Mount Rainier

Mount Rainier & Lake Washington – 1903

Mount Rainier, Lake Washington,
Mount Rainier, Lake Washington,

This 1903 Mount Rainier postcard is interesting with a native american canoeing across what is a sparsely populated Lake Washington. I say this because I found another version of this postcard on the Tacoma Public Library website.

Mount Rainier from Lake Washington
Mount Rainier from Lake Washington

It looks almost identical except for the colorization and minus the native american.

Just had to also add a shot of what Lake Washington looks like today with a few mansions. Still a beautiful spot.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler, Tacoma Library, Lake Washington Cruising bloodspot.

Click on images to enlarge.

Lake Washington - 2013
Lake Washington – 2013

Nisqually Glacier (early 1900s)

Nisqually Glacier
Nisqually Glacier

The Nisqually Glacier was something to behold in the early 1900s when you traveled up to Mount Rainier. Unfortunately, it’s doesn’t quite look like that today.

The National Park Services says, “The Nisqually is one the 25 major glaciers at Mount Rainier. [It] has shown dramatic changes in dimension within the last century.”

To give you an idea of the dramatic change they are talking about, here is a image taken form the University of Washington website. It charts the glacier’s evolution over the last century. To read more, just click here.

Nisqually Glacier evolution
Nisqually Glacier evolution

Images provided by Diane Mettler and courtesy of the University of Washington.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

A glimpse of Canyada Lodge (ca. 1913)

Post Card of Canyada Lodge
Post Card of Canyada Lodge

Imagine it’s 1913. The Titanic disaster is now a year past and you’re looking forward to the fabulous year ahead. You and spouse decide to take a trip to Mount Rainier. You’ll need a place to stay, because it’s a long drive in your new Roadster and a friend told you about a place in La Grande that just opened called Canyada Lodge.

It’s quite elegant — designed by Heath and Gove and built by Pierce County Prosecuting Attorney, John L. McMurray for a staggering $92,500 [over $2 million in 2013 currency).

Arrival
You arrive and Canyada is more spectacular that you imagined, perched above the Nisqually Canyon with ten stone columns, and curved, Asian-inspired roofline. The lodge even provides car services — free air, a supply of gasoline, oil tires, tubes, and a repair shop.

Canyada Lodge dining area
Canyada Lodge dining area

Mrs. Zella R. Turner greets you. She manages the lodge and is a graduate of Pratt’s Institute in New York and an authority on dietetics. She also has “extensive” experience catering at high-class hotels on the east coast. Under her are college girls from Oregon State University, who all specialized in domestic science. You’re in good hands.

Rooms & Meals
The rates are quite affordable — $2.50 a night, or $12.00 for the week — and the rooms are ultra-modern with hot and cold water and electric heat. Although, what else would you expect with the new hydroelectric dam just a few minutes walk away.

Dinner is a bit pricey. For .75 you can get a full dinner, but you have your heart set on the Canyada’s special Chicken dinner for $1.00 ($23.00 today). You read in their brochure “Our fried ‘Chicken Dinners,’ with hot biscuits and country gravy, too well known to speak of, are a thing of pride with us.” Heck, you’ve come this far, why not splurge?

Canyada Lodge Brochure (page 3)
Canyada Lodge Brochure (page 3)

Before you dine, you walk out onto one of the two verandas overlooking the scenic Nisqually valley and get glimpse of Mount Rainier. You make your way back in to an immense living room filled with comfortable chairs and warm up in front of a crackling fireplace. You relax, listening to a guest playing piano, and look up. The Asian architecture has even made its way into the ceiling beams of Washington fir, which are trimmed with Japanese bamboo.

Book Your Rooms

Canyada Lodge being built
Canyada Lodge being built

When you get back home, you tell your friends they must stay at the Canayda. You hope they heeded your advice because in 1927 you read the lodge burned down. Owner E. J. Leak rebuilt in1931, but it wasn’t nearly as extravagant, and it too eventually burned down in 1966.

