1926

The Dr. Bridge Clinics and Hospitals (1910-1930)

Dentist David Cook, third from the right, in front of the Bridge Hospital in Eatonville
Dentist David Cook, third from the right, in front of the Bridge Hospital in Eatonville

This excerpt is taken from a Dr. A. W. Bridge biography, written by Karen Swanson. She collected information about Dr. Bridge from many of the “old timers” of Eatonville, Wash.

Clinics and Hospitals
In National it was called the Bridge Clinic. Dr. Smith would take care of all of the first aid cases he could connected with the mill or anything else. When things came to a point where he couldn’t handle them, he’d send for Dr. Bridge. Especially in hospital cases, since Dr. Bridge handed the contract cases. He had doctors and clinics also in Kapowsin, Mineral, Ashford and Morton. In 1926, he also opened the Bridge Clinic in Tacoma specializing in surgery. Later, he expanded to Seattle and Raymond.
A nurse, Mary Bridge and her son Dr. Bridge in clinic across from High School
A nurse, Mary Bridge and her son Dr. Bridge in clinic across from High School

Then in 1930, he moved his headquarters to Tacoma. He maintained a doctor in Eatonville, but closed the hospital there as the good roads and ambulance services made it practical for the people of his hometown community to use the Bridge Hospital in Tacoma.

Doctors in charge of the Eatonville offices after Dr. Bridge left were in turn: Dr. Wiseman, Dr. I. J. Glovatsky, Dr. G. A. Delaney, (note, names were hard to read and I may not have them entirely correct) and finally Dr. Nevitt who took over the practice when Dr. Bridge died and built a handsome clinic in Eatonville of his own.  The hospital between Raymond and South Bend was called the River View Hospital. There was also a clinic in Selleck. Others were in Bremerton, Rainier, Olympia, Castle Rock and Puyallup. With Dr. Bridge starting all of these clinics, needless to say, Eatonville became kind of a medical center for southern Pierce County. Of course, there was the Eatonville Clinic above the drug store.
A. W. Bridge X-ray facility
A. W. Bridge X-ray facility

Dr. Brdige sent his patients to the Eatonville Hospital, and later when he built the hospital in Tacoma, that’s where they went. Then he had a section in St. Joseph’s Hospital, before he built his own clinic. Then when he wanted to build his own clinic, he had a terrible time trying to raise funds for it. First there would would be one organization that would be a group of Catholics, then there would be another organization interested in St. Joseph’s or Tacoma General Hospital. Finally, one of his best friends, Tom Galbraith gave him a boost. They were going to build the Medical Arts Building in Tacoma and they wanted Dr. Bridge to go in there, but he wanted a certain amount of floor space. For the amount of money he would have to spend, he decided he could build his own building.

Another problem that he ad was that there were lots of people interested in the Medical Arts Building. He did have a hospital between Raymond and South Bend, the Riverview Hospital. He bought it (unclear next three words) after he built the Bridge clinic in Tacoma. Martin Killian could remember taking an old broken (?) down walk-in refrigerator down there and setting it up in the basement. Later, Dr. Bridge moved to Tacoma and had his offices in the Fidelity Building.
The Fidelity Trust Building, located at 949-55 Broadway, was built in 1890 and demolished in 1949.
The Fidelity Trust Building, located at 949-55 Broadway, was built in 1890 and demolished in 1949.

T. C. Van Eaton owned a building on the corner, but for some reason, Dr. Bridge couldn’t buy that. You see, he wanted to be on a street corner because he was very conscious of fire. What he wanted was where there would be a vacant lot on one side and on the other side he would put up a big tin wall in back of the hospital. He put fire-proof doors on the windows on the south side. Again I stress, he was very conscious of fire. Sander Hutchinson was Dr. Bridge’s business manager in the days when he was expanding. He wasn’t a lawyer, but he was described as being a dar good promotor.

1924 – A. W. Bridge’s X-ray Facility

A. W. Bridge X-ray facility
A. W. Bridge X-ray facility

This photo comes from the Tacoma Public Library Archives.

The caption reads: “These are believed to be medical facilities used by Dr. Albert W. Bridge, pioneer Tacoma and Eatonville physician and surgeon, in 1924. This equipment was most likely used in taking X-rays. Dr. Bridge had an office in the Fidelity Building in downtown Tacoma and resided at the University Club. He would later help endow a new hospital dedicated to the service of children to be named after his mother, Mary Bridge.”

Click on image to enlarge.

Big Smile by Hazel Joy Williams (ca. 1920)

Hazel Joy Williams up front
Front: Hazel Joy Williams — Middle: Cecil Williams, Fern Fenton, Fay Williams — Back: Charley Williams, Bill Oxley, Clyde Williams

This may be the cutest picture posted to-date. Just zoom in and tell me you don’t smile.

Rich Williams provides wonderful background on everyone.

“In the front row making the funny face is my father’s (Cecil Williams) youngest sister Hazel Joy Williams. Joy, as she went by, married Cliff Pratt August 3, 1936 and lived most of her life in Gig Harbor.  She taught school at Rosedale Elementary for 36 years. Joy and Cliff had three children; Tom, Joan and Don, who all attended Rosedale Elementary School . While in Joy’s classroom, there was one stipulation — they were never to call her mother during class.  Joy died in 2002 at the age of 90.

“The boy on the left in the middle row is my father Cecil Williams. Dad married my mother Ruth Anderson in 1935 and worked at Eatonville Lumber Company before and after World War II. During the war, he served in the Navy Seabee’s. He was stationed in the Allusion Islands and later on Tinian  in the Mariana Islands. After the war, he had his own electrical business plus he managed the Town of Eatonville electrical department. My folks lived at Clear lake for over 50 years and  Dad passed away in 2003 at the age of 92.

