, First Eatonville Graduate

Click on images to enlarge.

School Busses (1940’s)

Eatonville School - busses 1950s
Eatonville School – busses 1950s

Kids have been catching the busses at Eatonville for over half a century.

If you enlarge the photo you’ll see on the side of the bus it reads: Eatonville School District 335.

Interesting Fact: School bus yellow is a color especially formulated in 1939 for use on school buses in North America. It was originally called “national school bus chrome.”

Photo courtesy of the Tacoma Public Library.

Click on photo to enlarge.

Eatonville Auditorium — Then & Now (1915-2011)

Auditorium in 1915, equipped with fire proof motion picture booth
Auditorium in 1915, equipped with fire proof motion picture booth

The Eatonville High School has gone through a number of transformations over the last century. Here’s the 1915 state-of the-art auditorium (with a fire proof motion picture booth), next to the 2011 version.

Even with all the changes, you can still see some similarities.

Photos courtesy of Eatonville High School, Haynes family and Pat Van Eaton.

Click to enlarge photo.

 

 

 

Eatonville High School Auditorium 2011
Eatonville High School Auditorium 2011

Eatonville Gym — Then and Now

State of the art gym ca. 1915
State of the art gym ca. 1915

Eatonville High School has always had a great gym. Back in 1915 the Eatonville had a gym that was second to none.

You could find:
• An inside track around the balcony seats
• A boxing ring
• A swimming pool — 36′ by 18′
• All the latest equipment — rings, climbing ropes and more.

In the 2009, Eatonville remodeled the high school and the gym got another facelift.

Here are just a few “then” and “now” shots.

Click on images to enlarge.

Weight Room, 2011
Weight Room, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5th Grade Boys using the gym in ca. 1915
5th Grade Boys using the gym in ca. 1915

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gym, 2011
Gym, 2011