Search Results for: Mineral

Mineral Lake – logging in 1964

Mineral lake - logging 1964
Mineral lake – logging 1964

Martin Burwash writes about this collection of photos . . .

But here’s a little Milwaukee Road history I haven’t seen….the Mineral reload when it was operated by a steam donkey. These were taken with my very first camera, a Brownie Starlite…Payless 127 film in 1964. What you are seeing is indeed a steam donkey pulling logs out of Mineral Lake and loading them on Milwaukee Road cars.

The shot taken of donkey engineer at work was done by the Old Man, as you can see me sitting in the lower corner. That old engineer was so fast at swinging the boom and dropping a log on the car, I told Dad maybe he’d have a better chance at getting a good shot….and that he did. But here’s what’s cool….we don’t have to settle for this blurry crap…somewhere the Old Man [Steve Burwash] has a set of Kodachrome slides of this.

Mineral lake - logging 1964 (2)
Mineral lake – logging 1964 (2)
Martin Burwash watching the operation
Martin Burwash watching the operation at Mineral Lake. His Dad, Steve Burwash, takes the photo.

Finding them is a definite winter “must-do.”

Photos courtesy of Martin Burswash.

Click on images to enlarge.

St. Regis Logging Truck out of Mineral (1949)

St. Regis Truck out of Mineral (1949)
St. Regis Truck out of Mineral (1949)

The logs coming out of Mineral, Wash., in 1949 were giants.

The following information about this photo comes from the Tacoma Public Library:

“An unidentified driver and two St. Regis timber workers sent a load of logs on its way from Camp #2 in Mineral, Washington to the company’s paper mill in Tacoma in August of 1949.

In 1949, St. Regis was making kraft paper in six of their mills; they manufactured about 360,000 tons of kraft paper per year. Tacoma was the newest kraft paper producing mill; paper production began there January 5, 1949. St. Regis purchased a pulp mill in Tacoma in 1930; they spent years modernizing and expanding the company’s facilities. Before 1949 they had only manufactured pulp and multiwall bags at the Tacoma plant.

In 1985 the mill became Simpson Tacoma Kraft Co. when it was purchased by Simpson Paper Co. of San Francisco.”

For more images click HERE.

Click on image to enlarge.

Logs Coming out of the Forest near Mineral in 1949 (Camp #2)

Logs out of Camp #2
Logs out of Camp #2

On August 8, 1949, a St. Regis worker appears miniscule next to the huge logs loaded on railroad flatbeds for removal from the forrest. The worker is photographed at Camp #2, located in Mineral, Wash.

This information is posted on the Tacoma Public Library site:

The completion of the kraft paper mill in Tacoma, allowed St. Regis a considerable increase in the paper production industry. View of the St. Regis Paper Company’s crew at Camp #2, located in Mineral, Washington; logs have been loaded onto the train cars, and will be transported out of Mineral Forest.

Logs coming out of Mineral (1949(
Logs coming out of Mineral (1949)

For more images, just click HERE.

Courtesy of the Tacoma Public Library.

Click on image to enlarge.

Murray Logging & Timber Co., in Mineral Wash.

Murray Logging & Timber Co.
Murray Logging & Timber Co.

You need to zoom in on this shot of Murray Logging & Timber Co., out of Mineral, Wash. Look at the men in the bottom lefthand corner to get feel for how BIG these logs really are.

I believe the pictures was taken in the 1920s, but if someone has more information on it, please let me know.

The Murray family still operates their tree farm (around 65,000 acres) outside town. There is also a Murray Logging Museum in Mineral, Wash. If you get a chance, check it out.

Photo courtesy of  Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on image to enlarge.

Shingle Mill in Mineral

Shingle Mill
Shingle Mill

The text that went with this Mineral, Wash., photo read:  M. R. Smith shingle mill after one dry kiln burned. (Looking West).

For those not familiar with kilns, they are a basically an oven used to dry wood. In this case, it looks like they were lucky it didn’t spread.

Courtesy of Mineral Lake, The Gem of the Northwest Facebook page.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

First Mineral Store

First Store in Mineral
First Store in Mineral

The first store in Mineral wasn’t much to look at, but if you lived in Mineral in the early days, it was no doubt your life line. Early stores had little of everything, and in Mineral that would include a mining pan, which is on display out front.

Photo courtesy of the Jonas family and the Mineral Lake website.

Click on image to enlarge.

Mineral Hotel

Mineral Hotel
Mineral Hotel

In the early 1900s, when you visited you Mineral, you could stay at the Mineral Hotel, with a spectacular view of Mineral Lake.

Photo courtesy of Corlene Iverson and Family.

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Front Street, Mineral (early 1900s)

Mineral, Wash. — Front Street
Mineral, Wash. — Front Street

Mineral, Wash., was a thriving little town in the early 1900s. Mineral came into being when prospectors thought they’d find gold. Alas, all they found was coal and arsenic. Luckily, there was enough wood around to support a sawmill.

This is a shot of Front Street, facing west.

Photo courtesy of the Dunlap family.

Click on image to enlarge.