1923

Eatonville Lumber Company facts

Eatonvlle Lbr Co yarder
Eatonvlle Lbr Co yarder

Here are a few things you might know about the Eatonville Lumber Company, which operated in Eatonville from 1907 until 1954.

• Tacoma Eastern/Chicago Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad arrived in 1904 — followed by the opening of the mill in 1907.
T. S. Galbraith (Tom) took over ELCO in the fall of 1909.
John Galbraith (Tom’s son) took over from his dad in 1930. He was also mayor of Eatonville for 22 years and chairman of the school board for numerous terms.
• The mill employed 200 employees at its height.
• Wages in 1912 – $.17/hr., and an employee worked six, eight-hour days a week.
• Wages in 1952 – $1.85/hr., and employees worked five, eight-hour days a week.
ELCO store was built in 1908
• ELCO office was built in 1910
• ELCO station and auto repair shop was built in 1907
T. S. Galbraith built his home in 1925 and it’s still used today.

Overview of ELCO 1942
Overview of ELCO 1942

• T. S. Galbraith built 22 company-owned homes. Most were built in 1910 and were located next to the company store, and some are still family homes.
• The houses on Prospect Street were built in 1913 and the houses on Washington street were built in 1923.
• The mill burned in 1932 and was rebuilt over a number of years. It finally reopened September 22, 1936.
• Galbraith sold the mill to G. E. Karlen in 1941.

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton, the Parnel family and the University of Washington. Facts courtesy of The Eatonville History Project.

Click on images to enlarge.

Morgan and Ray Williams (ca. 1910)

Morgan Williams & Ray Williams
Morgan Williams & Ray Williams

These two little kids are Morgan and Ray Williams.

Ray was the son of Charley Williams, who owned the Pioneer Garage — known today at the Tall Timber Restaurant. Ray graduated from Eatonville High School in 1923 and was quite the athlete. He was on the incredible basketball team that went to Chicago and was also a state champion in track, competing in the 880, broad jump and high jump.

Photo and information courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

Ray Williams, Basket ball player 1923
Ray Williams, Basket ball player 1923

Fleet of Kelly Springfield Trucks (ca. 1923)

Griffith & Graeber's fleet of Kelly Trucks, early 20s
Griffith & Graeber's fleet of Kelly Trucks, early 20s

Fabulous shot of a fleet of Kelly Springfield Trucks operated by Griffith & Greaber logging out of Eatonville.

This photo is worth clicking on to enlarge to see the incredible detail. The trucks look pretty primitive compared to the trucks of today, but look at the size of the logs they’re hauling.

Courtesy the Jack Graeber family.

Click on images to enlarge.

The Super Fans of the 1923 Basketball Team

Coach Davis, Dolphie Hekel, Arthur Duke, Donovan Matheny, Irving Elmlund, Lloyd James, Dan Christensen, Ray Williams and Clarence Halverson, Richard King, Arthur Swanson
Coach Davis, Dolphie Hekel, Arthur Duke, Donovan Matheny, Irving Elmlund, Lloyd James, Dan Christensen, Ray Williams and Clarence Halverson, Richard King, Arthur Swanson

A lot happened in Eatonville in 1923. Nine loggers died and two were injured, a number of homes were raided in April searching for moonshine and Malcolm’s Meat Market completed a $10,000 addition to its meat packing plant (about a $127,000 investment today). But all this paled next to the EHS basketball team’s journey to the national tournament.

The game
In 1923 Eatonville was considered to have the best basketball team in the state. The winner at state would be invited to Chicago to play in the national tournament and the town rooted their players on all season.

It came down to Walla Walla and Eatonville at state. At the end of the game, the score was tied and the teams went into overtime. At the end of the second overtime Eatonville lead by one point. Then the unthinkable happened — an Eatonville player fouled a Walla Walla player with no time left. The officials, however, said the foul occurred before the time had run out.

The crowd, as you can imagine, went nuts. But once everyone settled down, the Walla Walla player sank his two foul shots and Walla Walla won by one point; 20 to 19. The Eatonville team and fans went home defeated — there would be no trip to Chicago.

Eatonville Fight Songs — which you probably would have been singing if you were one of the 1923 Super Fans!
Eatonville Fight Songs — which you probably would have been singing if you were one of the 1923 Super Fans!

