1911

Nisqually Canyon in 1911

Nisqually Postcard 1911Thank goodness for postcards. They give us true glimpse into the past. Here is a hand-colored postcard sent in 1911, from Montana to Wisconsin, but depicting the Nisqually Canyon.

At the bottom it reads Nisqually Canyon, Wash. from Railway.

For a little perspective, here are a few things that were taking place in 1911:
• First non-stop Paris to London flight.
William Howard Taft was president.
• The Mona Lisa was stolen at the Louvre (but was recovered two years later.)
• Eatonville passed its Chicken Ordinance.

Nisqually Canyon postcard (back)
Nisqually Canyon postcard (back)

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

Nisqually Power Plant, 1911

Nisqually Power Plant, 1911
Nisqually Power Plant, 1911

This photo of the Nisqually Power Plant from 1911 shows quite a bit of detail.

I found this information in History of Southeastern Pierce County:

“The Alder mill shut down in 1911 and burned in 1912. A good small shingle mill was set up on the Chas. Boettcher place but soon ran out of cedar. Many of the men employed by the mill moved away. About this same time, the City of Tacoma finished the LaGrande power plant and some of the Alder people found steady employment there. Also, during this same time, Mr. Wm. Montgall built a small mill on the northwest corner of the John Malm homestead and employed about two dozen men including about a dozen Japanese who lived in a bunkhouse that used to belong to the Alder Mill. Co.”

On a side note, while researching this, I ran across a 1910 Supreme Court Case, City of Tacoma v. Nisqually Power Co., regarding eminent domain. It basically gave Tacoma the right to condemn the land to create the power plant.

If you have more information about the power plant, please feel free to share.

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

Postcard to John J. Falk (1911)

Falk Postcard 1911 (front)
Falk Postcard 1911 (front)

This postcard was sent to John J. Falk back in 1911 from Sweden.

Translation: Wish you a happy and good Pentecost. I am well and of good health. Lots of greetings with this card. To you from your friend. M.A. Waiting for response.

Mr. Falk written up briefly in the town’s history:

“During April 1913 various plans for an electric light system were discussed and a survey made to determine [a] number of possible users: also possibility of [the] town procuring free fuel from the Eatonville Lumber Company for a steam power electric lighting plant. In June, the committee met with John Falk for the purpose of securing [a] site for a dam and power house on Lynch Creek for municipal light and power plant.

In July they met to consider steps in the construction of a hydro-electric light and power plant . . . Mr. Snow had secured pledges amour to $39,900 [$975,000 by today’s standards]  in a partial canvass of the town, this being based on the purchase of the site at Lynch Creek and the construction of a transmission line to LaGrande for current.

Footnote: 1954. The site was purchased and is still owned by the town, but the dam and power house were not built. The town owns and maintina its own distribution lines from LaGrande and pays the City of Tacoma for electricity used each month, the town in turn collecting from users.”   (History of Southeastern Pierce County)

Falk Postcard 1911 (back)
Falk Postcard 1911 (back)

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler. Translation by Venke Lyngsnes.

Click on images to enlarge.

Van Eaton’s General Store (ca. 1910)

T. C. Van Eaton's building, standing where Kirk's parking lot is today.
T. C. Van Eaton’s building, standing where Kirk’s parking lot sits today.

T.C. Van Eaton built the first general store — where Kirk’s Pharmacy stands today — and in 1912 sold it to A. Y. Lindsey Co. 

This appears to be the back half of the store, and T.C. Van Eaton in the center, wearing the dark suit and hat.

A.Y. Lindsey Co., Marshell Ave. (early 1900s)
A.Y. Lindsey Co., Marshell Ave. (early 1900s)

Per Pat Van Eaton, the boy in the chair is John Van Eaton. The man in the doorway is Charlie Williams and his nephew. The pictures was taken around 1914, making John Van Eaton (born 1911) about 3 years old.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

 

Aug. Suderburg Gen. Msde.

Aug. Suderburg Store - Alder
Aug. Suderburg Store - Alder

This is a wonderful shot of the Aug. Suderburg store in Alder around 1930. (If you’d like to look inside, just click HERE.)

The advertising on the front and side is nearly as interesting as the shot. Like the Washington company, Fisher’s Blend Flour, which opened for business June 1, 1911 on Harbor Island in Elliott Bay.