You, however, are glad you got the chance to be a guest at the original Canyada Lodge.

 

 

 

Employee Parties at Mount Rainier (1940s)

Madora and Mr. Poppajohn - Paradise Inn employee party
Madora and Mr. Poppajohn – Paradise Inn employee party

Madora Dawkins worked up at Paradise Inn up at Mount Rainier, as a waitress in the 1940s. She says back then, “They always gave us real nice employee parties”. It was a way to keep spirits up, especially when some of the employees were kids far away from home for the first time.

These parties were put on by the employees, full of skits and homemade props. In the first picture Madora is on the right in the front. The larger man in a white dress is Mr. Poppajohn.

The Lodge Crew - Nettie and Carl in the foreground (Madora's caption)
The Lodge Crew – Nettie and Carl in the foreground (Madora’s caption)

The second picture was also taken at one of the parties.

Mardora says they made sets from things they found around the place — from sheets to it appears wheelbarrows and baby buggies.

Photos courtesy of Madora Dawkins.

Click on images to enlarge.

Ohop Valley 1909

1909 Ohop Valley Postcard
1909 Ohop Valley Postcard

Ohop Valley hasn’t change a heck of a lot over the last 100 years. This postcard was sent in 1909 by “Babe” to Mrs. M. J. Edwards.

It reads . . .

Dear Mamma, I am having a fine time now. We were over to Mrs. and Mrs. O’Connell last night for supper and had a fine time. From Babe.

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

1909 Ohop Valley Postcard (back side)
1909 Ohop Valley Postcard (back side)

Ohop Valley 1948

Ohop Valley, 1948
Ohop Valley, 1948

Picked up another post card on Ebay of Ohop Valley. This one is from 1948.

As you can see from the note, S. J. was excited about seeing Mount Rainier.

“Dear Folks,

We are going to be able to see Mt. Rainier from the tower— I’m thrilled!

It’s a perfect day – we’re leaving Shelton in a few minutes to go to Hoodsport where we stay in a cabin, then go to lookout next Sat. (Unsure about this sentence.) Train trip rough – 7 hours. Late to Tacoma due to freight derailment ahead of us. Took bus to Olympia another to Shelton – arrived here 9:30 pm simply dead. All well now. Scenery grand. Will write letter. Love S. J.”

Nisqually Glacier 1912

Nisqually Glacier ca. 1912
Nisqually Glacier ca. 1912

That’s not a mountain of rock behind those individuals. It’s a mountain of ice —  the Nisqually Glacier in 1912.

“Paradise Glacier (little Nisqually Glacier) is one of the lower glaciers, starting at an elevation of only 9,000 feet. It is an interglacier, located between the Nisqually to the west and the Cowlitz to the northwest.

An 1896 map shows the Paradise Glacier about one-half mile from the Sluiskin Falls and an essy walk from Paradise. As the century progressed, the glacier retreated up the mountain, and separted into upper and lower sections. The once vast ice caves shrunk into unstable crawl spaces, and finally in 1991, the ceiling of the last cave collapsed.” (The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier)

Photo courtesy of Bill Smith.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Eatonville in the late 60s

Corner of Carter & Penn (ca. late 60s)
Corner of Carter & Penn (ca. late 60s)

You’re looking at the corner of Carter St. and Pennsylvania Ave., and, of course, Mountain Rainier on a winter day. Things haven’t changed too much since then, except that maybe the roads are in a little better condition.

Thank you Heidi Stephens for the great shot.

Click on image to enlarge.

Paradise Lodge 1939

Paradise Lodge 1939
Paradise Lodge 1939

A peak at Paradise in 1939. It was a happening place up there, with live shows on the Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Mardora Dawkins says if you check under the carpets at the Paradise Inn you’ll find a fabulous hardwood floor that was used as a dance floor. Bem Dawkins (Jess Dawkin‘s father) installed it.

Photo courtesy of Madora Dawkins.

Paradise Inn 1939
Paradise Inn 1939

Click on image to enlarge.

Paradise Cabins 1939
Paradise Cabins 1939