Ohop Valley

Steve Burwash Haying in Ohop Valley (at Kjelstad Farm)

Steve Burwash haying in Ohop Valley
Steve Burwash haying in Ohop Valley

Pretty soon farmers will be putting in their hay. This picture, taken of Steve Burwash haying on his farm (the Kjelstad farm)was taken some years back by Steve’s son Martin.

Here’s a much earlier picture of hay being brought in on the Kjelstad farm. The white-haired woman is Olava Kjelstad — Steve’s wife’s grandmother and Ohop pioneer.

Thank you Mary (Burwash) Chalberg for sharing.

Click on image to enlarge.

Kjestand family haying — Olava in the center
Kjestand family haying — Olava in the center

Road to Rainier (ca. 1917)

Mountain Highway & Ohop Valley ca. 1917 or earlier
Mountain Highway & Ohop Valley ca. 1917 or earlier

This postcard shows what I think was the Mountain Highway (Highway 7) back around 1917 or earlier. The cars would be come down the hill into Ohop Valley.

The deer an interesting addition.

The note on the back is unfortunately a sad one: Dear Brother and Family, Ben is much worse and is very helpless. We think he will never get up again and may go soon and may last several days. Your Sister Clara.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

postcard2

Louie Mettler (ca. 1920)

 

Louie Mettler Sr.
Louie Mettler Sr.

Louie Mettler had this picture taken in San Francisco, Calif., after coming over from Switzerland to find work. He was born in 1894, and was the oldest of three brothers. He came to the U.S. when he was young to make money and support his family.

The young man had no idea that he would someday buy his own farm in the Northwest, settle in Ohop Valley, and raise a family there.

I try to image the conditions that would cause a person to leave their country, family and everything they’re familiar with, to travel to a country where they can’t speak the language and set off to find a better life. I don’t know how Louie (my grandfather) did it or all the others before and after him. But I’m thankful they did!

Here’s to that pioneer spirit.

Photo courtesy of Louie Mettler Jr.

Click on image to enlarge. 

Cows and calves grazing in Ohop Valley
Cows and calves grazing in Ohop Valley

Overhead view of Eatonville, 1946

Overhead view of Eatonville 1946
Overhead view of Eatonville 1946

This picture of Eatonville ran in a paper September 1, 1946.

Caption with Picture:  Eatonville, named for T. C. Van Eaton, who platted its townsite in 1888, was in early days surrounded by dense, virgin forest. Its location on the line of the old Tacoma Eastern Railroad made it one of Washington’s most important lumber-producing and log-shipping centers. The largest part of the merchantable timber has been logged, off, however, and Eatonville it today largely dependent upon agriculture for revenue and employment, although some logging and lumbering operations still continue to the present.

You can zoom in and really see the details like the school, the mill, Mashell Ave., Washington Ave. etc.

The year 1946 is an important one to my family. My grandparents bought the dairy in Ohop Valley (not pictured) from the John and Lena Malm that year.

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge. 

Ohop Valley 1909

1909 Ohop Valley Postcard
1909 Ohop Valley Postcard

Ohop Valley hasn’t change a heck of a lot over the last 100 years. This postcard was sent in 1909 by “Babe” to Mrs. M. J. Edwards.

It reads . . .

Dear Mamma, I am having a fine time now. We were over to Mrs. and Mrs. O’Connell last night for supper and had a fine time. From Babe.

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

1909 Ohop Valley Postcard (back side)
1909 Ohop Valley Postcard (back side)

Ohop Valley 1948

Ohop Valley, 1948
Ohop Valley, 1948

Picked up another post card on Ebay of Ohop Valley. This one is from 1948.

As you can see from the note, S. J. was excited about seeing Mount Rainier.

“Dear Folks,

We are going to be able to see Mt. Rainier from the tower— I’m thrilled!

It’s a perfect day – we’re leaving Shelton in a few minutes to go to Hoodsport where we stay in a cabin, then go to lookout next Sat. (Unsure about this sentence.) Train trip rough – 7 hours. Late to Tacoma due to freight derailment ahead of us. Took bus to Olympia another to Shelton – arrived here 9:30 pm simply dead. All well now. Scenery grand. Will write letter. Love S. J.”

Ohop Valley, Then and Then

Ohop Valley, between 1907 & 1920
Ohop Valley, between 1907 & 1920

Got these two RPPCs (real photo post cards) off Ebay of Ohop Valley. They show the early farms and their development. The first one was taken been 1907-1920, then second was a little later (ca. 1930s). The trees have grown in some, and another barn went up.

The RPPCs are a great piece of history — people capturing the pieces of history with their Kodak cameras. On the backs of the cards you came sometimes tell the date based on the printing. Here’s a resource if you’re curious about any of your RPPC dates. Real Photo Guide.

Photos courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Ohop Valley, ca. 1930
Ohop Valley, ca. 1930

Click on images to enlarge.

Olga (Olden) Strickland – young girl and beyond

Olga Helen Olden as a young girl  - Ohop Valley pioneer
Olga Helen Olden as a young girl – Ohop Valley pioneer

The Oldens were some of the first pioneers of Ohop Valley — specifically Louis and Emma Olden. There were also Olden children, including Olga, her sister Hannah Olden, and brother Norman Olden. Olga Helene Olden would later became Olga Strickland.

These pictures show a girl growing up in the valley. Born around 1905 we see her as a young girl, a teenager, and then as an older woman in 1967 at the Olden farmhouse.

I remember the older Olga, who was also my babysitter from time to time in the 60s. She had a wonderful spirit and great sense of humor.

Photos curtesy of Linda Lewis.

Click on images to enlarge.

Olga Olden with the horses
Olga Olden with the horses

Olga at the farmhouse in 1967
Olga at the farmhouse in 1967

 

Canyon Road Construction – Torger Peterson and LOTS more

Man Behind the Canyon Road - Torger Peterson, center
Man Behind the Canyon Road – Torger Peterson, center

The Canyon Road (a piece of Highway 7) was quite an operation — basically chiseled (or should I say blown away with dynamite) from a cliff wall.

In the center is Ohop Valley pioneer, Torger Peterson, who was one of the men instrumental in the construction.

Take a close look at this picture. The detail is incredible.
• The glove tacked under the window
• the Notice to Workers posting
• saws and tools
• a friendly dog
• the sign of the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Co.
• wood (making for heating or cooking, as there was a cafeteria there) with a miscellaneous boot on top.

Thank you Linda Lewis for sharing.

Click on image to enlarge.