Super Fans
To everyone’s surprise, a few days later the University of Chicago invited two teams from Washington — Walla Walla and Eatonville (based on its remarkable record that year).  Eatonville, big on team spirit, got busy raising money to send its boys back east.

• The Eatonville businessmen and people in the community raised $1,800.
• T. S. Galbraith, who owned the mill, donated $200.
• Business owner N. C. Christensen donated $100.
• The Puyallup Elks donated $50.
• The Eatonville Masons donated $50.
• The kindergarten class chipped in .38, and
• A small boy donated the pennies he’d been saving for a baseball glove.

When it was all said and done, the town had raised about $2,200 — approximately $28,866 today.

In Chicago, Eatonville lost to the Fitchberg Mass., team in the first round, 27 to 22. Considering Eatonville was the smallest town in the U.S. to be invited and Fitchberg was one of the largest, it was a good showing and the 1923 team would be long remembered.

Eatonville’s team spirit would also be legendary. Later that year, Olaf Malcom (Keith Malcom’s father) took a business trip to Portland. When people learned he was from Eatonville they knew all about “the place where the folks are on their toes and had real boosters.”

1923 Winning Basketball team
Coach Davis, Dolphie Hekel, Arthur Duke, Donovan Matheny, Irving Elmlund, Lloyd James, Dan Christensen, Ray Williams and Clarence Halverson, Richard King, Arthur Swanson

Photo courtesy of Rich Williams

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Fleet of Kelly Logging Trucks

Griffith & Graeber truck
Griffith & Graeber truck

Trees haven’t changed much, but the logging trucks sure have.

Pictured are Kelly Trucks  trucks owned by Griffith & Graeber logging out of Eatonville. In this first photo you can make out Goodyear on the tire.

The shots were taken around 1923.

Courtesy the Jack Graeber family.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Fleet of Griffith & Graeber's  Kelly trucks
Fleet of Griffith & Graeber's Kelly trucks

Henry and Mathilda Hedborg

Henry and Matilda (Anderson) Hedberg
Mathilda (Anderson) Hedborg and Henry Hedborg

Axel Henry and Mathilda (Anderson) Hedborg were early homesteaders in Alder — you could say they blazed the trail. (They were members of the Pioneer Association of 1928. To be on this roster you had come to the area before 1903.)

In 1889, Henry bought 160 acres about 3 miles outside Alder. He had to clear the land to make space to build a log cabin.  His farm prospered and in 1923 he purchased another 160 acres and Hedborg’s farm was considered one best around.

They had 4 children — Curtis, Helen, Sadie and Ida. You may see Ida’s name come up again. She taught school in Eatonville for  a number of years.

Photo courtesy of Linda Lewis.

Click on image to enlarge.

Logging Deaths Mount in 1923

A.W. Bridge Hospital, 1920, located across the street from High School on Mashell Ave.
A.W. Bridge Hospital, 1920, located across the street from High School on Mashell Ave.

1923 was a dangerous year in the woods if you were in Eatonville.

There were nine deaths and two serious injuries to Eatonville loggers. There could have been more, but those were the ones reported at the Eatonville hospitals.

Here are are few of the grizzly details:

• Dan Crabill was crushed to death in May when a load of logs pulled by runaway horses swerved as they crossed the state road.

• John Kalafatich, a bucker working for Eatonville Lumber Company,was killed instantly when a larger tree, hit a smaller tree, which struck him.

• Irvin Kendall was knocked 15 feet and broke his neck when a tree hit the tree he was felling.

* Paul Woock of Ashford and Harry Howell were killed in September. It’s believed they were cutting down a tree and got in line with the haul-back line.

• William J. Howden lost his life when logs rolled off a car.

• Yotaro Sakai was killed by a car that broke loosed and shot down a steep hill.

• Norman Evert, Carol Lobinger and a Japanese man, all working for Pacific National Lumber Company, were instantly killed (one man seriously injured) when a cylinder head was blown out of a donkey engine.

Eatonville Hospital
The only saving grace was that Eatonville did have medical facilities. This picture was taken in 1920 outside the hospital (now a residence on the corner across from the Eatonville High School). Dr. A. W. Bridge, I believe is the man on the far left.

Photo courtesy of Hendrickson Family and Abbi Wonacott.

Click on image to enlarge.

