Eatonville High School

Morgan and Ray Williams (ca. 1910)

Morgan Williams & Ray Williams
Morgan Williams & Ray Williams

These two little kids are Morgan and Ray Williams.

Ray was the son of Charley Williams, who owned the Pioneer Garage — known today at the Tall Timber Restaurant. Ray graduated from Eatonville High School in 1923 and was quite the athlete. He was on the incredible basketball team that went to Chicago and was also a state champion in track, competing in the 880, broad jump and high jump.

Photo and information courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

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Ray Williams, Basket ball player 1923
Ray Williams, Basket ball player 1923

First Debate Team at EHS (1913-1914)

1913 School Catalog - Debate Team
1913 School Catalog - Debate Team

This was taken from the Eatonville 1913/1914 school catalog. It appears that we stomped Roy High School when it came to debating issues.

The Eatonville-Roy Debate looked at topics like, “The annexation of Canada to the U.S. would be for the best interests of both countries.” Would love to hear the same debate today.

The champion debaters were: Hans Christensen, Hugo Johnson, Carrie Nagley and Helen Engle.

Courtesy of Ruth Williams.

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Arial shots of Eatonville (1950s)

Looking down at Eatonville (1950s)
Looking down at Eatonville (1950s)

This shot of Eatonville was taken around the 1955, I believe in conjunction with Operation Bootstrap. If anyone has a better date, please let me know.

The picture may be grainy, but there’s no question that it’s Eatonville. The high school  and the football field — which looks like it used more for baseball — stand out at the bottom.

I had thought that the dark-roofed building at the top left of the football field was the FFA poultry barn I was mistaken. Pat Van Eaton says, “It was the 1952 addition to the grade school. It had rooms for kindergarten, 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades.  The school lunchroom was in the basement. It was a California design with a “flat” roof that drained toward the center and had massive single pane windows for the class rooms. We’re lucky it go demo’d”

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton and the Eatonville Historical Society.

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High School Under Construction (1915)

EHS under construction ca. 1915
EHS under construction ca. 1915

The Eatonville high school was under construction in 1915. When it was complete, there was no other school like it in the state. The dedication was huge.

Dedication
On dedication day, April 29, [1916], E. W. Shimmons wrote, “With Governor Lister, State Superintendent Josephine Preston, President E. O. Holland of the State college and W. H. Paulhamus of Sumner as dedicatory speaker, with the entire population of Eatonvile and vicinity present, the mangificant $45,000 (approximately $975,500 today) high school was formally dedicated.

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

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Driving to EHS (1929)

Eatonville High School and cars around 1929
Eatonville High School and cars around 1929

Parents and students have been picking up and dropping off outside the Eatonville High School since the dawn of automobiles — which wasn’t much before than this 1929 photo was taken.

In 1925 an ad proclaimed the Model T “within the means of millions.” It was.  The runabout sold for $260 in 1924 ($3,300 in today’s dollar) and the touring version ran for  $290 (around $3,700 today).

The Tin Lizzie, as it was known, could run on anything from gasoline to good-grade kerosene. (Popular Mechanics)

Photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

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1913 Baseball team & School Courses

Here is a glimpse into the “Catalogue and Announcement of Eatonville Public Schools for Session 1913-14”. This 28-page catalog was leather bound and contained just everything you needed to know about Eatonville School, including the blueprint of the gymnasium that was under construction.

Shown here is 1913 EHS  baseball team.
Top Row (LtoR): F. Petersen, M. Van Eaton, H. Elmlund, Mr. Lyon, Mr. Hollingsworth, H. Johnson, W. Nettleton.
Bottom Row: (LtoR): C. Williams, E. Pravitz, E. Christensen, R. Christensen, G. Smith.

1913 School catalog - Course Study
1913 School catalog - Course Study

Course Outline
For you academics, you’ll be interested to see that the course outline reads more like today’s colleges. You could pick your course of study — classical, scientific, manual arts or english.

These lines of study look pretty tough, in particular the classical with its heavy emphasis in latin, and the scientific, which included, among other things, zoology and solid geometry.

Images courtesy of Ruthie Williams. 

