The Native Americans

Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Clean Up – July 1966

Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 1966
Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 1966
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 1966
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 1966

Joe Larin captured this group cleaning up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church. Anyone have any names?

The Indian Henry grave monument is there today in La Grande, Wash.

This isn’t something new to Eatonville. In 2005, Eagle Scouts Zach Ingalls and Ryan Ames did another makeover. The story Is in Eatonville News, just click here. This time around there was technology used to find the sites of the other Native Americans so that crosses could memorialize them.

Mark Parton says, “The two photos from 1966 look like Tom Carlson and two Nelson boys. The lower one with three people I beleive the blond boy is Tom Carlson. The larger group looks like the two Nelson boys on the right if Im not mistaken.”

Photo courtesy of Baublits family and Dixie Walter.

Click on images to enlarge. 

Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 2005
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 2005
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 2005
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 2005

Indian Henry’s Hunting Ground (ca. 1911)

Indian Henry's Hunting Ground (ca. 1911)
Indian Henry’s Hunting Ground (ca. 1911)

Here is a postcard of Indian Henry’s Hunting Ground at Mount Rainier, from about 1911.

Here is some information from The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier:

“At Indian Henrys Hunting Ground, form 1908 to 1915, George Hall and his wife, the former Sue Longmire, had a [] tent camp. A government bulletin from 1912 listed prices at $.75 for a bed or a weekly rate of $15.00 for bed and board. You could have your freight hauled up from Longmire for $.02 per pound. This camp, known as the “Wigwam Hotel” rivaled the one a Paradise in popularity (Camp in the Clouds), however it was severn miles of hard hiking to get there. It was abandoned in 1915.”

Thank you Jeff Morrison for sharing.

Click on image to enlarge.

Indian Henrys Hunting Ground

Indian Henrys Hunting Ground
Indian Henrys Hunting Ground

Jeff Morrison says this photo is an original picture taken of Indian Henrys Hunting Ground at Mount Rainier. If you look close you can see the white tents.

Here is some information from The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier:

“At Indian Henrys Hunting Ground, form 1908 to 1915, George Hall and his wife, the former Sue Longmire, had a [] tent camp. A government bulletin from 1912 listed prices at $.75 for a bed or a weekly rate of $15.00 for bed and board. You could have your freight hauled up from Longmire for $.02 per pound. This camp, known as the “Wigwam Hotel” rivaled the one a Paradise in popularity (Camp in the Clouds), however it was severn miles of hard hiking to get there. It was abandoned in 1915.”

Photo courtesy of Jeff Morrison.

Click on image to enlarge.

Mount Rainier & Lake Washington – 1903

Mount Rainier, Lake Washington,
Mount Rainier, Lake Washington,

This 1903 Mount Rainier postcard is interesting with a native american canoeing across what is a sparsely populated Lake Washington. I say this because I found another version of this postcard on the Tacoma Public Library website.

Mount Rainier from Lake Washington
Mount Rainier from Lake Washington

It looks almost identical except for the colorization and minus the native american.

Just had to also add a shot of what Lake Washington looks like today with a few mansions. Still a beautiful spot.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler, Tacoma Library, Lake Washington Cruising bloodspot.

Click on images to enlarge.

Lake Washington - 2013
Lake Washington – 2013

Torger Wants a Road to Mount Rainier

Man Behind the Canyon Road - Torger Peterson, center
Man Behind the Canyon Road – Torger Peterson, center

Torger Peterson, a pioneer from Norway, came to Ohop Valley in 1887. He built a farm, but road building may have been a bigger passion. These are the words from his autobiography.

“After we had cleared up some land, the main thing was to get a road, and the County helped us in this way; for every day we worked gratis, they would give us $2.00 a day for the following day, and this is the way the first road was built into the Ohop Valley and beyond.

It was always a puzzle to me how Norway, a poor country, had such splendid roads, and a country as rich in natural resources as our State of Washington, could get along with such poor roads, no better than a cow trail, and it was my chief object to see if I could not interest the people in getting good roads built so that the farmers could get their product to the markets at a reasonable cost.

Robert Mc Gilvery and team building the Canyon Road
Robert Mc Gilvery and team building the Canyon Road

In October, 1888, I went in company with Indian Henry and some other Indians up to Mount Tacoma. We went on horseback through brush over logs and finally landed in what is now known as Indian Henry’s Hunting Grounds. It was a clear day and the sun was just setting when we reached the Mountain, and I will never as long as I live forget that sight; such a park surrounded with flowers of all colors and descriptions. And right then I made up my mind to do all in my power to get a road to that Mountain so that the people could see that wonderland and inhale that invigorating Mountain air.

For twenty years I attended every County Convention. At first the people thought I was crazy when I mentioned a road to Mount Tacoma, but as years went by I had more and more followers. The Commissioners all promised to help, but each time failed me, so at last I decided to run for Commissioner myself, and was elected and the road was completed.”

Pictures are of the building of the Canyon Road, ca. 1919.

Building on the Canyon Rd.
Building on the Canyon Rd.

 

4H Club Builds Indian Henry Monument (1975)

Silver Lake 4H Club 1975
Silver Lake 4H Club 1975

This articles ran in the Dispatch in 1975. It reads:

Pictured above are members of the Sliver Lake 4-H Club who last Monday began building a stone monument to Indian Henry. The grave site also was cleared of weeds and scotch broom.

The rock monument will have a plaque commemorating Indian Henry. A formal dedication will be held in August.