“In 1926, the Fishers founded a radio station (KOMO) and went on the air in part to advertise Fisher’s Blend Flour. Another famous product was Fisher Scones, purveyed at fairs and festivals throughout the Northwest. The president of the Puyallup Fair, William Paulhamus, discovered the triangular shaped scones in 1915 at the Panama Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. He debuted the scones at the Puyallup Fair the same year.” (per HistoryLink.org)

 About the Suderburgs
August Suderburg had a farm on Hedborg road, about a mile north the Alder. He had two sons — Elmer and Theodore (Ted).  Elmer was born on the farm, eventually working the farm and then inheriting it. For a little while Elmer also operated the Suderberg store. He and his wife Minnie lived on the farm their entire lives.
Elmer & Minnie Suderburg, Alder, December 24, 1926
Elmer & Minnie Suderburg, Alder, December 24, 1926

Ted and his family owned a grocery and general store just below the new school ground in the middle of the town. They also had a small warehouse across the highway from the sore and adjacent to the Alder railroad siding. (Per Old Alder) Photos courtesy of Carl Linden. Click on images to enlarge.

Photos courtesy of Carl Linden.

Click on images to enlarge.

Eatonville’s Train Depot

Train Depot on Madison
Train Depot on Madison

Trains used to roll through Eatonville daily. In fact, ” . . . in 1913, the railroad had three passenger trains a day going through Eatonville, with observation cars. The tourist special was taken off in September, 1924, competition from busses and automobiles having interfered. The railroad also carried the mail until July 1, 1928.” (History of South Eastern Pierce County.)  If you were catching the train, the depot was on Madison, off Center street.

Madison Street
Madison Street

One of the great things about this shot are the roaming chickens. Between 1911 and 1913 Eatonville passed, repealed and passed an ordinance curtailing chickens from “running at large”. Chickens at the time of this shot were still on the loose.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

N.P. Christensen and Maren Pederson (early settlers)

Anton Jensen and Family & NP Christensen and family, August 1917, Mud Lake
Anton Jensen and Family & NP Christensen and family, August 1917, Mud Lake

Guest blogger Bob Walter gives us some background on Eatonville’s early settlers, Pete and Maren Christensen.

N.P. (Nels “Pete”) Christensen and Maren Pedersen, both born in Denmark, met in the United States and were married in Neenah, Wisconsin in 1889. Awhile after reaching Tacoma in 1890, they walked all the way to Ohop Lake, N.P. carrying their baby, Katie, in his arms. They settled there but found they were on railroad land, so had to relocate; they moved several times before buying property in the town of Eatonville, where they remained. They raised five children, Katie, Anne (Haynes), Henry, Edward and Dan.

In 1912 Mr. Christensen bought the fledgling Mashell Telephone Company from Dye and Biggs; the Christensen family and descendents have been primary owners of the communications company ever since. It is now called Rainier Connect. There were about 30 telephones in Eatonville when he purchased the two-year-old company.

Maren Christensen
Maren Christensen

Pete Christensen was a key figure in the early days of Eatonville Schools, building the first school building with a furnace in it, then building another of the exact same design when the first one burned down barely a year after it was built. Pete was also a member of the school board that hired B.W. Lyon.

They were determined to have a school system second to none. Pete was on the school board from 1911 to 1917, and was re-elected to the board in 1936. He was a volunteer fireman and was part of the team pulling the hose cart to fires in 1920, at around 50 years of age.

Pete liked to drink one shot of whiskey each evening and smoke on his cigar. Maren sent him outside for that ritual.

G. B. Ingersoll Keeps Eatonville in Hardware (1911)

G. B. Ingersoll Ad (1911)
G. B. Ingersoll Ad (1911)

G. B. Ingersoll was the Arrow Lumber of his day. In this 1911 ad that ran in the Eatonville High School Catalogue, he covers it call hardward, furniture, stoves, ranges and building materials.

He was involved in town business — attended the county convention, held office of Town Treasurer and more.

Unfortunately, Ingersoll experienced a major set back a few years later. In 1915, someone inadvertently set his store on fire, setting off what is considered Eatonville’s worst fire.

Eatonville Blaze of 1915
Eatonville Blaze of 1915

Image courtesy of Rich Williams and Gary Henrickson.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Receive for Fire Alarm Bell

T. C. Van Eaton, Ingersoll receipt (1911)
T. C. Van Eaton, Ingersoll receipt (1911)

This 1911 receipt for $3.00 to T. C. Van Eaton from the town Treasurer, G. B. Ingersoll, was for money towards the Eatonville fire alarm bell. The bell cost $31.50 and was used to warn townspeople for decades.

“In 1912, the auto stage replaced the horse drawn state lines, although the Eatovnille fire fighters continued to use a horse cart propelled by man-power for almost 20 more years.” (History of Southeastern Pierce County.)

Eatonville Firehouse 1942
Eatonville Firehouse 1942

Image courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.