1905

First Eatonville School House (ca. 1905)

Eatonville's First School
Eatonville’s First School

The Eatonville School District has come a long way in the last 100+ years. This was Eatonville’s first schoolhouse. You can find it today at Glacier View Park. 

Here is some information about the little school house from Dixie Walter’s blog, written in 2006:

The following historical excerpt is from the History of Tacoma Eastern Area by Jeannette Hlavin and Pearl Engle written in 1954. “The first school was the log house built from logs and nails and on ground donated by T. C. Van Eaton. It stood across the Mashell Avenue from the present grade school building. Some of the Scandinavian settlers were “Broad axe men,” experts at hewing logs or lumber, and they hewed the material for the school house.

First School House (photo taken 2006)
First School House (photo taken 2006)

“The first teacher was Miss Alice Dodge. School was conducted only three months a year. Two other teachers taught in the log school house, Miss Hortense Oliver and Miss. P. Messinger.

“Some towns neglect their historic buildings but this cannot be said of Eatonville. The old log school house has been tenderly cared for and is often referred to sentimentally in writings and speeches of local people.

Clyde Williams says that when it was to be removed from its original location, he said to T. C. Van Eaton, who with a team of horses, was his partner on the job: “Let’s save it” and Van Eaton replied: “All right, we have plenty of room.” Accordingly, they hitched it to the horses with chains and pulled it to the spot where it now stands.

Mensik family school photo
Mensik family school photo

“Before 1912 church services were held in it.

B. W. Lyon told the Community Day audience in 1923 that when he was school superintendent here, an orphan boy was permitted to live in the old school house. He was placed in charge of the agricultural class’s poultry, and was allowed to keep what money he made from it. In this way he was enabled to complete the high school course here. His name was John Kruger and in 1923 he was head of the Agriculture Department of the Sumas public schools.

“The Fortnightly Club used the building as a club house for some years, and it is now used for the same purpose by the Girl Scouts.”

For decades the old school house stood in the area behind the present day tennis court at the high school. Eventually, through the efforts of the Dogwood Garden Club it was moved to it’s present site. The log building has been used as the Eatonville Cooperative Nursery School for thirty-one years.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family and Bob Walter.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Olga (Olden) Strickland – young girl and beyond

Olga Helen Olden as a young girl  - Ohop Valley pioneer
Olga Helen Olden as a young girl – Ohop Valley pioneer

The Oldens were some of the first pioneers of Ohop Valley — specifically Louis and Emma Olden. There were also Olden children, including Olga, her sister Hannah Olden, and brother Norman Olden. Olga Helene Olden would later became Olga Strickland.

These pictures show a girl growing up in the valley. Born around 1905 we see her as a young girl, a teenager, and then as an older woman in 1967 at the Olden farmhouse.

I remember the older Olga, who was also my babysitter from time to time in the 60s. She had a wonderful spirit and great sense of humor.

Photos curtesy of Linda Lewis.

Click on images to enlarge.

Olga Olden with the horses
Olga Olden with the horses

Olga at the farmhouse in 1967
Olga at the farmhouse in 1967

 

Mineral Shingle Mill (early 1900s)

Shingle Mil in Mineral, Wash.
Shingle Mil in Mineral, Wash.

The M. R. Smith Shingle Mill in Mineral, Wash., is no longer. But if you’re ever up there fishing, you can squint and easily imagine the place a bustling timber town and logs floating lake.

“The M.R. Smith Shingle Company mill was established in 1905 and survived into the 1980s. Western cedar grows as single trees or in small grows. The mill paid a small premium for cedar logs, cut them into bolts of generally 16 inches for shakes and 24 inches for shingles.

“The bolts were then debarked and graded. Shakes could be made by hand, and when milled were smooth on one side and had a uniform thickness. Shingles were cut to a taper for three-eighth inches to a point. Shakes and shingles that were to be transported were kiln dried to reduce shipping weight.

“A properly installed cedar roof could last over 60 years. The terminology for shakes and shingles appear to have varied by time and location. (Per Upper Nisqually Valley)

Image courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on images to enlarge.

Snow on Mashell (ca. 1905)

Mashell Ave. snow ca 1905
Mashell Ave. snow ca 1905

It the first snowfall of the season tonight, so this picture seemed fitting — Mashell Avenue around 1905 during a snow. Even a local dog was out enjoying things.

I believe the shot was taken at the intersection of Mashell and Center, looking toward where the Eatonville high school would one day stand.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Clara Jensen’s Autograph Book (early 1900s)

Clara Jensen's Album - Signed by Ross Bond
Clara Jensen's Album - Signed by Ross Bond

Here are a few pages from Clara Jensen’s autograph book. She was born January 2, 1883, and it looks like she started keeping it in her late teens and early 20s.

