Eatonville Lumber Company

The Guys of the Eatonville Lumber Co.

Eatonville Lumber Co. (early 1900s)
Eatonville Lumber Co. (early 1900s)

Check out the team at the Eatonville Lumber Company, which in the early 1900s included the horses.  I love the guy in the back waving at us.

The mill burned in 1932 and was a blow to the town. The fire wasn’t enough to stop them though. By August, 1933 it was up and running again.

This picture is part of the University of Washington Library.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville Lumber Company Saloon

Eatonville Lumber Company Saloon, with John Galbraith
Eatonville Lumber Company Saloon, with John Galbraith

I guess it should come as no surprise that the Eatonville Lumber Company also had an Eatonville Lumber Company saloon.

The man standing front and center in a suit is none other than John Galbraith, who eventually because the owner of the mill. In 1922, he was also Mayor of Eatonville. You may recognize his amazing home, which still stands today near old mill site.

Photo courtesy of Rick Parnell and the Parnell family.

Click on images to enlarge. 

Paintings & Pictures of the Abandoned Eatonville Lumber Mill

Painting of Eatonville Lumber Mill by Martha Parrish
Painting of Eatonville Lumber Mill by Martha Parrish

Martha Parrish painted some wonder scenes of Eatonville, including this painting of the abandoned Eatonville Lumber Mill.

Here is an image of the final painting along with the shots she took for inspiration.

Images courtesy of Leslee Dunlap and Martha Parrish.

Abandon Eatonville Lumber Mill 2
Abandon Eatonville Lumber Mill 2

Click on images to enlarge.

Abandon Eatonville Lumber Mill 3
Abandon Eatonville Lumber Mill 3
Abandon Eatonville Lumber Mill 4
Abandon Eatonville Lumber Mill 4

 

Eatonville Lumber Company Wagon

Eatonville Lumber Co. General Merchandise wagon
Eatonville Lumber Co. General Merchandise wagon

The Eatonville Lumber Company started up before there were automobiles. Here is a unique shot of the Eatonville Lumber Company Co. General Merchandise wagon.

Olympic Flour was produced by The Puget Sound Flouring Mills Company.

Flour Mills
Here’s a little information on the history of Washington’s flour mills. For much more information on it, just click HERE to link to the History Link.

“The trade with the Orient and the growing Western Washington population encouraged larger and more modern flour mills to be established in the Puget Sound cities. First in Seattle was the Novelty Mills, out towards West Seattle. Centennial built its mill on the waterfront just south of the current sports domes, opening in 1898. By 1906 that stretch of waterfront was home to three mills: the Hammond Milling Company, Albers Cereal Mills, and Centennial. The Fisher Flouring Mills opened on Harbor Island in 1911. Seattle now had seven mills, as the Chas. Lilly Company produced flour as well as seeds, feeds, and fertilizer, and City Mills was just north of downtown. Tacoma had the Puget Sound Flouring Mills, the Tacoma Grain Company, Watson & Olds, Albers Milling Company, and the Cascade Cereal Mills.”

Photo courtesy of Rick Parnell and the Parnell family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Thank you! Over 58,600 views in 2012

Snow storm 1915-16, Mashell Bridge and Eatonville Lumber Co.
Snow storm 1915-16, Mashell Bridge and Eatonville Lumber Co.

THANK YOU to everyone who has visited this site and made it a success. In 2012 there were 58,623 visits — roughly 19 times the population of Eatonville.

Your input is making this a valuable addition to Eatonville’s history.

Hopefully 2013 will be one historians will look back on kindly.

Happy New Year!!

Diane

Photo courtesy of the Christensen family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville Lumber Company “Lumberjills” (WWII)

Eatonville  Lbr. Co. Crew 1940's —Eva Tappero, Ruth Logston and Yolonda Marianni
Eatonville Lbr. Co. Crew 1940’s —Eva Tappero, Ruth Logston and Yolonda Marianni

During WWII, while the men were away fighting, the women stepped in to fill their jobs and keep America running. It took place in every corner of the nation, even in Eatonville.

Here are two shots of “lumberjills” — women who worked at the Eatonville Lumber Company in the 1940s.

The three mill workers in the first shot are Eva Tappero, Ruth Logston and Yolonda Marianni. I’m not sure who the women are in the second shot, but if you know, please let me know.

Photos courtesy of Dick Logston.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville  Lbr. Co. Female Crew 1940's
Eatonville Lbr. Co. Female Crew 1940’s