Clyde Williams

Clyde Williams (1971)

Clyde Williams 1971
Clyde Williams 1971

This shot of Clyde Williams was taken in 1971 by Joe Larin. You only have to search Clyde’s name on this blog to find out he and his family were a big piece of the community.

Clyde Williams and Frank Van Eaton, 1911
Clyde Williams and Frank Van Eaton, 1911

I’ve always liked this second shot of Clyde and Frank Van Eaton take at the Washington State Fair in 1908. The two boys look like they were less than happy to have their picture taken. And Clyde has about the same expression 60 years later.

Image courtesy of the Baublits family.

Click on images to enlarge.

First Eatonville School House (ca. 1905)

Eatonville's First School
Eatonville’s First School

The Eatonville School District has come a long way in the last 100+ years. This was Eatonville’s first schoolhouse. You can find it today at Glacier View Park. 

Here is some information about the little school house from Dixie Walter’s blog, written in 2006:

The following historical excerpt is from the History of Tacoma Eastern Area by Jeannette Hlavin and Pearl Engle written in 1954. “The first school was the log house built from logs and nails and on ground donated by T. C. Van Eaton. It stood across the Mashell Avenue from the present grade school building. Some of the Scandinavian settlers were “Broad axe men,” experts at hewing logs or lumber, and they hewed the material for the school house.

First School House (photo taken 2006)
First School House (photo taken 2006)

“The first teacher was Miss Alice Dodge. School was conducted only three months a year. Two other teachers taught in the log school house, Miss Hortense Oliver and Miss. P. Messinger.

“Some towns neglect their historic buildings but this cannot be said of Eatonville. The old log school house has been tenderly cared for and is often referred to sentimentally in writings and speeches of local people.

Clyde Williams says that when it was to be removed from its original location, he said to T. C. Van Eaton, who with a team of horses, was his partner on the job: “Let’s save it” and Van Eaton replied: “All right, we have plenty of room.” Accordingly, they hitched it to the horses with chains and pulled it to the spot where it now stands.

Mensik family school photo
Mensik family school photo

“Before 1912 church services were held in it.

B. W. Lyon told the Community Day audience in 1923 that when he was school superintendent here, an orphan boy was permitted to live in the old school house. He was placed in charge of the agricultural class’s poultry, and was allowed to keep what money he made from it. In this way he was enabled to complete the high school course here. His name was John Kruger and in 1923 he was head of the Agriculture Department of the Sumas public schools.

“The Fortnightly Club used the building as a club house for some years, and it is now used for the same purpose by the Girl Scouts.”

For decades the old school house stood in the area behind the present day tennis court at the high school. Eventually, through the efforts of the Dogwood Garden Club it was moved to it’s present site. The log building has been used as the Eatonville Cooperative Nursery School for thirty-one years.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family and Bob Walter.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Sunday School – 1900

Sunday School, 1900, Clyde Williams
Sunday School, 1900, Clyde Williams

Sunday school has probably changed a bit over the years. At the very least, you don’t see many Sunday school teachers wearing all black anymore.

Herd is Clyde Williams‘ Sunday school class of 1900. If anyone has more information about the photo, please share!

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

Big Smile by Hazel Joy Williams (ca. 1920)

Hazel Joy Williams up front
Front: Hazel Joy Williams — Middle: Cecil Williams, Fern Fenton, Fay Williams — Back: Charley Williams, Bill Oxley, Clyde Williams

This may be the cutest picture posted to-date. Just zoom in and tell me you don’t smile.

Rich Williams provides wonderful background on everyone.

“In the front row making the funny face is my father’s (Cecil Williams) youngest sister Hazel Joy Williams. Joy, as she went by, married Cliff Pratt August 3, 1936 and lived most of her life in Gig Harbor.  She taught school at Rosedale Elementary for 36 years. Joy and Cliff had three children; Tom, Joan and Don, who all attended Rosedale Elementary School . While in Joy’s classroom, there was one stipulation — they were never to call her mother during class.  Joy died in 2002 at the age of 90.

