Month: February 2019

Kneip’s Trucking Service (cir. 1956)

These photos taken of Kneip’s Trucking don’t show Eatonville at its best, but you do get a glimpse of 1956 Mashell Ave. If you would like a little background on the business, just click HERE.

Notice to the right of the first shot is Babe’s Cafe where you can get some Pepsi and home made pie.

The next show is a full of view. You may recognize the building now. It’s the Postnet building.

The last photo is nice because you can see down Mashell, with the high school in the background. The F.O.E. (Fraternal Order of Eagles) and the Shell station are easy to spot too.

mber 3
Kneip Building looking toward the high school.

Photos courtesy of the Baublits family and late photographer Joe Larin.

Click on images to enlarge.

Alder Dam

Alder Dam Under Construction (Aug. 23, 1943)

The Alder Dam (aka La Grande Dam) was built in the 40s, replacing an earlier version. This show reads: Aug. 23, 1943, La Grande Dam, View Downstream Toward East Abutment.

This building of the dam and the creation of the reservoir had a big impact, requiring buildings to be moved, as well as the railroad track.

The building of the first dam in 1912 created the first all-electric city in La Grande, Washington.

Click on image to enlarge.

Barneey’s Motel (the 60s)

Barneey’s has recently exchanged hands again. Thought it might be a good time to post a shot of the early days — probably the early 60s based on the cars.

Matchbook cover from Barneey’s Motel and Restaurant.

Back then is was a motel and restaurant for those coming through. This old matchbook cover looks like it evolved from motel to permanent guests as well.

You can look around on this site and see how Barneey’s evolved over the years. Good luck to the new owners.

Click on images to enlarge.

Pacific National Lumber Co.

This wonderful shot of a crew at the Pacific National Lumber Co. was taken by Kinsey in the early 1900s. A few things to note:

  1. Not much safety equipment back then. No hard hats to be seen.
  2. Wonder example of an operation on a sled or skid. Look at the size of the timber.
  3. This is, I think, a steam donkey on skids, although I don’t see a stack. A steam donkey would pull the log toward it through the woods. The steam donkey would also move itself around the woods by tying off to a tree and pulling itself to forward.

It was hard work and these men put on long hours.

Click on image to enlarge.

Mt. Rainier Guides 1924

Look at these handsome guides from 1924. Pictured are (left to right) Joe Grigs, Frank Manning, Nuls Widman, Paul Moser, Heinie Fuhrer, Hans Fuhrer, Tony Bell, Tommy Hermans, Waldo Chamberlain, Wes Langlow and Bill Duggan.

This is what The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier says about guides:

Leonard Longmire set himself up as the first “professional” (paid) guide and changed a fee of $1.00 per person for the trip to the top of Camp Muir. Business wasn’t exactly booming, and by 1898 he left the Mountain to search for gold in the Klondike. That didn’t last long, and he soon was back.

John Reese employed guides at his “Camp of the Clouds” above Paradise as early as 1903. One of them was Joseph Stampfler, a very popular young guide, who from the age of 14, had lived with the Longmires. As a small boy, he had accompanied the Muir party of 1888. “Little Joe” also operated his guide service out of the tent-camp at Indian Henrys Hunting Ground from the late 1800s until 1914. His younger brother Jules also guided at various times between 1941 and 1918.

On August 14, 1909, two climbers perished in a storm. In 1911, as a result of those deaths, Park Superintendent E. S. Hall instituted an “Official Guide System” for Mount Rainier, copied after the Swiss System. Each climbing party was limited to eight persons. Four persons were authorized to act as guides, one of whom was not permitted to guide to the summit, nor across any glacier.”

By 1914, at least four guides were authorized, three to be paid $25 per trip.

Alder Camp, 1942

I don’t know much about this photo other than what is written on it — Alder Camp from Water Tank E., August 19, 1942.

I’m assuming it’s a logging camp. In the back right of the photo, you can see what I believe is the Alder school, which is no longer standing.

You might be saying, “How come I can’t see Alder Lake?” That’s because Alder Lake as we know it didn’t exist yet. It wouldn’t be until 1944 with the construction of Alder Dam that it would take shape.

If you have any information on this image, please feel free to share.

Click on image to enlarge.

Ohop Valley – 1913 and 1960s

Ohop Valley 1913 and 1960s

As you can probably tell from the posts on this blog, I’ve got a thing for Ohop Valley. It’s in no small part because I live there, my parents lived there and my grandparents moved there to farm in the 1940s.

I’m always buying postcard on Ebay. But the ones I like best are the ones that have been mailed. This works out great, because for some reason they are usually the most inexpensive.

For Ohop Valley, I like to see what people where doing back then. In this case, the writer was doing a LOT of canning. And it’s also great to confirm the date on of the photo taken.

Here are two postcards — one mailed September 29, 1913, (the same time Houdini is performing for people in a straightjacket) and one I believe is about 50 years later taken in the 1960s. Fifty years between these post cards and the valley looks amazingly the same. Kind of nice.

Photos courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.