1926

EHS Class of 1926

EHS Class of 1926
EHS Class of 1926

This is a nice shot of the EHS Class of 1926. Their motto was “Quality, not Quantity”. (Thank you too to the person that wrote down all the names!)

First Row: Harold Westby, Fay Williams, Nell Nightengale, Hazel Wallace, Verora Rathbone, William Smith, Fred Boyles.

Second Row: Arthur Semple, Agnes Duffy, Mary Leeper, Aldea Jacobson, Edith Berg, Ivan Swanson, Nels Yefldt

Third Row: Morgan Williams, Kenneth Burgess, Doris Hecht, Miss Lillian Larson, Worthy Hecht

Photo courtesy of the Taylor and King families.

Names and Motto - Class of 1926
Names and Motto - Class of 1926

Click on images to enlarge.

Logging in National (1926)

Steep incline, Pacific National Lumber Co.
Steep incline, Pacific National Lumber Co.

These shots of the Pacific National Lumber Company were taken in National, Wash., August 1926 by C. Kinsey of in 1926.

The first is an extremely steep incline, with tracks running at least half the way up. If you zoom in you can see the cables hanging from the poles and the well-used transport cars at the bottom of the hill.

The second shot was also taken of the Pacific National Lumber Co., in National, in September of the same year, capturing the steam donkey and crew. Take a look at the enormous timbers the men are sitting on.

Although the technology and steep-slope logging techniques have changed over last 86 years, it looks like logging suspenders have stayed in fashion.

Photos courtesy of the South Pierce County Historical Society.

Click on images to enlarge.

Pacific National Lumber Co, National, WA  1926
Pacific National Lumber Co, National, WA 1926

National Loggers (1926 – 1928)

Westfork Logging Co. Mineral, Wash., Sept 1928
Westfork Logging Co. Mineral, Wash., Sept 1928

Here are a few incredible shots taken in the 1920s of the loggers in Mineral and National, Wash.

The first shot is of the guys at Westfork Logging Company of Mineral, Wash. The picture was taken September 1928. Looks as though safety equipment hadn’t even been invented yet.

The second picture was taken around the same time. Take a look at the size of the logs they are shipping out and the saws sprinkled throughout the crowd.

The third shot was taken in National, Wash., in 1926. You can see the steam donkey in the background.

The photos were all taken by Kinsey, a famous photographer who was able to capture the early logging scene.

Photos courtesy of the South Pierce County Historical Society.

Shipping out the logs
Shipping out the logs

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National WA Sept. 1926
National WA Sept. 1926

Community Day (aka May Day)

Mashell Ave ca 1916
Mashell Ave. ca 1916

Growing up, I was confused about May Day. Why did some people call it Community Day and others May Day? Why did only our town celebrate it? And what was with the Maypole?

Now that I’ve read up on it, the confusion is understandable. The short version is that Community Day or May Day is a combination of events. The longer version is . . .

Cleaning up the Town
Community Day got its start in 1913 writes B. W. Lyon. At that time, the town was 800 people, a few saloons and stores and a wood schoolhouse. “The children were careless about marking, and the buildings were marred and streets and vacant lots and much of the residence property was strewn with rubbish,” says Lyon in 1954.

The kids cleaned up the school grounds and got so excited they went to Mayor Nettleton and suggested a “town clean up day” to remove the graffiti. The residents got into the event and rubbish was soon going up in smoke. What couldn’t be burned was hauled away — and community day was born.

The following Community Day included a baseball game and socializing. “We made the Community Day a time when old timers could come back and meet many of their old friends,” says Lyon.

Mahell Ave ca 1913
Mahell Ave ca 1913

Tacoma Eastern Fair
In 1914 the Tacoma Eastern Fair started up and was soon incorporated into Community Day. In 1917 people could exhibit and win one or more of the 1,450 prizes handed out. Directors of the Fair were from all the communities — from Kapowsin to Ashford — and Lyon as president.

As the years progressed the popular Community Day programs were “varied and elaborate”. In 1926 over 3,000 people attended (based on the population that would be 8,000+ today). It took two days to build the booths and the highlight that year was laying the cornerstone of the Masonic Lodge.

First crowing of the May Day Queen - Fay Williams
First crowing of the May Day Queen - Fay Williams by King Bill Smith

Royal Court
A May Fete, or royal court, was started in 1919, by Bertha Mahaffie. It was its own event and held on May Day, until 1926 when it too was combined with Community Day. The first Community Day royalty were Queen Faye Williams and King Bill Smith.

By about 1936 Community Day had become mostly a May Fete celebration — grade school children “participated with folk dances before the floral throne of the king and queen”, and there were also track events, a school baseball game, a senior play in the evening, and displays by different grades and school departments.

Fast forward 75 years to the first Friday in May. Eatonville still celebrates Community Day . . . or May Day.

