Logging

Murray Logging & Timber Co., in Mineral Wash.

Murray Logging & Timber Co.
Murray Logging & Timber Co.

You need to zoom in on this shot of Murray Logging & Timber Co., out of Mineral, Wash. Look at the men in the bottom lefthand corner to get feel for how BIG these logs really are.

I believe the pictures was taken in the 1920s, but if someone has more information on it, please let me know.

The Murray family still operates their tree farm (around 65,000 acres) outside town. There is also a Murray Logging Museum in Mineral, Wash. If you get a chance, check it out.

Photo courtesy of  Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on image to enlarge.

Logging in the Snow with a Steam Donkey

Steam donkey near Eatonville
Steam donkey near Eatonville

Kjelstad 012It’s cold out today and I feel for everyone who is working out there today in bitter temperatures. In keeping with the frosty weather, here are two shots from an early 1900’s logging operation around Eationville.

The steam donkey is in operation here. It was high tech for its time. Simply put, it was a steam-powered winch.

Photos courtesy of the Kjelstad family.

Click on images to enlarge.

Taking down those BIG trees

Logging the early years — Clyde Williams
Logging the early years — Clyde Williams

These three men were photographed taking down one of the large trees near Eatonville. On the right, on the springboard, is Clyde Williams.

They made the men tough back then. I don’t know about you, but if it was me who had to take down this tree with two of my girlfriends, I think you’d have to give us several months to do the job.

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Logging Car and the Ladies (early 1900s)

The Large and Small Logs
The Large and Small Logs

This photos entitled The Lage and Small Logs is somewhat haunting.

You rarely see women in the woods, especially not with a child and her doll. There are a lot of other details in this photo that are work checking out, like pin holding the logs in the rail car, the butts of the trees that show how the men hacked into the tree with sawing.

Photo courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborne.

Click on image to enlarge.

Logging the Big Trees

Logging in the Eatonville/Mineral area
Logging in the Eatonville/Mineral area

There is always the question, “How did the Egyptians those pyramids?” The bigger question for me is, “How did those loggers taken down those giant trees with those little, and manually powered, saws?”

The answer is probably the same in both cases — lots and lots of muscle. If anyone knows who these two hardworking and extremely strong men are, please speak up.

Logging term of the day — Springboard: A lightly flexible, iron-shod, strong board, that’s inserted into a notch chopped into a tree and used as a precarious platform from which the tree is felled. A relic of hand-power days, it now has only a few practitioners.

Photo courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on image to enlarge.

Pacific National & Westfork Timber – 1926 & 1928

Westfork Logging co, Mineral WA  Sept 1928
Westfork Logging co, Mineral WA Sept 1928

These shots of Pacific National Lumber Co., out of National, Wash., abnd Westfork Timber, out of Mineral, Wash., were taken by renowned photographer Kinsey in 1926 and 1928. He (and his brother) were able to catch the loggers, the forests  and the logger’s life like no other photographer.

Pacific National Lumber Co., is no longer, but Westfork is still around.

If you would like to see a movie of Westfork Logging back in the 1930s, just click HERE.

Photos courtesy of the South Pierce County Historical Society.

Pac National Lumber co., National, Wash., Sept 1926
Pac National Lumber co., National, Wash., Sept 1926

Click on images to enlarge.

Logging in the Early Days

Logging around Eatonville
Logging around Eatonville

These photos come courtesy of the Kjelstad family. There are lots of shots of men standing beside their equipment or downed trees, but it’s fun to see them clowning it up a bit from time to time.

The second shot I find amusing. The man standing second to the right looks like he’s had one hell of a day — like survived a fire. Then the logger second to the left looks like a he models in his off time.

Here’s to the loggers that kept our mills humming.

Loggers in the early days
Loggers in the early days

Photos courtesy of the Kjelstad family.

Click on images to enlarge.

Sawmill at National

Logs at National sawmill
Logs at National sawmill

Two shots taken at the sawmill in National early in the 1900s.

The shorts are more of a before and after. The first shot you can see the logs rolling into the water. The second you can see the finished lumber.

Laurie says, “The first picture if the last load of logs dumped into the National mill pond. It was taken by my grandfather, Lee Osborn and past on to me by my father Orville Osborn.”

Click on images to enlarge.Photos courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Lumber at National Sawmill
Lumber at National Sawmill

 

Mineral’s Mill (early 1900s)

Logs being dumped into the water at Mineral, Wash.
Logs being dumped into the water at Mineral, Wash.

Here are a couple great shots of milling in Mineral, Wash., earlier in the early 1900s. You rarely get action shots, like this one of the log falling into the mill pond.

Mineral got it’s start as a mining town. Prospectors came searching for gold and found coal and arsenic, which was both unfortunately and unhealthy. The would-be gold town turned to its trees and was the home of a logging camp and sawmill, neither of which you’ll find there today. You will, however, find some great fishing.

Photos courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Milling in Mineral (early 1900s)
Milling in Mineral (early 1900s)

Click on images to enlarge.