Mineral

Mineral Hotel

Mineral Hotel
Mineral Hotel

In the early 1900s, when you visited you Mineral, you could stay at the Mineral Hotel, with a spectacular view of Mineral Lake.

Photo courtesy of Corlene Iverson and Family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Front Street, Mineral (early 1900s)

Mineral, Wash. — Front Street
Mineral, Wash. — Front Street

Mineral, Wash., was a thriving little town in the early 1900s. Mineral came into being when prospectors thought they’d find gold. Alas, all they found was coal and arsenic. Luckily, there was enough wood around to support a sawmill.

This is a shot of Front Street, facing west.

Photo courtesy of the Dunlap family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Mineral Lake Inn

Mineral Hill Road
Mineral Hill Road

I’ve just been told about a great site — minerallake.com – which has lots of local pictures, like this one. This is Mineral Hill Road near the lodge. The sign above the road says “Mineral Lake Inn,” which is now know as Mineral Lake Lodge.

“The three story cedar log lodge was constructed in 1906 by Scandinavian residents of the Mineral area who were experienced old-world craftsmen. The log workmanship is outstanding. Herman and August Ahstrand and Johann Carlson built the Inn for a wealthy young investor from the east by the name of Gilfellin. He was the son of an Englishman who manufactured one of the earliest radios made, Gilfellin radios.” (Per minerallakelodge.com)

Photo is courtesy of Ollie Calvin’s family.

Click on image to enlarge.

Mineral Shingle Mill (early 1900s)

Shingle Mil in Mineral, Wash.
Shingle Mil in Mineral, Wash.

The M. R. Smith Shingle Mill in Mineral, Wash., is no longer. But if you’re ever up there fishing, you can squint and easily imagine the place a bustling timber town and logs floating lake.

“The M.R. Smith Shingle Company mill was established in 1905 and survived into the 1980s. Western cedar grows as single trees or in small grows. The mill paid a small premium for cedar logs, cut them into bolts of generally 16 inches for shakes and 24 inches for shingles.

“The bolts were then debarked and graded. Shakes could be made by hand, and when milled were smooth on one side and had a uniform thickness. Shingles were cut to a taper for three-eighth inches to a point. Shakes and shingles that were to be transported were kiln dried to reduce shipping weight.

“A properly installed cedar roof could last over 60 years. The terminology for shakes and shingles appear to have varied by time and location. (Per Upper Nisqually Valley)

Image courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on images to enlarge.

Old Growth Near Rainier

Mineral Tree
Mineral Tree

This mammoth old growth tree was probably up near Mineral, as there was a tree up that way that people came from all around to have their picture taken with. The tree was famous. Click HERE to see a postcard of one such person.

Image courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on image to enlarge. 

Malcolm’s Meat Shop (1948)

Malcom's Meat Shop
Malcom’s Meat Shop

You’re getting a glimpse of Malcolm’s Meat Shop in August 1948 (or at least that’s what the date appears to be on the calendar behind the butcher).

Olaf Malcolm was a second-generation butcher from Norway and arrived in 1918.

He homesteaded just outside Eatonville (where Rich Collins lives today) and built a slaughterhouse. The young entrepreneur opened up meat markets in Eatonville (currently the vacant building across from Tall Timber), Kapowsin, Mineral and Morton.

Photo courtesy of Rick Parnell and the Parnell family.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Mineral Basketball – 1930

Willie Madden, 1930
Willie Madden, 1930

Willie Madden was one of Mineral school’s basket ball players in 1930.

“In the 1930s college basketball was the dominant form of organized basketball. The Depression had sunk the professional American Basketball League (ABL), which had been formed in the 1920s, but it actually revived the college game, which was played mostly in gymnasiums and armories.” (enotes.com)

Image courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on image to enlarge.

Mineral’s Mill (early 1900s)

Logs being dumped into the water at Mineral, Wash.
Logs being dumped into the water at Mineral, Wash.

Here are a couple great shots of milling in Mineral, Wash., earlier in the early 1900s. You rarely get action shots, like this one of the log falling into the mill pond.

Mineral got it’s start as a mining town. Prospectors came searching for gold and found coal and arsenic, which was both unfortunately and unhealthy. The would-be gold town turned to its trees and was the home of a logging camp and sawmill, neither of which you’ll find there today. You will, however, find some great fishing.

Photos courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Milling in Mineral (early 1900s)
Milling in Mineral (early 1900s)

Click on images to enlarge.

 

National Loggers (1926 – 1928)

Westfork Logging Co. Mineral, Wash., Sept 1928
Westfork Logging Co. Mineral, Wash., Sept 1928

Here are a few incredible shots taken in the 1920s of the loggers in Mineral and National, Wash.

The first shot is of the guys at Westfork Logging Company of Mineral, Wash. The picture was taken September 1928. Looks as though safety equipment hadn’t even been invented yet.

The second picture was taken around the same time. Take a look at the size of the logs they are shipping out and the saws sprinkled throughout the crowd.

The third shot was taken in National, Wash., in 1926. You can see the steam donkey in the background.

The photos were all taken by Kinsey, a famous photographer who was able to capture the early logging scene.

Photos courtesy of the South Pierce County Historical Society.

Shipping out the logs
Shipping out the logs

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National WA Sept. 1926
National WA Sept. 1926