1950s

King’s Place Ad

King's Place Matchbook 1
King’s Place Matchbook 1

These matchbook covers for King’s Place are probably from the 1940s or early 1950s. My understanding is that three-digit phone numbers were only used prior to 1958. But I’m hardly an expert on the topic. Feel free to correct me.

King's Place Matchbook 2
King’s Place Matchbook 2

King’s Place was located near the Ohop Grange, and was a popular place to eat for decades.

If you want to read more on the history of the popular roadside diner, just click HERE.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

King's Place (ca. late 50s)
King’s Place (ca. late 50s)

 

Gateway Inn (Ashford) – Then and Now

Gateway Inn, 1950s
Gateway Inn, 1950s

The Gateway Inn has been part of the local landscape for decades, located just outside the park entrance.

Here is a shot of it in the 1950s (judging by the cars). I love the signs over the doors – Steaks and Trout — and the pay phone off to the left.

The second shot, taken recently, comes off the Gateway Inn website, where the advertisement is probably similar to what printed 60 years ago. “Crackling fires, rustic cabins, and the natural wildlife awaits you at Gateway Inn, ideally situated in the majesty of Mount Rainier National Park.”

Gateway Inn 2016
Gateway Inn 2016

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

Snowy LaGrande – ca. early 50s

Snow covered gas station in LaGrande
Snow covered gas station in LaGrande
Check out the ice cicles, LaGrande
Check out the ice cicles, LaGrande

These LaGrande homes may not be standing any longer, but the these snowy shots will live on. The interesting thing about these images is that the residents were staying warm with electricity not wood (no chimneys), which was uncommon back then.

Thank you Jeannie Woehl for sharing.

Keeping warm with electricity in LaGrande
Keeping warm with electricity in LaGrande

These photos are part of the Tacoma Power Company collection.

Click on images to enlarge.

Mashell Telephone Co. Switchboard – the Ts

Mashell Telephone Co. switchboard - the Ts
Mashell Telephone Co. switchboard – the Ts

Here is a page from the Mashell Telephone Co. switchboard that went out of use in the early 1950s.

Recognize any names?

•Bartlett’s Country Store, 2-3681
• Lewis G. Taylor, 2-4324
• Lloyd L. Thomas, 2-4853
• Morris Thomas, 2-4421
Leif Thorvaldson, 2-3381
• Dave Thureson, 2-4134
Willam R. Tone, 126 J1
Town Hall, 362
• Thomas F. Tracy, 2-3598

Photo courtesy of Roni Johnson.

Click on image to enlarge.

O.E. Haynes & Sons, Hand-Split Cedar Shakes (ca. 1950s)

O. E. Haynes & Sons Advertisement
O. E. Haynes & Sons Advertisement

If you needed cedar shakes in Eatonville, O. E. Haynes & Sons was the place to go. Their ad even claims, “We have available at the moment the most complete selection of hand-split Cedar Shakes in the Northwest. Wholesale and retail.”

The company gets points for creativity too. I’m not sure if Otto Haynes came up with “We Shake the World” himself, but it’s a catchy and clever logo.

Prices were lower and phone numbers were shorter back then. If you doubt that 2-3375 number would put you through to the company, just check out this picture of the old Eatonville switchboard. The O. E. Haynes & Sons number is down toward the bottom, written in by hand.

Images courtesy of Roni Johnson.

Click on images to enlarge. 

Eatonville Switchboard
Eatonville Switchboard

National Loggers Baseball Team from the 50’s

National Loggers Baseball Team from the 50’
National Loggers Baseball Team from the 50’

The National Loggers Baseball Team from the 50’s was a championship team.

L to R Top: Don Stewart,  Mel Ceccanti, Al Mierke, Bob Fore, Jack Lyday
L to R Front: Frank Bloom, Frank Lyday, Don Fore, Don Rose, Jack Chappell
Jack Chappell “He played baseball in the Army and on the National Loggers Softball team sponsored by Weyerhaeuser, and was the player-coach for many years.” (Dispatch)
Photo courtesy of Tom and Karen Smallwood
Click on image to enlarge.

May Pole – 1950s

May Pole dance 1950s
May Pole dance 1950s

The May Pole has been a part of Eatonville’s May Day celebrations since its start. In fact, if you wanted to find out if someone went to school in Eatonville, one of the questions would be, “What year did you dance the May Pole?”

We are part of a grand tradition. The May Pole has been a recorded practice in parts of Europe since Medieval times.

Here are a couple shots from (I think) the 1950s may poles. Please correct me if I’m wrong.

May Pole - ca. 1950s
May Pole – ca. 1950s

Photos courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Eatonville City Hall (ca. 1950s)

City Hall, Police Dept., Utilities
City Hall, Police Dept., Utilities

Here’s an earlier version of Eatonville’s City Hall, as well the Light and Water Dept. and the Police Headquarters. By the 1970s it had been replaced with with the newer version.

Rosemarie Van Cleve was the Court Commissioner for many years.  She worked first with Judge Frank Van Eaton. When judges had to be attorneys, Eatonville was assigned Judge Steiner in 1962.

Steiner was a part-time judge and came to town every other Friday. The rest of the time, Court Commissioner Rosemarie Van Cleve handled all court duties. She heard cases, found people guilty, assessed fines, suspended licenses . . . everything by sentence someone to jail. That had to wait for Judge Steiner.

The District Court used to be held on the first floor, but over time more room was needed and it was moved upstairs. Court was still held downstairs because many people couldn’t make it up the stairs. Rosemarie says, “I got my exercise in those days.”

Interesting Fact: The window past the door on the side of the building was first a cell, and then later Rosemarie’s office.
Center Street, ca. 1957
Center Street, ca. 1957

Innovative Bookkeeping System
There was more to being Court Commissioner in Eatonville than just hearing cases, Rosemarie was also in charge of the bookkeeping. She developed a system (pre-computer) that she says was “very simple and impossible to cheat”. The system caught the attention of others. “There was a man from Eastern Washington and another from Olympia that stayed a whole week looking at the system.” They liked what they saw and the system was adapted for County and State courts.

Exams
Later on, the State wanted Court Commissioners to also be attorneys. If non-attorney court commissioners like Rosemarie wanted to remain commissioners they would have to sit for an 8-hour exam. Out of the 250 court commissioners that sat for the exam, 13 passed, and one was Rosemarie, and she kept working in Eatonville until she retired in 1998.

 Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

Mount Rainier Entrance – early 1900s

Mt. Rainier visitors (early 1900s)
Mt. Rainier visitors (early 1900s)

In 1899, Mount Rainier was the fifth area in the United States to be designated a National Park.

In 1911 the first car reached the area. As roads and railways began pushing into the wilderness, and the population grew, so did the number of visitors to the National Park. Annual visitation was already exceeding one million in the 1950s, and continues to exceed two million today. ( Per Go Northwest)

Pictured are a few early visitors to the park.

Photo courtesy of Rich Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.