“The boy on the left in the middle row is my father Cecil Williams. Dad married my mother Ruth Anderson in 1935 and worked at Eatonville Lumber Company before and after World War II. During the war, he served in the Navy Seabee’s. He was stationed in the Allusion Islands and later on Tinian  in the Mariana Islands. After the war, he had his own electrical business plus he managed the Town of Eatonville electrical department. My folks lived at Clear lake for over 50 years and  Dad passed away in 2003 at the age of 92.

“Center, middle row, is my dad’s cousin, Fern Fenton. Her father, George Fenton, married my grandmother’s sister Merl Duncan. George and my grandfather were best friends.”

“Center right, disgusted with her sister’s antics,  is my father’s older sister Fay Williams. Fay graduated from Eatonville High School in 1926 and was Eatonville’s first May Day Queen. She later married Art Duke. The Duke family homesteaded in the Alder area in the 1890’s.  Art and Fay had two children, Jim and Arlene. Fay worked at Rhodes Department Store for many years and passed away in 2003 at the age of 94.

“In the back row on the left is my grandfather’s older brother Charley Williams. Charley owned and operated the Pioneer Garage in Eatonville.  The building is now the Tall Timber Restaurant.

“Back row, center is a family friend named Bill Oxley.”

“On the right, back row, is my grandfather Clyde Williams. Clyde married Hettie Duncan in 1907. Clyde was a shingle weaver for over thirty years. He worked at Eatonville Lumber Company until the shingle mill closed down then worked at the shingle mill in Mineral until the late 50’s. He retired and lived in Eatonville until 1971. He was determined to be around when Ruthie and I got married August 15, 1971. He died one week later.”

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

Frank Van Eaton & Clyde Williams at the Fair (1908)

Clyde Williams and Frank Van Eaton, 1911
Clyde Williams and Frank Van Eaton, 1908

The 2013 Washington State Fair has just come to an end. In 1908 two boys from Eatonville, Clyde Williams and Frank Van Eaton were on their way home after having a good time.

This postcard shows the boys in the band uniforms. The boys don’t look too excited about this picture.

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

Postcard, side #2
Postcard, side #2

Taking down those BIG trees

Logging the early years — Clyde Williams
Logging the early years — Clyde Williams

These three men were photographed taking down one of the large trees near Eatonville. On the right, on the springboard, is Clyde Williams.

They made the men tough back then. I don’t know about you, but if it was me who had to take down this tree with two of my girlfriends, I think you’d have to give us several months to do the job.

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Van Eaton’s Garage (ca.1947)

Van Eatons ca. 1950s
Van Eatons ca. 1950s

Before it was Eatonville Auto Center (on Mashell Ave. and Carter Street) it was Van Eaton’s garage. Here’s a great picture from the 50s. The cars have changed a bit and there aren’t any gas pumps, but you can still recognize the building.

To see some pictures of the building of the 1946 construction, just click HERE.

Pat Van Eaton says, “This was taken around 1947. Left to right is Bill Brainard, John Van Eaton, (unknown) and Clyde Williams. It was the Van Eaton and Brainard Kaiser Frazer dealership. They also sold Studebaker trucks, rototillers, Alice Chalmers farm tractors and Superior fire place inserts along with a Shell Oil gas distribution plant. Later they had a Union 76 distribution. Bill Brainard sold his interest in 1953 for $50,000 or about $447,000 in today’s dollars. WWII was over and people wanted everything.”

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on image to enlarge.

The Williams Men (early 1900s)

Back: Clyde Williams and Charlie Williams, Front, Leon Williams and Nate Williams
Back: Clyde Williams and Charlie Williams, Front, Leon Williams and Nate Williams

Someone was able gather up the Williams men for this early 1900s shot. Pictured in the back, left to right, is Clyde Williams and Charlie Williams. Front, left to right, is Leon Williams and Nate Williams.

Each of these men played a role in the town’s history. If you would like to know more, just click on their names.

Photo courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on image to enlarge.