Mashell Ave.

Eatonville Bank, 1964 . . . Take a Look at those Signs

Eatonville Bank 1964
Eatonville Bank 1964

These shots of the Eatonville Bank are interesting, not just because they were taken in 1964, and things haven’t changed all that much, but because also of the sign out front.

Listed are the following if you continued on Center Street:
19 National
14 Elbe
32 Tacoma
2 Mountain Highway

If you were going to continue on Mashell:
LaGrande
8 Alder
15 Elbe
20 National
22 Ashford
30 Morton
White Pass

Eatonville Bank (2) 1964
Eatonville Bank (2) 1964

29 Rainier National Park, Via Scenic Route
5 Clay City
10 Kapowsin
25 Puyallup
52 Seattle
17 Yelm
30 Tacoma

Gary Hendrickson said he used to live in the arpartment over the bank, and it looks from this shot that there was still an apartment.

If you want to read more about the bank—and the robberies—click HERE.

Photos courtesy of the Baublits family, taken by Joe Larin.

Click on images to enlarge.

Long Logs coming through Eatonville, 1960

Long Logs, March 1960
Long Logs, March 1960

This load of logs came down Mashell Ave. in March, 1960. In fact, the truck is stopped at the corner of Center Street and Mashell.

I can’t tell by the image what logging outfit this was. If you have some information, please share.

There has always been a need for straight, long logs, which are used for masts for sailboats, and the like. In fact, there is still a mill in Aberdeen, Grays Harbor Historical Seaport, that mills these logs for boats and flag poles. Hollywood hired the mill not long ago to create the masts for Pirates of the the Caribbean.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family, and taken by Joe Larin. 

Click on image to enlarge. 

Downtown Eatonville Photos from 1947-48 – Taken with Donald Duck Camera

On Mashell, ca. 1947-48
On Mashell, ca. 1947-48

I know these shots taken on Mashell Ave. are small, but that’s because they were taken by Dick Logston in 1947-48 on a Donald Duck camera he received for Christmas.

Here’s what he has to say, “I think the boy one the bike is myself, but not 100 percent sure. The other two were taken across the street in front of the old theater which was a church at the time. You can see the side of the old Redmen’s Hall.”

Donald Duck Camera
Donald Duck Camera

Hopefully, you can help us identify some of the people, like the woman at the gate, or the significance of the car.

“It appears to have some sort of signage on the door,” says Dick.

For those of you who are curious about the Donald Duck camera, here’s some information taken from the www.historiccamera.com.

The Donald Duck camera was manufactured made by the Herbert George Company of Chicago Illinois in circa 1946. It was constructed of a rigid shock-resistant bakelite plastic with a molded built-in view finder located on the top of the camera. It was capable of capturing twelve exposures, 1 5/8 x 1 5/8 inch in size, on number 127 color or black & white roll film. It featured a fixed focus lens and simple snap shot shutter for quick shots.

This was the first camera patented by George L. Isreal in 1946. The original models were olive drab color, with later ones in black. The back featured a unique artwork of the Disney characters, Donald, Huey, Dewey and Louie. This camera model was also used for several other models including the Happi-Time, Herco 12, and Roy Rogers Jr.

Photos courtesy of Dick Logston.

Click on image to enlarge. 

Donald Duck Camera Ad
Donald Duck Camera Ad
Donald Duck Camera
Donald Duck Camera

 

Flag Pole Going Up (1914)

Eatonville Bank and Flag Pole (1914)
Eatonville Bank and Flag Pole (1914)

This 1914 image might not be completely straight or very clear, but I love everything about it, including:

• The man at the top of the flag pole (I assume it’s a flag pole), and the ladder and bike the base.
• The fountain between Hotel Snow and the Eatonville Bank.
• The New Mashell street sign.
• the bank looks almost exactly the same.
• the tower behind.
• the dirt streets.
• the Hotel Snow.

The photo is courtesy of the Haynes family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville Welding Works (ca. 1950s)

Van Eaton Welding, snow storm
Van Eaton Welding, snow storm

This building doesn’t look all that different today sitting behind Sorensen’s Auto between Mashell Ave. and Washington Ave. Back then it was known as Eatonville Welding Works and owned by Van Eaton Chevrolet.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville Welding works in a snow storm
Eatonville Welding works in a snow storm

 

Mashell Ave. ca. 1917

Mashell Ave ca 1917
Mashell Ave ca 1917

Sometimes it feels like Mashell Ave. has been photographed more than any other street in Pierce County. Here’s another shot of Mashell Ave. looking up toward the high school.

This photo was taken around 1917. Amazingly, it still looks much the same 97 years later.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Overhead view of Eatonville, 1946

Overhead view of Eatonville 1946
Overhead view of Eatonville 1946

This picture of Eatonville ran in a paper September 1, 1946.

Caption with Picture:  Eatonville, named for T. C. Van Eaton, who platted its townsite in 1888, was in early days surrounded by dense, virgin forest. Its location on the line of the old Tacoma Eastern Railroad made it one of Washington’s most important lumber-producing and log-shipping centers. The largest part of the merchantable timber has been logged, off, however, and Eatonville it today largely dependent upon agriculture for revenue and employment, although some logging and lumbering operations still continue to the present.

You can zoom in and really see the details like the school, the mill, Mashell Ave., Washington Ave. etc.

The year 1946 is an important one to my family. My grandparents bought the dairy in Ohop Valley (not pictured) from the John and Lena Malm that year.

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.