early 1900s

Glacier Basin Adventure in early 1900s and today

Great Basin Adventure - early 1990s and today
Glacier Basin Adventure – early 1990s and today

Here’s a little before and after combo. The top is the Glacier Basin Adventure in the very early 1900s, and below is the same view in 2016.

It’s hard to believe there was mining done at Mt. Rainier. “In 1948, 47 tons of ore was shipped off to Tacoma. In fact, it wasn’t until 1984 that the government purchased the last of the park’s inholdings. (The Big Fact Book of Mount Rainier)

Thank you Jeff Morrison for providing these.

Click on image to enlarge.

Glacier Basin, early 1900s vs. 2016

Glacier Basin early 1900s vs. 2016
Glacier Basin early 1900s vs. 2016

Thank you Jeff Morrison for showing us a glimpse of Glacier Basin then and now. The first shot was taken in the early 1900s, the lower one taken in 2016.

The Glacier Basin hike is a popular one at Mt. Rainier. The information below was taken from the website:

“Originally a mining road along the Inter Fork of the White River, the route was converted into a trail when the area became a national park. Visitors ranged from climbers accessing the popular Emmons Glacier, to families strolling out of White River campground. Located in close proximity to the dynamic, glacier-fed White River, the original trail was frequently damaged by the river’s shifting course. After the floods in 2006, the park elected to build a new trail that was no longer subject to the floods.”

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Behind the Desk at the Snow Hotel (early 1900s)

Snow Hotel, Mr. Snow behind desk
Snow Hotel, Mr. Snow behind desk

The Snow Hotel, built in 1912, was part of Eatonville’s Mashell Ave. for many years (in the lot next to Key Bank). Here is a shot of Mr. C. C. Snow behind the desk. It’s August 8, but I can’t make out the year.

For more information about the hotel just click HERE.

Photo courtesy of the Parnell family.

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Snow Hotel
Snow Hotel
Dining at the Hotel Snow
Dining at the Hotel Snow

 

Tokens from National (late 1800s and early 1900s)

C.C. Ketchum Token from National
C.C. Ketchum Token from National

The old-timers might remember the town of National, a logging town up the line. There isn’t much left not except for some photos.

Randy Stewart also came across some tokens from the town. Both are from C.C. Ketchum tokens.

Token with the hole in the center was popular in the late 1800s.

Now I’m not sure (I’m taking this off the internet on a forum about tokens) but the token with the hole in it was possibly used for gambling.

“I have read posts [*] that also say they were used in slot or game of chance machines. You would put in a U.S. nickel and the machine would pay out in trade tokens to get around the gambling laws. The numbers are supposed to have linked the tokens to a certain machine.”

National Loggers - photo from UofW Library
National Loggers – photo from UofW Library

Another man said, “I’ve heard that those were used in slot machines in bars. To get around the gambling prohibition, the machine would pay out in those tokens, which were supposedly redeemable only for merchandise. Unofficially, the bartender would give cash for them if he knew you well enough.”

All I know is that these coins were used at National, probably by a bunch of loggers like these.

Thank you Randy for sharing.

Images Courtesy of Randy Stewart.

Click on images to enlarge. 

C.C. Ketchum Token from National (back)
C.C. Ketchum Token from National (back)
C.C. Ketchum Token from National #2
C.C. Ketchum Token from National #2

 

 

 

 

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Alder Road (early 1900s)

Walter Ashford involved in road construction
Alder road construction

All the information I have with this photo is “Alder Road Construction.” If anyone has more details, please share them.

The planks in the background I assume were going to be used for the road. I say this because here’s another shot, this time of Alder’s main street, made from planks.

Images courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

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Alder's Main street
Alder’s Main street

 

Emma and Ernest Boettcher and the BIG Trees

Ernest Boettcher
Ernest Boettcher
Emma Boettcher Mc Gillivary
Emma Boettcher Mc Gilivery

The trees were enormous early in the 1900s. Here are Emma Boettcher McGilvery and Ernest Boettcher of Alder standing with some of the incredible trees.

What seems almost impossible to imagine is that the tree Ernest is standing in front of was sawed down with a two man crosscut saw. If you look closely you can see the saw still in the tree at the top.

If you’re curious, check out this video Chainsaw vs. Crosscut saw. I apologize for the quality, but it’s demonstrates that the saw and two men could get the job done.

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.