1940s

Paradise Inn 1940s and Today

Inside Paradise Inn, 1940s
Inside Paradise Inn, 1940s

Paradise Inn in the 1940s looked similar to what it looks like today. One difference is that the large, wood floor is covered with carpet. Madora Dawkins says that Bem Dawkins (Jess Dawkins‘ father) put in that floor.

She says next time you’re up there, peak under the carpet. It’s still as beautiful as it was then.

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

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Today's Paradise Inn
Today’s Paradise Inn

 

Red & White Store

Red and White Store
Red and White Store

The Red and White store used to be a familiar feature on Mashell Ave. For years you’d walk in and find Keith Malcom and Jesse Dawkins ready to serve you.

The building is no longer standing, and the spot it used to sit is currently the Kirk’s Pharmacy parking lot.

The memories live on though. Here are a few.

Barbara Baublits Schatz: Loved the meat market smell as you were walking up the ramp.

David Beane: I remember the tinkley little bell when entering from Mashall Ave. Because of the ramp, the store clerk could not always see if someone entered the store.

Frank Hurlburt: I remember going there to buy feed for the horses and chickens. Mom used to buy my Levi’s there too.

Image courtesy of Randy Stewart.

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June Carney Behind the Horses

June (Jensen) Carney behind the horses
June (Jensen) Carney behind the horses

This shot was taken of a young June (Duffy) Carney behind the a team of horses on the family (Jensen) farm.

June is at the reins of the second photo too.

Horse teams may seem old-timey, but they are experiencing a come back.

“With smaller, more affordable equipment and with good teams starting at just a few thousand dollars, Klesick points out that horse farming can be an economical choice for the small farmer.

June (Jensen) Carney at the reigns
June (Jensen) Carney at the reigns

Klesick enjoys working with his 17 hand Belgian draft horse, half of what was once a team. Though he assures me that one horse can still do valuable work around the farm, he’s thinking of seeking out a smaller team in the 15.2 to 16.2 hand range—that is, 62 to 66 inches at the shoulder. “You don’t need to have a lot of horse,” he argues. “You want a horse with a powerful, healthy muscle structure and good angles in the hindquarters.” Klesick tips his hat to the moderately sized draft animals of historic farms, noting that “America was built with a smaller horse.”

(http://www.grownorthwest.com/2010/08/draft-power-using-horses-oxen-and-mules-on-the-farm/)

Photos courtesy of the Jensen family.

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Don’t Feed the Bear (Mount Rainier ca. 1940s)

Feeding the Bear at Mount Rainier (ca. 1940s)
Feeding the Bear at Mount Rainier (ca. 1940s)

They always tell you, don’t feed the bear. But people just can’t seem to help themselves.

Here are some folks feeding a bear at Mount Rainier, probably in late 40s. It looks like a cub standing around waiting for handouts. But where there is a small cub, there is normally a protective mother bear. Hopefully this story had a happy ending.

Photo courtesy of Linda Lewis.

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Henrickson Farm in Ohop Valley – (ca. late 40s or early 50s)

Henrickson barn in Ohop Valley, built 1947
Henrickson barn in Ohop Valley, built 1947

Today this portion of Ohop Valley is the site of Nisqually Land Trust work. But in the 1940s through the 1980s this was a working farm. The barn was built in 1947 by Fred Henrickson and is still standing today.

Photos courtesy of Gary Henrickson.

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Henrickson barn in Ohop Valley (late 40s or early 50s)
Henrickson barn in Ohop Valley (late 40s or early 50s)

Early Eatonville Grandstand and Gym (ca. 1940)

Eatonville grandstand and gyms (ca. 1920s)
Eatonville grandstand and gyms (ca. 1920s)

Early on Eatonville was more about basketball and baseball than football. The gym is the building on the right. The first basket ball team was 1912.

This picture was probably taken in the early 1940s and Eatonville. Eighty years later and the grand stand looks pretty much the same.

Photo courtesy of the Haynes family and Pat Van Eaton.

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Women at Work, Anne (Mrs. Otto Haynes) Christensen

Anne Christensen (Mrs. Otto Haynes) ca. 1940s
Anne Christensen (Mrs. Otto Haynes) ca. 1940s

This picture of Anne (Christensen) Haynes, (born 1892) was taken probably in the 40s judging by the make of her iron.

Anne married Otto Haynes (a son of 1914 Ashford pioneer Paul Haynes). Otto was the fire warden and in 1934 he and sons Elwin and Arndon ran the Haynes Shake Mill outside Eatonville.

Most of the pictures of the past show men at work in the woods and doing other manly things. You rarely see photos of women going about their jobs, like doing laundry, which was physical labor back then.

This picture is wonderful because the detail captures the life of many women of the era — the tiny kitchen, the wash bucket, heavy iron, wood stove , the hammer and other tools hanging on the wall . . . and the shaft of light coming in through a window probably over the kitchen sink.

Photo courtesy of the Haynes family.

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King’s Place — Smokes for Sale (1940s)

King's Place, ca. 1940s
King's Place, ca. 1940s

I’m not sure why I like this shot of King’s Place so much. Maybe it’s the signs:

. . .  the Camel ad in the bottom corner or the Chevron Supreme above.

. . . the slogan “Midway to Mount Rainier” or

. . . King’s Place, the House of Good Food”.

The old gas tanks just give it that additional iconic feel.

Photo courtesy of Pat VanEaton.

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Inside the Eatonville Lumber Company Store

Inside the Eatonville Lumber Company store
Inside the Eatonville Lumber Company store

Here is a peak inside the Eatonville Lumber Company store around 1942. If you look closely you can see a crack in the glass case, which looks like it’s full of Coke bottles. Pat Van Eaton says as a little kid he was always worried that if he touched that cracked case it would shatter.

As you can see, there was a little bit of everything for sale here, including dry goods.

University of Washington Collection
This picture is part of the University of Washington’s special collection and you can click HERE if you’d like to order a reproduction or one of their other Eatonville images.

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