“Center, middle row, is my dad’s cousin, Fern Fenton. Her father, George Fenton, married my grandmother’s sister Merl Duncan. George and my grandfather were best friends.”

“Center right, disgusted with her sister’s antics,  is my father’s older sister Fay Williams. Fay graduated from Eatonville High School in 1926 and was Eatonville’s first May Day Queen. She later married Art Duke. The Duke family homesteaded in the Alder area in the 1890’s.  Art and Fay had two children, Jim and Arlene. Fay worked at Rhodes Department Store for many years and passed away in 2003 at the age of 94.

“In the back row on the left is my grandfather’s older brother Charley Williams. Charley owned and operated the Pioneer Garage in Eatonville.  The building is now the Tall Timber Restaurant.

“Back row, center is a family friend named Bill Oxley.”

“On the right, back row, is my grandfather Clyde Williams. Clyde married Hettie Duncan in 1907. Clyde was a shingle weaver for over thirty years. He worked at Eatonville Lumber Company until the shingle mill closed down then worked at the shingle mill in Mineral until the late 50’s. He retired and lived in Eatonville until 1971. He was determined to be around when Ruthie and I got married August 15, 1971. He died one week later.”

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

1926 Cruiser Becomes Eatonville Mascot

Cruise Team 1928-29
Cruise Team 1928-29

In 1926 — the same year that Winnie the Pooh was published and the first Pontiac was built — Eatonville made the Cruiser their official mascot. A timber cruiser goes out an examines a stand of timber to determine it’s potential value. This might be kind of an obscure mascot, but a perfect choice for the little logging town.

I’m not entirely sure what sport these newly-named Cruisers played, but they were Puget Sound champions in 1928-29.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

Cecil Williams and Otto Haynes with their Dogs

Cecil Williams and his dog
Cecil Williams and his dog

Photos of Eatonville’s past are filled with people and and their dogs. Here are two shots of boys with their dogs — Cecil Williams and Arne O. Haynes and his dog Jiggs Jr.

If you’ve got a picture of an Eatonville-ite and their dog, please share.

Photos courtesy of the Haynes family and Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

Otto Haynes and his dog
Arne O. Haynes and his dog – 1926

Pacific National & Westfork Timber – 1926 & 1928

Westfork Logging co, Mineral WA  Sept 1928
Westfork Logging co, Mineral WA Sept 1928

These shots of Pacific National Lumber Co., out of National, Wash., abnd Westfork Timber, out of Mineral, Wash., were taken by renowned photographer Kinsey in 1926 and 1928. He (and his brother) were able to catch the loggers, the forests  and the logger’s life like no other photographer.

Pacific National Lumber Co., is no longer, but Westfork is still around.

If you would like to see a movie of Westfork Logging back in the 1930s, just click HERE.

Photos courtesy of the South Pierce County Historical Society.

Pac National Lumber co., National, Wash., Sept 1926
Pac National Lumber co., National, Wash., Sept 1926

Click on images to enlarge.

Aug. Suderburg Gen. Msde.

Aug. Suderburg Store - Alder
Aug. Suderburg Store - Alder

This is a wonderful shot of the Aug. Suderburg store in Alder around 1930. (If you’d like to look inside, just click HERE.)

The advertising on the front and side is nearly as interesting as the shot. Like the Washington company, Fisher’s Blend Flour, which opened for business June 1, 1911 on Harbor Island in Elliott Bay.

“In 1926, the Fishers founded a radio station (KOMO) and went on the air in part to advertise Fisher’s Blend Flour. Another famous product was Fisher Scones, purveyed at fairs and festivals throughout the Northwest. The president of the Puyallup Fair, William Paulhamus, discovered the triangular shaped scones in 1915 at the Panama Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. He debuted the scones at the Puyallup Fair the same year.” (per HistoryLink.org)

 About the Suderburgs
August Suderburg had a farm on Hedborg road, about a mile north the Alder. He had two sons — Elmer and Theodore (Ted).  Elmer was born on the farm, eventually working the farm and then inheriting it. For a little while Elmer also operated the Suderberg store. He and his wife Minnie lived on the farm their entire lives.
Elmer & Minnie Suderburg, Alder, December 24, 1926
Elmer & Minnie Suderburg, Alder, December 24, 1926

Ted and his family owned a grocery and general store just below the new school ground in the middle of the town. They also had a small warehouse across the highway from the sore and adjacent to the Alder railroad siding. (Per Old Alder) Photos courtesy of Carl Linden. Click on images to enlarge.

Photos courtesy of Carl Linden.

Click on images to enlarge.

EHS Sophomore Class 1926-27

EHS Sophomore class, 1926-27
EHS Sophomore class, 1926-27

With school back in session for the 2012-2013 year, it’s fun to look back the classes than went before.

Here’s a shot of the sophomore class of 26-27, who stood on the high school steps 86 years ago. You may recognize a few names.

Front Row: George Case, Elizabeth Case, Jessie Swanson, Marguerite Christensen, Leonard Wright
Second Row: Hugh Beckett – Teacher Adviser, Grace Monohan, Elsie Boyles, Venetta Lund, Agnes Mensik, Berniece Asplund, Margaret Griffith Third Row: Dave Benston, Marvin Brock, Carl Langberg, Ross LeMaster, Mike Schutsky
Fourth Row: Edison Rathbone, Elmer Schnell, Carl Bernent, Phillip Carlson, Orville Smith, Fred Brown

Photo courtesy of Smith family.

Class names - EHS Sophomore, 1926-27
Class names - EHS Sophomore, 1926-27

Click on image to enlarge.