History of autograph books
“Traditionally they were exchanged among friends, colleagues, and classmates to fill with poems, drawings, personal messages, small pieces of verse, and other mementos. Their modern derivations include yearbooks, friendship books, and guest books.

Clara Jensen autograph Album - page dated 1902 2
Clara Jensen autograph Album - page dated 19022

“They were popular among university students from the 15th century until the mid-19th century, after which their popularity began to wane as they were gradually replaced by yearbooks. Today’s autograph books are typically found in the hands of children collecting signatures from their favorite cartoon celebrities in amusement parks.” (Wikipedia)

One of the first entries in the autograph book is a 1902 entry by R. L. Douchenty. The word “tillen” in Sweedish mean “with regard” so “gill tillen” probably mean “with best regards”.

Clara Jensen Album - with sayings from sisters Fiona and Susie
Clara Jensen Album - with sayings from sisters Fiona and Susie

The next page and the cute sayings come from Clara’s her sisters Flora Fiander and Susie Fiander, in 1905 and 1902 respectively.

Images courtesy of June Carney.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

National’s 128 foot Timber

Load of 128-foot timbers, manufactured by Pacific National Lumber Co.
Load of 128-foot timbers, manufactured by Pacific National Lumber Co.

These 128-foot timber were milled at the Pacific National Lumber Company. It’s hard to get an idea of how really large 128-foot timbers are until you see these 40 people lined up on one.

The University of Washington Library says . . .”The Pacific National Lumber Company was established ca. 1905. By 1922, it had its headquarters in Tacoma and sawmill and logging operations in National. The company apparently went out of business ca. 1942.

The town of National is on the Mount Rainier Highway 7 miles west of the Nisqually entrance to Mt. Rainier National Park in southeast Pierce County. It was a company town established by Pacific National Lumber Company. It once housed 300 people who worked for or were dependent on the sawmill and logging operation. A post office was established December 3, 1910. The sawmill and a large part of the town burned May 13, 1912, but was rebuilt. In 1940, a writer for the WPA described National as a town of small, red, boxlike cottages crowded onto crooked, planked streets and dominated by the large red sawmill.

Photo courtesy of Debbie and Gary Saint.

Click on image to enlarge.

Robert Fiander comes to town (ca. 1905)

Robert Fiander (ca. 1905)
Robert Fiander (ca. 1905)

Robert Fiander came to Pierce County in 1874 and homesteaded at Swan Lake. For the full story you can click here.

Looks like Robert came into town for something.  The three-hourse team is pretty impressive and it cant’ be stressed how important they were before the combustion engine. If your horses we’re in good shape, neither was your farm.

Photo courtesy of Terry and Sharon Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville Redmen Basketball team (1946-47)

Eatonville Redmen, 1946-47
Eatonville Redmen, 1946-47

I’m making the jump that this was the Red Men Hall’s basketball team. The appeared to do well during the 1946-47 season in the Pierce County A.A.U. Tri-County League.

The Redmen Hall sat where the Landmark’s parking lot is today.

Abbi Wonacott writes: “The Red Men Hall, built in 1905, was used by more than just the members who built it. It was a multipurpose center of sorts. Many times meetings are referred to as being held at the hall. Its primary function was to house the Improved Order of Red Men, Nisqually Tribe #81, of Eatonville.

Though by today’s standards, it appears to be a mockery, like “playing Indians.” In practice, this group of men met to uphold important values of patriotism as those who dressed, as Indians and dumped tea into the Boston Harbor. They held charity events, raised money for those in need, and sponsored a baseball team. The Red Men Hall was a two story building constructed by the dedicated membership of 150 men in 1905.”

Photo courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

Log Slip at National

Log slip & mill at National
Log slip & mill at National

The University of Washington says this photo is of the “Pacific National Lumber Company mill pond. Mill jack and Asian crew, at National”

The picture, although not the clearest, gives you a lot of detail about logging in the early part of the 20th century.

“The history of National is closely connected with that of Ashford,” says the authors of History of South Eastern Pierce County. “The coming of the railroad in 1905 was the beginning of National Logging Co. #17 and The National Sawmill started that year.

“Camp #17 was operated by the Mineral Lake Logging Company. Pacific National Lumber Company, of which Mr. Demorest was superintendent, built the sawmill. The sawmill and most of the town burned on May 13, 1912 and had to be rebuilt.

The mill had a large payroll, which made National a thriving town for many years. The sawmill was dismantled beteween 1944-1945, and Harbor Plywood Company took over the operation on April 1, 1944 on a much smaller scale.”

Photo courtesy of Debbie and Gary Saint.

Click on image to enlarge.