EHS Girls Basketball 1923

Girls 1923 basketball team
Girls 1923 basketball team

It’s not the best picture of the EHS 1923 girls basketball team, but you’ve got to love the uniforms.

1923 was an interesting year in history of women’s basketball.

The Women’s Division of the National Amateur Athletic Federation (WDNAAF) held its first conference. Over the next few years it tried to ban women’s extramural basket ball games and other sports from high schools, industrial leagues and  churches, because they were too competitive.

However, the following year, the Olympics added women’s basketball as an exhibition event.

Support Eatonville History at 2011 Art Festival

Mr. C.A. Stahlberg, Manual Training Tacher in front of the a 1920 GMC School Bus, 1923
Mr. C.A. Stahlberg, Manual Training Tacher in front of a 1920 GMC School Bus, 1923

Just wanted to let everyone know that this weekend at the Eatonville Art Festival there are two history booths.

Eatonville Historical Society
At the Eatonville Historical Society booth you will find:
• lots of artifacts
• books to buy written by local authors Abbi Wonacott and Donald Johnstone
• membership applications, and
• someone to answer any questions — like me if you’re there Saturday morning.

The Eatonville Project
At the far end of the Art festival will be the Eatonville Project booth, that is raising money to produce “You are Here” historical materials for Eatonville School District students. They have calendars and postcards for sale, like this one. (Which, by the way, were created by Chris Bivins.)

Come on down and look around, and if you’re in the mood, support your local history groups!

 

The fabulous 1923 EHS Basketball Team

1923 Winning Basketball team — D. Hakel, A.E. Duke, D. Matheny, E. Elmlund, L. James, D. Christensen, R. Williams and C. Halverson
1923 Winning Basketball team — D. Hakel, A.E. Duke, D. Matheny, E. Elmlund, L. James, D. Christensen, R. Williams and C. Halverson

 

 

Guest blogger today is Rich Williams describing the winning 1923 EHS Basketball game.

In 1923 Eatonville was considered the best team in the State. They only lost one game during the season and that was to The University of Washington freshman team.

Game Goes into Overtime
At the State tournament Eatonville faced Walla Walla in the semi-finals. At the end of regulation the score was tied.

In the first overtime, Eatonville was leading until Walla Walla sunk a shot with seconds to go to tie the game again.

In the second overtime, Eatonville was leading by one point with only seconds to play. An Eatonville player fouled one of the Walla Walla players with no time left, but the officials said the foul occurred before the time ran out.

1923 BB players, Dolphie Hekel, Donovan Matheny & Irving Elmlund
1923 BB players, Dolphie Hekel, Donovan Matheny & Irving Elmlund

The crowd went nuts. Everyone thought Eatonville had won. Once everyone settled down, the Walla Walla player sank two foul shots and Walla Walla won by one point; 20 to 19.

After the tournament, Hekel, Elmlund and Matheny were awarded first string all-state honors.

Season wasn’t over
The winner of the 1923  State Tournament was to be  invited to the Chicago National Basketball Tournament. Since it  was Walla Walla that would go, Eatonville thought their season was over. However, a few days later, Eatonville was notified that the University of Chicago was inviting two teams from Washington State; Walla Walla and Eatonville.

Eatonville was the smallest town in the U.S.  to be invited to the Chicago Tournament. They were matched against one of the biggest schools — Fitchberg, Massachusetts in the first round. Eatonville played a very sound game but went cold in the last quarter.  Fitchberg won the game 27 to 22.

1923 BB players, Dolphie Hekel, Donovan Matheny & Irving Elmlund
1923 BB players, Dolphie Hekel, Donovan Matheny & Irving Elmlund

Many years later, Dave Predmore (EHS  Class of 1962) talked  to Ick Elmlund about this game. Ick told Dave the gym back in Chicago had glass backboards (very unusual at that time) and the team had a hard time adjusting to them. It wasn’t an excuse for losing but anyone who has played basketball knows that the ball reacts differently with glass boards. Especially when most players back then used a bank shot.

Photos courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1923 EHS BB players, Dan Christensen, Ray Williams, Richard King, Arthur Swanson
1923 EHS BB players, Dan Christensen, Ray Williams, Richard King, Arthur Swanson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1923 BB Coach Davis
1923 BB Coach Davis