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

Eatonville Great Spot for Raising Chickens (1925)

Letter from T. C. Van Eaton's Real Estate letterhead
Letter from T. C. Van Eaton's Real Estate letterhead

This letter, presumable drafted by T.C. Van Eaton, makes the argument that Eatonville would be a wonderful spot for a poultry business. It’s definitely a draft, because you can see the scratched out words and edits. I especially like the part about “no cold to freeze wattles and combs”.

For those of you who don’t want to read the blue print, here’s what it says:

“Eatonville and vicinity is an ideal place to raise poultry on account of the climatic conditions, air currents, soil, drainage and the wonderful growth conditions existing in this favored locality. The climate is mild, no cold to freeze wattles and combs, very little snow or hail, nonviolent winds or excessive heat. Because of the splendid drainage there is little mud to contend with hence the yards and runs are dry enough for the comfort of health of the fowls.

The foothills breezes blow away practically all the fog that abounds nearer the salt water and occurs frequently higher up in the hills. The above conditions cause green and lush natural pastures for birds the year round.

Oats, wheat, rye, barley and other cereals grow well here, also kale and other green forage plants. Oats and kale are especially prolific.

Gravel and sharp sand together with shell abound in ample quantities and there is always abundance of pure water. Wild and tame meat are plentiful.

1914, Poultry Farm at Eatonville High School
1914, Poultry Farm at Eatonville High School

Eatonville is on the great paved road system of the State and also on the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, hence has easy excess to the markets of the world. On account of the vast lumber industry, the mining of coal and other minerals, the water power, Nitrate and Clay plants employing large numbers of men at high wage make local markets exceptionally good.

Lastly, the tourist business is a great consumer of poultry and is always willing to pay the top price.

The ease and cheapness of obtaining so many kinds of food, suitable to the birds, the especially healthy conditions which make for a long life and prime conditions for poultry, the cheapness of lumber, gravel and sand and other building materials make for particularly happy and profitable condition in the Poultry business in this region.”

Class of 1926 — And their 1976 50th reunion

EHS Class of 1926
EHS Class of 1926

Time marches on all all of us. Here is the EHS graduating class of 1926, followed by their 50th reunion in 1976.

Graduating in ’26 were:

Front row (left to right): Harold Westby, class president, Fay Williams, class secretary, Nell Nightengale, Hazel Wallace, Veora Rathbone, William Smith, athletic manager, Fred Boyles.

Second Row (left to right): Arthur Semple, ASB president, Agnes Duffy, Mary Leeper, Aleda Jacobson, class treasurer, Edith Berg, Ivan Swanson, Nels Yefeldt.

Third Row (left to right): Morgan Williams, Kenneth Burgess, Doris Hecht, Miss Lillian Larson, advisor, Worthy Hecht.

Class Motto: Quality no Quantity.  Colors: purple and gold

1976 Reunion

Class of 1926's 50th reunion
Class of 1926's 50th reunion

At the 50th reunion held in 1976 a number of the classmates were present:

Back Row (left to right): Aleda Jacobson (Jordon), Bill Smith, Fred Boyles, Kenneth Burgess, ??, Ester Neilsen (Larson), Casey Swanson.

Front Row (left to right): Veora Rathbone (Rotter), Fay Williams (Duke), Worthy Hecht, Doris Hecht (Trent) and Edith Berg (Loden).

Photos courtesy of Arlene Duke. 

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Class roster 1926
Class roster 1926

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1976 50th reunion roster
1976 50th reunion roster

Building of Eatonville Grandstand

Building the Eatonville Grandstand
Building the Eatonville Grandstand

If you’ve been to an EHS football game, you’ve probably sat in the grandstand to root on the team.

This picture shows the men in the middle of building the first Eatonville grandstand — or possibly the one that’s still there today.

This bunch of rugged guys put in a lot of back breaking work — notice all the rope for pulleys to hoist things around. In fact, these particular men were WPA workers. (The Works Projects Administration – 1935-43 – was the largest and most ambitious New Deal agency, employing millions of unskilled workers to carry out public works projects.

Eatonville Grandstand 2011
Eatonville Grandstand 2011

Not only were the bleachers (initially built for baseball) labor intensive, there was little in the way of safety equipment. However, I do notice there are 8 pipe smokers.

Photo courtesy of the Taylor family.

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