Here’s to the kids who started the ball rolling!

Big Incline – National, Wash.

Big Incline, Pac. Nat. Lumber Co., 1926
Big Incline, Pac. Nat. Lumber Co., 1926

This image was recently donated to the Eatonville Historical Society. It was taken by photographer C. Kinsey in August 1926 of the “Big Incline” at Pacific National Lumber Company in National, Wash.

There were a number of logging accidents every year in the area. This incline looks dangerous even without loggers using it.

Photo courtesy of Eatonville Historical Society.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

The Pour House was once an ice cream shop

Ice cream store ca 1926
Ice cream store ca 1926

The buildings around Eatonville have housed quite a few different businesses over the decades.

Ruth and Waddell’s Confectionery was probably today’s Pour House. The store was gutted in 1923 by a fire that tore through town.

I’m guessing the picture was taking around 1926 because that’s when Royal Ice Cream (still in operation today) started delivering products. And also because the “straw boater’s hat” which the man on the left is sporting, was the height of style back then.

A little about the owners
Owners Frank Ruth and Waddell were both active businessmen, but not much is written about them. Besides owning the Confectionery, we know Frank was on the town council for some time and Lee open a place called Columbia Cafe in 1912.

Swiss Straw Hat ad in 1926
Swiss Straw Hat ad in 1926

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlage.

Center Street 1926

Center Street around 1926
Center Street around 1926

This picture has a little wear and tear, but it’s one of my favorites of Center Street, taken around 1926. You can clearly see Christensen’s Clothing (now the Sears building), and kitty corner from it is the Eatonville Bank.

Some of the hot topics in Eatonville that year were:

The paving of Mountain Road (known now as Highway 7). It was paved except through the Nisqually Canyon and Ashford celebrated with a dance in September.

• Clay company reopens. The Far West Clay Co. of Clay City got started up under new management after having been out of operation for a four years.

Friendly Inn. The inn was remodeled and reopened. Little did they know it would become the scene of an unsolved two years later.

• Bootleggers Sermons. Rev. C. L. Walker of the Community Methodist Church preached a series of sermons on about liquor, including: “Pure Moonshine, Or How Will you Have Your Poison?” and “The Failure of Prohibition — can a man be Patriotic and still break the laws he does not like?” 

Photo Courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Christmas Dinner at Ohop Grange, 1926

Christmas party at the Ohop Grange
Christmas party at the Ohop Grange

Folks are gathered here in the Ohop Grange for Christmas dinner, probably around 1926 when the building went up.

The Ohop Grange was chartered October 24, 1924, and has been active every since.

The first meetings were held at the Edgerton  Schoolhouse until the grange was constructed. The members built it themselves for only $650 in materials.

It’s always been kind of a community center for the Ohop Valley residents — like myself. My earliest memories involve being part of Grange Christmas pageants and Dad dressed up like Santa. Today everything is held there from meeting to anniversaries celebrations — even my brother’s wedding reception was held there.

Interesting fact: A romance between the Grange secretary and treasurer resulted in a wedding at the Grange Hall in 1930. The lovebirds were Velma LeMaster and Matthias Kjelstad

Matt and Velma Kjelstad wedding
Matt and Velma Kjelstad wedding

Photos courtesy of Steve Burwash.

Click in images to enlarge.


Class of 1926 — And their 1976 50th reunion

EHS Class of 1926
EHS Class of 1926

Time marches on all all of us. Here is the EHS graduating class of 1926, followed by their 50th reunion in 1976.

Graduating in ’26 were:

Front row (left to right): Harold Westby, class president, Fay Williams, class secretary, Nell Nightengale, Hazel Wallace, Veora Rathbone, William Smith, athletic manager, Fred Boyles.

Second Row (left to right): Arthur Semple, ASB president, Agnes Duffy, Mary Leeper, Aleda Jacobson, class treasurer, Edith Berg, Ivan Swanson, Nels Yefeldt.

Third Row (left to right): Morgan Williams, Kenneth Burgess, Doris Hecht, Miss Lillian Larson, advisor, Worthy Hecht.

Class Motto: Quality no Quantity.  Colors: purple and gold

1976 Reunion

Class of 1926's 50th reunion
Class of 1926's 50th reunion

At the 50th reunion held in 1976 a number of the classmates were present:

Back Row (left to right): Aleda Jacobson (Jordon), Bill Smith, Fred Boyles, Kenneth Burgess, ??, Ester Neilsen (Larson), Casey Swanson.

Front Row (left to right): Veora Rathbone (Rotter), Fay Williams (Duke), Worthy Hecht, Doris Hecht (Trent) and Edith Berg (Loden).

Photos courtesy of Arlene Duke. 

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

Class roster 1926
Class roster 1926

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1976 50th reunion roster
1976 50th reunion roster