Club members and adults who helped are Ken Smith, Scott Summer, Tom Bewley, Debbie Bewley, Krisi Smith, Lori Weeks, Kerry Smith, Lee Isom, Janis Isom (leader), Kay Rauch (leader), Evelyn Guske (leader), Lester Smith, Fred Guske, Janette Bertram, Shelly Smith, and Jewell Nelson. Camera shy Tom Guske took off on this motorcycle as the cameraman approached. Tom was work chairman.

Photo courtesy of the Dispatch.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Indian Henry Grave

Indian Henry grave
Indian Henry grave

This photo ran April 17, 1954. The caption read:

Historic Grave: Mrs. Orville Danforth peered over a tumble-down fence at the grave of Indian Henry, a friendly guide to early Mount Rainier trailblazers. The town of Eatonville plans to move Indian Henry’s body to a new site and erect a historical marker. It is one of many projects of “Operation Bootstrap,” organized to end civic factionalism and economic uncertainty in the Pierce County community.

The grave was never moved, there is an historic marker.

You buy the original of this press photo on ebay. Just click HERE.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Eatonville and Indian Legends of Mount Rainer

Eatonville, looking down on Mashell, with Mount Rainier in the background
Eatonville, looking down on Mashell, with Mount Rainier in the background

This early shot of Eatonville shows a big of the downtown with Mount Rainier in the background.

Native American Legends
Native Americans saw mountains and male or female. It turns out that depending on the legend, Mount Rainier could be either.

“The Cowlitz had two legends . . . First, Mount Rainier (Takhoma) and Mount Adams (Pahto) were the wives of Mount St. Helens (Seuq). A terrible quarrel ensued between the wives and during the course of it, Takhoma stepped on all of Pahto’s children and killed htem. The two women turned into mountains.

“Under the next legend, Mount Rainier and Mount St. Helens were once separated by an inland sea. They had a fierce fight over who would rule the region, and hurled hot rocks at each other, shot flames form their sujmits and rained ash on the water between them. The birds finally intervened and took Rainier far inland, then peace settled on the land again.” (Per The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier.)

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click in image to enlarge.

Indiana Henry 101

Guest blogger Bob Walter provides some interesting facts on Indiana Henry.

ndian Henry, Muir, Loomis, Van Trump, Ingraham, and Booth at Camp in the Clouds, Mt. Rainier.  1888
Indian Henry, Muir, Loomis, Van Trump, Ingraham, and Booth at Camp in the Clouds, Mt. Rainier. 1888

Indian Henry was believed to be an Upper Cowlitz Indian. Born about 1825, he moved his family in the 1860’s and established a prosperous farm at Mashel Prairie, just above the site of the earlier Mashel Massacre. He had three wives, until ordered by a Tacoma judge he could have only one.

In 1883 Indian Henry guided James Longmire, P.B. Van Trump and two others to Mount Rainier (then called Tahoma). It was on this trip that Longmire discovered the hot springs that bear his name.

In 1888 Henry guided famed naturalist John Muir and six others to the mountain. These and many other adventurers stayed at Indian Henry’s home on Mashel Prairie before proceeding further up the line to the mountain.

His habit of trading with gold nuggets spawned a legend that he had a fortune in gold hidden in the hills.

Henry was a friend to T.C. Van Eaton and most of the other early pioneer settlers.

Indian Henry Gravestone, photo by Stephen B. Emerson
Indian Henry Gravestone, photo by Stephen B. Emerson

A beautiful alpine slope on the west side of the mountain is named Indian Henry’s Hunting Ground after him.

The earliest trail from Commencement Bay to the mountain is known as the Indian Henry Trail. An engraved, granite marker still stands at the corner of South 84th and Thompson Sts., marking the trail.

Indian Henry died in 1895 and is believed to be buried at the Shaker Church Indian Cemetery near his settlement.

The photo comes from Abbi Wonacott’s site, Early Eatonville, WA,  and is one of the only pictures of Indian Henry.

Kludts Hop Farm

Kludts Hops Ranch — celebrating the harvest
Kludts Hops Ranch — celebrating the harvest

I don’t know much about these photos except that they are of the Kludts Hop Farm and that hop farming was an important crop for Washington State around the turn on the 20th century.

Here’s a small post about it from HistoryLink.org. Although it speaks primarily about King County, there was a lot of hop growing going on in Pierce County as well.

Hops Grown in Western Washington become an important world crop by 1882
In the early 1880s, Western Washington becomes one of the world’s major hop growing regions after blight destroys much of the European hop crop. Hops are a bitter plant in the hemp family used to flavor beer.

In 1882, King County farmers cultivated 200 acres that yielded 300,000 pounds of hops. The crop sold for $180,000 with expenses totaling a mere $30,000. As Thomas Prosch exclaims in his “Chronological History of Seattle…,” “Never before or since were prices so high” (287-288).

Farmers rapidly converted their land into hop fields. By 1888, more than six million pounds were harvested statewide and this increased to nine million pounds by 1890. King County supplied more hops than any other county. Native Americans provided much of the labor force to pick the hops.

Kludts Hop ranch (bins full of hops)
Kludts Hop ranch (bins full of hops)

Until 1889, the hop crop was disease-free. The hop aphid first appeared around 1889, and by 1891, whole fields were infested.

At the present time (2001), Washington state is the country’s Number One producer of hops. Most are now grown in the Yakima Valley.

Photos courtesy of Sharon and Terry Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.